exclusionist

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ex·clu·sion·ist

 (ĭk-sklo͞o′zhə-nĭst)
n.
One that advocates the exclusion of another or others, as from having or exercising a right or privilege.

ex·clu′sion·ism n.
ex·clu′sion·ist, ex·clu′sion·is′tic adj.

exclusionist

(ɪkˈskluːʒənɪst)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) chiefly US denoting or relating to a policy of excluding various types of immigrants, imports, etc
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a supporter of a policy of exclusion
exˈclusionˌism n
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References in classic literature ?
The exclusionist in religion does not see that he shuts the door of heaven on himself, in striving to shut out others.
You stand in-between two feuding powers -- the old shogunate, which has long been in control, and the growing forces of the imperial exclusionists, who wish to restore power to the emperor.
140) In this fiercely anti-Asian context, exclusionists vigorously challenged the citizenship status of American-born individuals of Chinese descent, and immigration officials attempted to use the exclusion laws to bar the entry of American-born citizens of Chinese descent returning from sojourns abroad.
most disconcerting, perhaps, is me fact that this group's power grab was as bold and shocking as the exclusionists before them.
The Muslim Brotherhood has the right to have supporters, sympathizers and allies, but only as long as they are not "terrorists", "advocates of violence", exclusionists or takfiri (who accuse others of apostasy).
Subsequently, it is more difficult to explain the conflicts about race within the labour movement, with its internationalists on the left and hardened exclusionists on the right.
The two groups occupying clearly differentiated positions appeared during this period: the assimilationists, who supported the peaceful evangelisation of new converts; and exclusionists, who supported the elimination of this group.
Exclusionists on both sides are relentlessly trying to steer these linkages in the direction of clash and confrontation.
30) Kiely's now rather bludgeoning insistence on origins, on the symbiosis between Carleton and territory, is an implicit response to potential exclusionists, and is in turn evidence of Kiely's generous and inclusive critical attitude which is then extended to Carleton's contemporaries, and to his successors.
Exclusionists deny immigrants the choice to maintain their heritage culture and believe that immigrants may never be incorporated culturally or socially as rightful members of the host society.
On the other side, an articulate group of exclusionists - many of whom claim the authority of the Christian faith - insist that civil marriage must remain the prerogative of heterosexuals only.
You stand in-between two feuding powers -- the old shogunate, who has long been in control, and the growing forces of the imperial exclusionists, who wish to restore power to the emperor.