excavation


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ex·ca·va·tion

 (ĕk′skə-vā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of excavating.
2. A hole formed by excavating.

ex•ca•va•tion

(ˌɛks kəˈveɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a hole made by excavating.
2. the act of excavating.
3. an area in which excavating has been done or is in progress, as an archaeological site.
[1605–15; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excavation - the act of diggingexcavation - the act of digging; "there's an interesting excavation going on near Princeton"
creating by removal - the act of creating by removing something
2.excavation - the site of an archeological explorationexcavation - the site of an archeological exploration; "they set up camp next to the dig"
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"
3.excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
bore-hole, drill hole, bore - a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes
delf - an excavation; usually a quarry or mine
diggings, digs - an excavation for ore or precious stones or for archaeology
ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth
mine - excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extracted
mineshaft - excavation consisting of a vertical or sloping passageway for finding or mining ore or for ventilating a mine
stone pit, quarry, pit - a surface excavation for extracting stone or slate; "a British term for `quarry' is `stone pit'"
pool - an excavation that is (usually) filled with water
root cellar, cellar - an excavation where root vegetables are stored
well - a deep hole or shaft dug or drilled to obtain water or oil or gas or brine
working, workings - a mine or quarry that is being or has been worked
4.excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earthexcavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
production - (economics) manufacturing or mining or growing something (usually in large quantities) for sale; "he introduced more efficient methods of production"
placer mining - mining valuable minerals from a placer by washing or dredging
opencast mining, strip mining - the mining of ore or coal from an open mine
bore-hole, drill hole, bore - a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes
heading, drift, gallery - a horizontal (or nearly horizontal) passageway in a mine; "they dug a drift parallel with the vein"
fathom, fthm - (mining) a unit of volume (equal to 6 cubic feet) used in measuring bodies of ore
rag - break into lumps before sorting; "rag ore"
hush - run water over the ground to erode (soil), revealing the underlying strata and valuable minerals
hush - wash by removing particles; "Wash ores"
mine - get from the earth by excavation; "mine ores and metals"
strip mine, surface mine, surface-mine - extract (ore) from a strip-mine
drive - excavate horizontally; "drive a tunnel"
extract - separate (a metal) from an ore

excavation

noun hole, mine, pit, ditch, shaft, cutting, cut, hollow, trench, burrow, quarry, dig, trough, cavity, dugout, diggings excavations in the earth
Translations
حَفْر، تَنْقيب
udgravning
ásatásfeltáráskiásás
gröftur
bouwput
hĺbenie
izkopavanje

excavation

[ˌekskəˈveɪʃən] Nexcavación f

excavation

[ˌɛkskəˈveɪʃən] n
(by archeologist)fouilles fpl
(by builder, machine)creusement m

excavation

n
(Archeol) → (Aus)grabung f; excavations (= site)Ausgrabungsstätte f
(of tunnel etc)Graben nt

excavation

[ˌɛkskəˈveɪʃn] nscavo (Archeol) → scavi mpl

excavate

(ˈekskəveit) verb
1. to dig up (a piece of ground etc) or to dig out (a hole) by doing this.
2. in archaeology, to uncover or open up (a structure etc remaining from earlier times) by digging. The archaeologist excavated an ancient fortress.
ˌexcaˈvation noun
ˈexcavator noun
a machine or person that excavates.
References in classic literature ?
Seizing his sharp boat-spade, he commenced an excavation in the body, a little behind the side fin.
Coming up again to the marsh level out of this excavation - for the rude path lay through it - I saw a light in the old sluice-house.
Before us was a great excavation, not very recent, for the sides had fallen in and grass had sprouted on the bottom.
Certain accessory points of the design served well to convey the idea that this excavation lay at an exceeding depth below the surface of the earth.
When the amphitheater had cleared I crept stealthily to the top and as the great excavation lay far from the plaza and in an untenanted portion of the great dead city I had little trouble in reaching the hills beyond.
Yes; stop up your excavation carefully, do not work any more, and wait until you hear from me.
The road wound along the brow of a precipice, and on one side was upheld by a foundation of logs piled one upon the other, while a narrow excavation in the mountain in the opposite direction had made a passage of sufficient width for the ordinary travelling of that day.
At that time I would have had a search made--even excavation if necessary--at my own expense, but all suggestions were met with a prompt and explicit negative.
She had accepted this submergence as philosophically as all her other trials, and now, in extreme old age, was rewarded by presenting to her mirror an almost unwrinkled expanse of firm pink and white flesh, in the centre of which the traces of a small face survived as if awaiting excavation.
The amphitheatre, like all I had ever seen upon Barsoom, was built in a large excavation.
Tarzan dropped to the ground and commenced to examine the earth about the excavation.
There has been a good deal of excavation going on there ever since.