exchanged


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Related to exchanged: exchanged contracts

ex·change

 (ĭks-chānj′)
v. ex·changed, ex·chang·ing, ex·chang·es
v.tr.
1. To give in return for something received; trade: exchange dollars for francs; exchanging labor for room and board.
2. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: exchange gifts; exchange ideas.
3. To give up for a substitute: exchange a position in the private sector for a post in government.
4. To turn in for replacement: exchange defective merchandise at a store.
v.intr.
1. To give something in return for something received; make an exchange.
2. To be received in exchange: At that time the British pound exchanged for $2.80.
n.
1. The act or an instance of exchanging: a prisoner exchange; an exchange of greetings.
2. One that is exchanged.
3. A place or network for exchanging things, especially a center where securities or commodities are bought and sold.
4. A telephone exchange.
5.
a. A system of payments using instruments, such as negotiable drafts, instead of money.
b. The fee or percentage charged for participating in such a system of payment.
6. A bill of exchange.
7. A rate of exchange.
8. The amount of difference in the actual value of two or more currencies or between values of the same currency at two or more places.
9. A dialogue: a heated exchange between the two in-laws.
adj.
Of or relating to a reciprocal arrangement between a local and a foreign institution or group: an exchange student; exchange programs for students learning foreign languages.

[Middle English eschaungen, from Anglo-Norman eschaungier, from Vulgar Latin *excambiāre : Latin ex-, ex- + Late Latin cambīre, to exchange, barter; see change.]

ex·change′a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exchanged - changed for (replaced by) something different
changed - made or become different in nature or form; "changed attitudes"; "changed styles of dress"; "a greatly changed country after the war"
References in classic literature ?
And Meg laughed also at the queer look which the sisters exchanged as she thus described her supposed lover.
In the course of these civilities, a few sentences were exchanged, that served to establish the appearance of an amicable intercourse between the parties.
On his arrival from the other world, he had merely found it necessary to spend a quarter of an hour at a barber's, who had trimmed down the Puritan's full beard into a pair of grizzled whiskers, then, patronizing a ready-made clothing establishment, he had exchanged his velvet doublet and sable cloak, with the richly worked band under his chin, for a white collar and cravat, coat, vest, and pantaloons; and lastly, putting aside his steel-hilted broadsword to take up a gold-headed cane, the Colonel Pyncheon of two centuries ago steps forward as the Judge of the passing moment!
And we exchanged there, in the stillness, a sound of the oddest amusement.
Abashed glances of servile wonder were exchanged by the sailors, as this was said; and with fascinated eyes they awaited whatever magic might follow.
Jurgis sat and exchanged thoughts with him about the old country, and the places where they had been and the work they had done.
Then you shall be courteously entreated to call and examine, and shall find an abundance of husbands, wives, brothers, sisters, fathers, mothers, and young children, to be "sold separately, or in lots to suit the convenience of the purchaser;" and that soul immortal, once bought with blood and anguish by the Son of God, when the earth shook, and the rocks rent, and the graves were opened, can be sold, leased, mortgaged, exchanged for groceries or dry goods, to suit the phases of trade, or the fancy of the purchaser.
By and by the usual bows were exchanged, and we separated.
Then the dead were counted, prisoners exchanged, the terms of the next disagreement agreed upon, and the day for the necessary battle appointed; after which the armies fell into line and marched away, and Tom turned homeward alone.
Miss Ross, a lady that paints, gave me the sunshade," said Rebecca, when she had exchanged looks with Mr.
The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, "Men never know when things are dirty or not;" and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, "Women will have their little nonsenses and needless cares.