excoriate


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ex·co·ri·ate

 (ĭk-skôr′ē-āt′)
tr.v. ex·co·ri·at·ed, ex·co·ri·at·ing, ex·co·ri·ates
1.
a. To censure strongly; denounce: "preparing to excoriate him for his insufficient preparations" (Neil Bascomb).
b. To criticize (something) harshly: "After excoriating the vapid culture of movie-star worship ... he's ended up at that trough" (Maureen Dowd).
2. To tear, scrape, or wear off (the skin).

[Middle English excoriaten, from Latin excoriāre, excoriāt- : ex-, ex- + corium, skin; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·co′ri·a′tion n.
ex·co′ri·a′tor n.
Usage Note: Traditionally, one excoriates people, not things, but in recent years the verb has been given a wider variety of objects, and the Usage Panel does not object. In our 2002 survey, 83 percent of the Panel accepted the sentence The party's national convention and its platform were excoriated by a contemptuous press, where the verb acts upon products of human effort.

excoriate

(ɪkˈskɔːrɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to strip (the skin) from (a person or animal); flay
2. (Medicine) med to lose (a superficial area of skin), as by scratching, the application of chemicals, etc
3. to denounce vehemently; censure severely
[C15: from Late Latin excoriāre to strip, flay, from Latin corium skin, hide]
exˌcoriˈation n

ex•co•ri•ate

(ɪkˈskɔr iˌeɪt, -ˈskoʊr-)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to denounce or berate severely: He was excoriated for his mistakes.
2. to strip off or remove the skin from.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin excoriātus, past participle of excoriāre to strip, skin]
ex•co`ri•a′tion, n.

excoriate


Past participle: excoriated
Gerund: excoriating

Imperative
excoriate
excoriate
Present
I excoriate
you excoriate
he/she/it excoriates
we excoriate
you excoriate
they excoriate
Preterite
I excoriated
you excoriated
he/she/it excoriated
we excoriated
you excoriated
they excoriated
Present Continuous
I am excoriating
you are excoriating
he/she/it is excoriating
we are excoriating
you are excoriating
they are excoriating
Present Perfect
I have excoriated
you have excoriated
he/she/it has excoriated
we have excoriated
you have excoriated
they have excoriated
Past Continuous
I was excoriating
you were excoriating
he/she/it was excoriating
we were excoriating
you were excoriating
they were excoriating
Past Perfect
I had excoriated
you had excoriated
he/she/it had excoriated
we had excoriated
you had excoriated
they had excoriated
Future
I will excoriate
you will excoriate
he/she/it will excoriate
we will excoriate
you will excoriate
they will excoriate
Future Perfect
I will have excoriated
you will have excoriated
he/she/it will have excoriated
we will have excoriated
you will have excoriated
they will have excoriated
Future Continuous
I will be excoriating
you will be excoriating
he/she/it will be excoriating
we will be excoriating
you will be excoriating
they will be excoriating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been excoriating
you have been excoriating
he/she/it has been excoriating
we have been excoriating
you have been excoriating
they have been excoriating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been excoriating
you will have been excoriating
he/she/it will have been excoriating
we will have been excoriating
you will have been excoriating
they will have been excoriating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been excoriating
you had been excoriating
he/she/it had been excoriating
we had been excoriating
you had been excoriating
they had been excoriating
Conditional
I would excoriate
you would excoriate
he/she/it would excoriate
we would excoriate
you would excoriate
they would excoriate
Past Conditional
I would have excoriated
you would have excoriated
he/she/it would have excoriated
we would have excoriated
you would have excoriated
they would have excoriated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.excoriate - express strong disapproval of; "We condemn the racism in South Africa"; "These ideas were reprobated"
denounce - speak out against; "He denounced the Nazis"
2.excoriate - tear or wear off the skin or make sore by abrading; "This leash chafes the dog's neck"

excoriate

verb
1. To make (the skin) raw by or as if by friction:
2. To criticize harshly and devastatingly:
Informal: roast.
Slang: slam.
Idioms: burn someone's ears, crawl all over, pin someone's ears back, put someone on the griddle, put someone on the hot seat, rake over the coals, read the riot act to.
Translations

excoriate

[ɪksˈkɔːrɪeɪt] VT (frm) [+ person, organization, idea] → vilipendiar

excoriate

vt (form: = criticize severely) person, organizationattackieren; ideaverurteilen

excoriate

vt excoriar
References in classic literature ?
As he rubs himself upon a large jack-towel, blowing like a military sort of diver just come up, his hair curling tighter and tighter on his sunburnt temples the more he rubs it so that it looks as if it never could be loosened by any less coercive instrument than an iron rake or a curry-comb--as he rubs, and puffs, and polishes, and blows, turning his head from side to side the more conveniently to excoriate his throat, and standing with his body well bent forward to keep the wet from his martial legs, Phil, on his knees lighting a fire, looks round as if it were enough washing for him to see all that done, and sufficient renovation for one day to take in the superfluous health his master throws off.
Every blow that shakes it will serve to harden it against a future stroke; as constant labour thickens the skin of the hand, and strengthens its muscles instead of wasting them away: so that a day of arduous toil, that might excoriate a lady's palm, would make no sensible impression on that of a hardy ploughman.
Of the series, Sigma Delta Chi judges said: "There are editorial campaigns that excoriate government officials, take on corporate giants or help free the unjustly incarcerated.
To be sure, it is proper to excoriate (as Egan does) the government boosters who lured homesteaders to the southern Plains on false premises, and the federal officials who responded with aching slowness to the unfolding catastrophe.
And it's very helpful to excoriate President Bush for his many big lies in the lead up to the invasion of Iraq.
Miller, a Democrat set to retire after his term expires early next year, used 12 minutes on the Senate floor in mid-February to excoriate popular culture and declare that the nation suffers from "a deficit of decency.
And the Orthodox metropolitan said he refused to discuss politics, then proceeded to excoriate politicians whom he blames for the war and continuing problems.
Rather than being present for a floor vote, Cannon used the time to excoriate immigration reform activists Roy Beck of Numbers USA Foundation and Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies "about the connections to John Tanton, former Zero Population Growth president and founder of the Federation of Immigration Reform.
This season, Paramount is giving the confrontational counselor her own TV show, so 90 percent of the nation's households will soon be able to watch "America's mommy" preach, nag, and excoriate her lucky guests in living color.