exclamation


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

ex·cla·ma·tion

 (ĕk′sklə-mā′shən)
n.
1. An abrupt, forceful utterance: an exclamation of delight.
2. An outcry, as of protest.
3. Grammar An interjection.

exclamation

(ˌɛkskləˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. an abrupt, emphatic, or excited cry or utterance; interjection; ejaculation
2. the act of exclaiming
ˌexclaˈmational adj

ex•cla•ma•tion

(ˌɛk skləˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of exclaiming; outcry; loud complaint or protest.
2. an interjection.
[1350–1400; < Latin]

exclamation

A sudden cry or statement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exclamation - an abrupt excited utteranceexclamation - an abrupt excited utterance; "she gave an exclamation of delight"; "there was much exclaiming over it"
utterance, vocalization - the use of uttered sounds for auditory communication
dickens, deuce, devil - a word used in exclamations of confusion; "what the devil"; "the deuce with it"; "the dickens you say"
ejaculation, interjection - an abrupt emphatic exclamation expressing emotion
expostulation - an exclamation of protest or remonstrance or reproof
2.exclamation - a loud complaint or protest or reproach
complaint - (formerly) a loud cry (or repeated cries) of pain or rage or sorrow
3.exclamation - an exclamatory rhetorical deviceexclamation - an exclamatory rhetorical device; "O tempore! O mores"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)

exclamation

noun cry, call, shout, yell, outcry, utterance, ejaculation, expletive, interjection, vociferation Sue gave an exclamation of surprise.

exclamation

noun
A sudden, sharp utterance:
Translations
تَعَجُّب، صَرخَة تَعَجُّب
udbrududråb
huudahdus
upphrópun
vzklik
haykırma

exclamation

[ˌekskləˈmeɪʃən]
A. Nexclamación f
B. CPD exclamation mark, exclamation point (US) N (Ling) → signo m de admiración

exclamation

[ˌɛkskləˈmeɪʃən] nexclamation f
to give an exclamation → pousser une exclamationexclamation mark npoint m d'exclamationexclamation point (US) npoint m d'exclamation

exclamation

nAusruf m (also Gram); an exclamation of horrorein Schreckensschrei m

exclamation

[ˌɛkskləˈmeɪʃn] nesclamazione f

exclaim

(ikˈskleim) verb
to call out, or say, suddenly and loudly. `Good !' he exclaimed; She exclaimed in astonishment.
exclamation (ekskləˈmeiʃən) noun
an expression of surprise or other sudden feeling. He gave an exclamation of anger.
exclamation mark
the mark (!) following and showing an exclamation.
References in classic literature ?
Meg forgot her foot and rose so quickly that she was forced to catch hold of Jo, with an exclamation of pain.
Professor Bumper had made only a few remarks to the man who had so unexpectedly appeared out of the jungle when the scientist gave an exclamation of surprise at some of the answers made.
I strained my ears and eyes to catch every exclamation.
Pontellier, unable to read his newspaper with any degree of comfort, arose with an expression and an exclamation of disgust.
As they traversed that short distance, not a voice was heard among them; but a slight exclamation proceeded from the younger of the females, as the Indian runner glided by her, unexpectedly, and led the way along the military road in her front.
The tipstaffs beat upon the rail, the lawyer he had interrupted uttered an indignant exclamation, Andrews came hurriedly toward him, and the young judge slowly turned his head.
He was interrupted by the pressure of Christie's fingers on his arm and a subdued exclamation from Jessie, who was staring down the street.
Her tone, as she uttered the exclamation, had a plaintive and really exquisite melody thrilling through it, yet without subduing a certain something which an obtuse auditor might still have mistaken for asperity.
The exclamation was homely, but it revealed a real acceptance of my further proof of what, in the bad time-- for there had been a worse even than this
I was a little alarmed by his energy, perhaps also a little touched at the hearty grief in his concluding exclamation, but said as calmly as I could, What you say is no doubt true enough, sir; but how could I know there was any peculiar ferocity in that particular whale, though indeed I might have inferred as much from the simple fact of the accident.
And this thought it must have been which suggested to Ahab that wild exclamation of his, when one morning turning away from surveying poor Queequeg -- Oh, devilish tantalization of the gods!
The sight of them set Jurgis to thinking again of the man's sarcastic remark; and half involuntarily he found himself watching the cars-- with the result that he gave a sudden startled exclamation, and stopped short in his tracks.