excoriate

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ex·co·ri·ate

 (ĭk-skôr′ē-āt′)
tr.v. ex·co·ri·at·ed, ex·co·ri·at·ing, ex·co·ri·ates
1.
a. To censure strongly; denounce: "preparing to excoriate him for his insufficient preparations" (Neil Bascomb).
b. To criticize (something) harshly: "After excoriating the vapid culture of movie-star worship ... he's ended up at that trough" (Maureen Dowd).
2. To tear, scrape, or wear off (the skin).

[Middle English excoriaten, from Latin excoriāre, excoriāt- : ex-, ex- + corium, skin; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·co′ri·a′tion n.
ex·co′ri·a′tor n.
Usage Note: Traditionally, one excoriates people, not things, but in recent years the verb has been given a wider variety of objects, and the Usage Panel does not object. In our 2002 survey, 83 percent of the Panel accepted the sentence The party's national convention and its platform were excoriated by a contemptuous press, where the verb acts upon products of human effort.

excoriate

(ɪkˈskɔːrɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to strip (the skin) from (a person or animal); flay
2. (Medicine) med to lose (a superficial area of skin), as by scratching, the application of chemicals, etc
3. to denounce vehemently; censure severely
[C15: from Late Latin excoriāre to strip, flay, from Latin corium skin, hide]
exˌcoriˈation n

ex•co•ri•ate

(ɪkˈskɔr iˌeɪt, -ˈskoʊr-)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to denounce or berate severely: He was excoriated for his mistakes.
2. to strip off or remove the skin from.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin excoriātus, past participle of excoriāre to strip, skin]
ex•co`ri•a′tion, n.

excoriate


Past participle: excoriated
Gerund: excoriating

Imperative
excoriate
excoriate
Present
I excoriate
you excoriate
he/she/it excoriates
we excoriate
you excoriate
they excoriate
Preterite
I excoriated
you excoriated
he/she/it excoriated
we excoriated
you excoriated
they excoriated
Present Continuous
I am excoriating
you are excoriating
he/she/it is excoriating
we are excoriating
you are excoriating
they are excoriating
Present Perfect
I have excoriated
you have excoriated
he/she/it has excoriated
we have excoriated
you have excoriated
they have excoriated
Past Continuous
I was excoriating
you were excoriating
he/she/it was excoriating
we were excoriating
you were excoriating
they were excoriating
Past Perfect
I had excoriated
you had excoriated
he/she/it had excoriated
we had excoriated
you had excoriated
they had excoriated
Future
I will excoriate
you will excoriate
he/she/it will excoriate
we will excoriate
you will excoriate
they will excoriate
Future Perfect
I will have excoriated
you will have excoriated
he/she/it will have excoriated
we will have excoriated
you will have excoriated
they will have excoriated
Future Continuous
I will be excoriating
you will be excoriating
he/she/it will be excoriating
we will be excoriating
you will be excoriating
they will be excoriating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been excoriating
you have been excoriating
he/she/it has been excoriating
we have been excoriating
you have been excoriating
they have been excoriating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been excoriating
you will have been excoriating
he/she/it will have been excoriating
we will have been excoriating
you will have been excoriating
they will have been excoriating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been excoriating
you had been excoriating
he/she/it had been excoriating
we had been excoriating
you had been excoriating
they had been excoriating
Conditional
I would excoriate
you would excoriate
he/she/it would excoriate
we would excoriate
you would excoriate
they would excoriate
Past Conditional
I would have excoriated
you would have excoriated
he/she/it would have excoriated
we would have excoriated
you would have excoriated
they would have excoriated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.excoriate - express strong disapproval of; "We condemn the racism in South Africa"; "These ideas were reprobated"
denounce - speak out against; "He denounced the Nazis"
2.excoriate - tear or wear off the skin or make sore by abrading; "This leash chafes the dog's neck"

excoriate

verb
1. To make (the skin) raw by or as if by friction:
2. To criticize harshly and devastatingly:
Informal: roast.
Slang: slam.
Idioms: burn someone's ears, crawl all over, pin someone's ears back, put someone on the griddle, put someone on the hot seat, rake over the coals, read the riot act to.
Translations

excoriate

[ɪksˈkɔːrɪeɪt] VT (frm) [+ person, organization, idea] → vilipendiar

excoriate

vt (form: = criticize severely) person, organizationattackieren; ideaverurteilen

excoriate

vt excoriar
References in classic literature ?
Upon examining it, many excoriations were perceived, no doubt occasioned by the violence with which it had been thrust up and disengaged.
Fixing my eyes steadily upon his left cheek, which was traversed by four parallel excoriations showing blood, I said:
Skin excoriations over her neck, face, and head showed superficial tissue breakdown in keeping with proteolytic enzyme secretions of maggots.
Commonly, this will lead to excoriations, ulcerations, erosions, hair loss, dermatitis and, in some cases, serious secondary infections.
Yet with the baggage too, the labels and excoriations of those who refuse to acknowledge him as a Special One but who instead wish to castigate and condemn.
Tsubota k, et al was applied daily topical blood serum drops over superficial corneal excoriations and reported its positive effects on their healing [22,23].
In Europe today, impatient Greeks have doubtless derived some encouragement from excoriations of bankers' foolishness by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy.
Similarly, cutaneous crusting and debris from scratches and excoriations might be misinterpreted as pathogens that emerged from the skin.
Van Moffaert MM: The spectrum of dermatological self-mutilation and self-destruction including dermatitis artefacta and neurotic excoriations.
Cognitive-behavioral techniques that address dysfunctional cognitions (thought patterns) or behaviors (actions) can be useful for skin disorders with a significant psychosomatic or behavioral component, such as the picking component of acne excoriee, scratching in atopic dermatitis, habits such as lip licking or biting, hyperhidrosis, lichen simplex chronicus, neurotic excoriations, onychotillomania, trichotillomania, and psychosomatic triggering or exacerbation of urticaria.