exceptive


Related to exceptive: receptive, acceptive

ex·cep·tive

 (ĭk-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, being, or containing an exception.
2. Archaic Captious; faultfinding.

exceptive

(ɪkˈsɛptɪv)
adj
relating to or forming an exception
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is a universally quantified proposition that contains no exceptive clauses.
When the conclusions from the preceding chapters are combined, Conklin concludes that the sequence ki which cannot be adversative ("but, rather") or exceptive ("except, only") in context, must be understood as two independent particles: the first (kI) serves to indicate that the following clause is to be understood as an oath, and the second ('im) couches the oath's content in the familiar conditional format.
While Section 501(c)(4) is also used as a catch-all provision for organizations that provide a significant public benefit but resist classification under the other exceptive provisions of Section 501(c), id.
Collins argues for Matthew 5:32, minus the exceptive clause as closer to the original statement.
In this case the concept of globality assumes not traditional but absolutely new, exceptive meanings and inspires new treatments and interpretations.
This included helping with the construction of a guard post to protect one of the entrances to the Lamandau National Park and also to guard a release site for rehabilitated, orphaned and exceptive orang-utans, as well as reforestation of areas of rainforest destroyed by fire.
This led us, in 1986, to abandon the concept of separate development and to adopt a new vision of a united South Africa--with one-person, one-vote; with all forms of discrimination to be abolished; with the exceptive protection of minorities against suppression or oppression; and with effective controls over the pursuit of power.
While the overall construction licenses a reflexive complement for the exceptive, this is barred in the case of a nominal for which de se interpretation is in principle impossible.
3) Although every medical treatment has been called an experiment with an n of 1, experiments are nonetheless generally thought to be exceptive cases in the practice of medicine as a whole.
Written sometime after 1396, the tract is a specimen of the art of sophistria, or sophistic arguments, and it covers the following main topics: sophistria as a science, signification, syncategorematic terms, supposition, ampliation, restriction, complex signifiables, the significate of a proposition, mediate and immediate terms, propositions with a comparative or superlative term, and exceptive, exclusive and reduplicative propositions.
In Basil's case the exceptive clause of Matthew was the main justification.
As an exceptive condition to the rule, therefore, family ties are acceptable-but practically speaking make no difference.