exaggerated


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ex·ag·ger·ate

 (ĭg-zăj′ə-rāt′)
v. ex·ag·ger·at·ed, ex·ag·ger·at·ing, ex·ag·ger·ates
v.tr.
To consider, represent, or cause to appear as larger, more important, or more extreme than is actually the case; overstate: exaggerated his own role in the episode; exaggerated the size of the enemy force; exaggerated how difficult the project would be.
v.intr.
To make overstatements.

[Latin exaggerāre, exaggerāt-, to heap up, magnify : ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + aggerāre, to pile up (from agger, pile, from aggerere, to bring to : ad-, ad- + gerere, to bring).]

ex·ag′ger·at′ed·ly adv.
ex·ag′ger·a′tion n.
ex·ag′ger·a′tive, ex·ag′ger·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.
ex·ag′ger·a′tor n.
Synonyms: exaggerate, inflate, magnify, overstate
These verbs mean to represent something as being larger or greater than it actually is: exaggerated the size of the fish I caught; inflated his own importance; magnifying her part in their success; overstated his income on the loan application.
Antonym: minimize

exaggerated

(ɪɡˈzædʒəˌreɪtɪd)
adj
1. unduly or excessively magnified; enlarged beyond truth or reasonableness
2. (Pathology) pathol abnormally enlarged: an exaggerated spleen.
exˈaggerˌatedly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exaggerated - represented as greater than is true or reasonable; "an exaggerated opinion of oneself"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"
2.exaggerated - enlarged to an abnormal degreeexaggerated - enlarged to an abnormal degree; "thick lenses exaggerated the size of her eyes"
increased - made greater in size or amount or degree

exaggerated

adjective overstated, extreme, excessive, over the top (informal), inflated, extravagant, overdone, tall (informal), amplified, hyped, pretentious, exalted, overestimated, overblown, fulsome, hyperbolic, highly coloured, O.T.T. (slang) Be sceptical of exaggerated claims for what these products can do.
Translations
přehnanýzveličený
liioiteltu
túlzótúlzott

exaggerated

[ɪgˈzædʒəreɪtɪd] ADJexagerado

exaggerated

[ɪgˈzædʒəreɪtɪd] adjexagéré(e)

exaggerated

adjübertrieben; to have an exaggerated view of somethingetw überschätzen; to have an exaggerated sense of one’s own importanceeine übertrieben hohe Meinung von sich haben

exaggerated

[ɪgˈzædʒəˌreɪtɪd] adjesagerato/a
to have an exaggerated opinion of o.s. → stimarsi troppo
References in classic literature ?
Not a fact has been omitted, not a detail exaggerated.
Colonel MacAndrew had not exaggerated when he said she would be penniless, and it was necessary for her to earn her own living as quickly as she could.
In contour and markings it was not unlike the noblest of the Bengals of our own world, but as its dimensions were exaggerated to colossal proportions so too were its colorings exaggerated.
Considering the strict rules of etiquette established at the court of Anne of Austria, this forgetfulness of customary civilities was a sign of preoccupation, especially on Philip's part, who, of his own accord, observed a respect towards her of a somewhat exaggerated character.
There had been, he admitted, a trivial blemish or so in its rate of progress, but this was exaggerated and had been entirely owing to the "parsimony of the public," which guilty public, it appeared, had been until lately bent in the most determined manner on by no means enlarging the number of Chancery judges appointed--I believe by Richard the Second, but any other king will do as well.
Here I may make a remark,--I am not accustomed to attach an exaggerated importance to exterior signs left in the track of a crime.
If I might offer any apology for so exaggerated a fiction as the Barnacles and the Circumlocution Office, I would seek it in the common experience of an Englishman, without presuming to mention the unimportant fact of my having done that violence to good manners, in the days of a Russian war, and of a Court of Inquiry at Chelsea.
Van Tromp is really very slender; I am only afraid that Miss Van Tromp has exaggerated our intimacy in her own imagination.
Whether it be true or false, exaggerated or otherwise, we shall like to know how he is.
The countess was upset by her friend's sorrow and humiliating poverty, and was therefore out of sorts, a state of mind which with her always found expression in calling her maid "my dear" and speaking to her with exaggerated politeness.
Your son intentionally exaggerated the significance of my words and made them ridiculous, accusing me of malicious intentions, and, as far as I could see, relied upon your correspondence with him.
The broadening of men's views that has resulted can scarcely be exaggerated.