exclusion principle


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exclusion principle

n.
The principle that two particles of a given type, such as electrons, protons, or neutrons, cannot simultaneously occupy a particular quantum state. Also called Pauli exclusion principle.

exclusion principle

n
(Atomic Physics) See Pauli exclusion principle

exclu′sion prin`ciple



n.
the quantum-mechanical principle that no two identical particles having spin equal to half an odd integer can be in the same quantum state.
Also called Pauli exclusion principle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exclusion principle - no two electrons or protons or neutrons in a given system can be in states characterized by the same set of quantum numbers
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
References in periodicals archive ?
The reason for this is that the Pauli Exclusion Principle states that two identical fermions - a class of particles that neutrons and protons belong to - cannot share the same quantum state, and therefore a structure composed solely of four neutrons, or even two, three, or five neutrons, cannot be a stable one.
1] F A Deeney and J P O'Leary 2012 The effects of the Pauli exclusion principle in determining the ionization energies of the helium atom and helium like ions Eur.
The following robust stability tests of the resulting closed-loop characteristic polynomials with affine linear uncertainty structure utilize the combination of the value set concept and the zero exclusion principle [7].
Then there is the question: whether or not that in some cases the exclusion principle is also invalid for fermions?
Since the electric wires are essentially one-dimensional, the effect of the Pauli exclusion principle is dramatic, comparable to an accident on a single-lane road that brings traffic to a standstill.
However, the application of the exclusion principle could avoid the problem, said U.
In 'Explanatory Realism, Causal Realism and Explanatory Exclusion', the exclusion principle pertains to explanations.
Following the Pauli exclusion principle, each configuration should not contain two or more identical single particle quantum states of the same Dirac particle.
Feynman desperately sought to discover a law or theorem as true and useful as Pauli's quantum-mechanical Exclusion Principle (explaining the behavior of subatomic particles) and eventually said that his own ideas were useful but not profound.
The 14 chapters begin with the theory of relativity and continue through configuration of the atom, quantum state of atoms, electron spin, the Pauli exclusion principle, X-rays, and other topics, ending with a chapter on high-energy physics.
3) For example, in chapter 2, he says "indistinguishability leads directly to the famous Pauli exclusion principle (not true--one also needs the fermionic nature of electrons) and in chapter 6, he tells us that an "elevator's acceleration due to gravity cancels the gravitational force, and the freely falling elevator becomes an inertial reference frame" (gravity--that is, the curvature of space--causes the acceleration, rather than canceling it; by "inertial frame" we usually mean a non-accelerating frame).
Non-Reductive Physicalism and the Limits of the Exclusion Principle, CHRISTIAN LIST and PETER MENZIES