exclusion principle


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exclusion principle

n.
The principle that two particles of a given type, such as electrons, protons, or neutrons, cannot simultaneously occupy a particular quantum state. Also called Pauli exclusion principle.

exclusion principle

n
(Atomic Physics) See Pauli exclusion principle

exclu′sion prin`ciple



n.
the quantum-mechanical principle that no two identical particles having spin equal to half an odd integer can be in the same quantum state.
Also called Pauli exclusion principle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exclusion principle - no two electrons or protons or neutrons in a given system can be in states characterized by the same set of quantum numbers
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to producing unusual atomic states, the proposed violation of the exclusion principle relates to two important questions in modern particle physics, the many-dimensioned or Kaluza-Klein theories and the CPT theorem.
The exclusion principle forces them to follow the Fermi-Dirac statistical law, under which their wave functions can be positive part of the time and negative part of the time.
1] F A Deeney and J P O'Leary 2012 The effects of the Pauli exclusion principle in determining the ionization energies of the helium atom and helium like ions Eur.
Since the electric wires are essentially one-dimensional, the effect of the Pauli exclusion principle is dramatic, comparable to an accident on a single-lane road that brings traffic to a standstill.
In 'Explanatory Realism, Causal Realism and Explanatory Exclusion', the exclusion principle pertains to explanations.
Following the Pauli exclusion principle, each configuration should not contain two or more identical single particle quantum states of the same Dirac particle.
Feynman desperately sought to discover a law or theorem as true and useful as Pauli's quantum-mechanical Exclusion Principle (explaining the behavior of subatomic particles) and eventually said that his own ideas were useful but not profound.