excursion


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ex·cur·sion

 (ĭk-skûr′zhən)
n.
1. A usually short journey made for pleasure; an outing.
2. A roundtrip in a passenger vehicle at a special low fare.
3. A group taking a short pleasure trip together.
4. A diversion or deviation from a main topic; a digression.
5. Physics
a. A movement from and back to a mean position or axis in an oscillating or alternating motion.
b. The distance traversed in such a movement.

[Latin excursiō, excursiōn-, from excursus, past participle of excurrere, to run out : ex-, ex- + currere, to run; see kers- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

excursion

(ɪkˈskɜːʃən; -ʒən)
n
1. a short outward and return journey, esp for relaxation, sightseeing, etc; outing
2. a group of people going on such a journey
3. (Railways) (modifier) of or relating to special reduced rates offered on certain journeys by rail: an excursion ticket.
4. a digression or deviation; diversion: an excursion into politics.
5. (Military) (formerly) a raid or attack
6. (General Physics) physics
a. a movement from an equilibrium position, as in an oscillation
b. the magnitude of this displacement
7. (Physiology) the normal movement of a movable bodily organ or part from its resting position, such as the lateral movement of the lower jaw
8. (Mechanical Engineering) machinery the locus of a point on a moving part, esp the deflection of a whirling shaft
[C16: from Latin excursiō an attack, from excurrere to run out, from currere to run]

ex•cur•sion

(ɪkˈskɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. a short trip or outing to some place.
2. the persons making such a trip.
3. a trip on a train, ship, etc., at a reduced rate.
4. a deviation or digression.
5. the displacement of a body or a point from a mean position or neutral value, as in an oscillation.
6. an accidental increase in the power level of a reactor, usu. forcing its emergency shutdown.
[1565–75; < Latin excursiō sortie, journey]
ex•cur′sion•al, ex•cur′sion•ar′y, adj.

journey

tripvoyageexcursion
1. 'journey'

A journey is the process of travelling from one place to another by land, air, or sea.

There is a direct train from London Paddington to Penzance. The journey takes around 5 hours.
This service will save thousands of long-distance lorry journeys on Britain's roads.
2. 'trip'

A trip is the process of travelling from one place to another, staying there, usually for a short time, and coming back again.

Lucy is away on a business trip to Milan.
They went on a day trip to the seaside.
3. 'voyage'

A voyage is a long journey from one place to another in a ship or spacecraft.

The ship's voyage is over.
...the voyage to the moon in 1972.
4. 'excursion'

An excursion is a short trip made either as a tourist or in order to do a particular thing.

The tourist office organizes excursions to the palace.
5. verbs used with 'journey', 'trip', 'voyage' and 'excursion'

You make or go on a journey.

He made the long journey to India.

You take or go on a trip.

We took a bus trip to Manchester.

You make a voyage.

The ship made the 4,000-kilometre voyage across the Atlantic.

You go on an excursion.

Students went on an excursion to the Natural History Museum.

Be Careful!
Don't use 'do' with any of these words. Don't say, for example, 'We did a bus trip'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excursion - a journey taken for pleasureexcursion - a journey taken for pleasure; "many summer excursions to the shore"; "it was merely a pleasure trip"; "after cautious sashays into the field"
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another
airing - a short excursion (a walk or ride) in the open air; "he took the dogs for an airing"
field trip - a group excursion (to a museum or the woods or some historic place) for firsthand examination
2.excursion - wandering from the main path of a journeyexcursion - wandering from the main path of a journey
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another

excursion

noun
1. trip, airing, tour, journey, outing, expedition, ramble, day trip, jaunt, awayday, pleasure trip We also recommend a full day excursion to the Upper Douro.
2. digression, episode, wandering, deviation, detour, excursus All these alarms and excursions diverted attention from the main point of the meeting.

excursion

noun
1. A usually short journey taken for pleasure:
Translations
نُزْهَه، رِحْلَه، جَوْلَه
ekskursionturudflugt
skemmti- eîa skoîunarferî
ekskursijaišvyka
ekskursija
izlet

excursion

[ɪksˈkɜːʃən]
A. N (= journey) → excursión f (fig) → digresión f
B. CPD excursion ticket Nbillete m de excursión
excursion train Ntren m de recreo

excursion

[ɪkˈskɜːrʃən ɪkˈskɜːrʒən] n
(= trip) → excursion f
an excursion to → une excursion à
to go on an excursion → partir en excursion
to take sb on an excursion → emmener qn en excursion
an excursion into (fig) (= foray into) → une excursion dans

excursion

nAusflug m; (fig, into a subject also) → Exkurs m; to go on an excursioneinen Ausflug machen

excursion

:
excursion ticket
nverbilligte Fahrkarte (zu einem Ausflugsort)
excursion train
nSonderzug m

excursion

[ɪksˈkɜːʃn] n (journey) → escursione f, gita (fig) → digressione f

excursion

(ikˈskəːʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
a trip; an outing. an excursion to the seaside.
References in classic literature ?
When the chums returned from their sightseeing excursion, they found that Professor Bumper had arrived.
My roving excursion this day had fatigued my body, and diverted my imagination.
To console himself he had to drink a good deal, and he went back to Packingtown about two o'clock in the morning, very much the worse for his excursion, and, it must be confessed, entirely deserving the calamity that was in store for him.
His chief celebrity rested upon the events of an excursion like this one of mine, which he had once made with a damsel named Maledisant, who was as handy with her tongue as was Sandy, though in a different way, for her tongue churned forth only rail- ings and insult, whereas Sandy's music was of a kindlier sort.
We made the port of Necharsteinach in good season, and went to the hotel and ordered a trout dinner, the same to be ready against our return from a two-hour pedestrian excursion to the village and castle of Dilsberg, a mile distant, on the other side of the river.
Their intended excursion to Whitwell turned out very different from what Elinor had expected.
The next day was as fine as its predecessor: it was devoted by the party to an excursion to some site in the neighbourhood.
Linton took off the grey cloak of the dairy-maid which we had borrowed for our excursion, shaking her head and expostulating with her, I suppose: she was a young lady, and they made a distinction between her treatment and mine.
He is anxious to know if you will share the expense of a carriage, and give him the pleasure of your company and Miss Bygrave's company on this excursion.
Cruncher beguiled the earlier watches of the night with solitary pipes, and did not start upon his excursion until nearly one o'clock.
Well have ye judg'd, well ended long debate, Synod of Gods, and like to what ye are, Great things resolv'd; which from the lowest deep Will once more lift us up, in spight of Fate, Neerer our ancient Seat; perhaps in view Of those bright confines, whence with neighbouring Arms And opportune excursion we may chance Re-enter Heav'n; or else in some milde Zone Dwell not unvisited of Heav'ns fair Light Secure, and at the brightning Orient beam Purge off this gloom; the soft delicious Air, To heal the scarr of these corrosive Fires Shall breath her balme.
He hastened from the house, walked swiftly down the avenue to the lodge, where he kept his bicycle, left word there that he was going for an excursion and should probably not return in time for dinner, mounted, and sped away recklessly along the Riverside Road.