excreta

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ex·cre·ta

 (ĭk-skrē′tə)
pl.n.
Waste matter, such as sweat, urine, or feces, discharged from the body.

[Latin excrēta, from neuter pl. past participle of excernere, to excrete; see excrete.]

ex·cre′tal adj.

excreta

(ɪkˈskriːtə)
pl n
(Physiology) waste matter, such as urine, faeces, or sweat, discharged from the body; excrement
[C19: New Latin, from Latin excernere to excrete]
exˈcretal adj

ex•cre•ta

(ɪkˈskri tə)

n.pl.
excreted matter, as urine.
[1855–60; < Latin excrēta chaff, neuter pl. of excrētus]
ex•cre′tal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excreta - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the bodyexcreta - waste matter (as urine or sweat but especially feces) discharged from the body
faecal matter, faeces, fecal matter, feces, ordure, BM, dejection, stool - solid excretory product evacuated from the bowels
fecula - excreta (especially of insects)
wormcast - cylindrical mass of earth voided by a burrowing earthworm or lugworm
human waste - the body wastes of human beings
pee, piddle, piss, urine, weewee, water - liquid excretory product; "there was blood in his urine"; "the child had to make water"
barf, vomit, vomitus, puke - the matter ejected in vomiting
waste, waste material, waste matter, waste product - any materials unused and rejected as worthless or unwanted; "they collect the waste once a week"; "much of the waste material is carried off in the sewers"
guano - the excrement of sea birds; used as fertilizer
Translations

excreta

[eksˈkriːtə] NPLexcremento msing

excreta

plExkremente pl

excreta

[ɪksˈkriːtə] npl (frm) → escrementi mpl, escrezioni fpl
References in periodicals archive ?
Retained to direct the sanitation laboratory, he contemplated using the antigens as vaccine, but that proved to be a nonstarter: to inoculate Aryans with an excretal product of diseased non-Aryans was unconscionable to his Nazi controllers.
Effective sampling can be affected by poor soil contact, position in the landscape, heterogeneity of soil, any contamination with excretal returns and the small soil volume from which samples can be obtained.
On an annual basis, less than 35% of pasture areas receive excretal N; some areas receive one or more applications (overlapping of excreta).