excursion

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ex·cur·sion

 (ĭk-skûr′zhən)
n.
1. A usually short journey made for pleasure; an outing.
2. A roundtrip in a passenger vehicle at a special low fare.
3. A group taking a short pleasure trip together.
4. A diversion or deviation from a main topic; a digression.
5. Physics
a. A movement from and back to a mean position or axis in an oscillating or alternating motion.
b. The distance traversed in such a movement.

[Latin excursiō, excursiōn-, from excursus, past participle of excurrere, to run out : ex-, ex- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

excursion

(ɪkˈskɜːʃən; -ʒən)
n
1. a short outward and return journey, esp for relaxation, sightseeing, etc; outing
2. a group of people going on such a journey
3. (Railways) (modifier) of or relating to special reduced rates offered on certain journeys by rail: an excursion ticket.
4. a digression or deviation; diversion: an excursion into politics.
5. (Military) (formerly) a raid or attack
6. (General Physics) physics
a. a movement from an equilibrium position, as in an oscillation
b. the magnitude of this displacement
7. (Physiology) the normal movement of a movable bodily organ or part from its resting position, such as the lateral movement of the lower jaw
8. (Mechanical Engineering) machinery the locus of a point on a moving part, esp the deflection of a whirling shaft
[C16: from Latin excursiō an attack, from excurrere to run out, from currere to run]

ex•cur•sion

(ɪkˈskɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. a short trip or outing to some place.
2. the persons making such a trip.
3. a trip on a train, ship, etc., at a reduced rate.
4. a deviation or digression.
5. the displacement of a body or a point from a mean position or neutral value, as in an oscillation.
6. an accidental increase in the power level of a reactor, usu. forcing its emergency shutdown.
[1565–75; < Latin excursiō sortie, journey]
ex•cur′sion•al, ex•cur′sion•ar′y, adj.

journey

tripvoyageexcursion
1. 'journey'

A journey is the process of travelling from one place to another by land, air, or sea.

There is a direct train from London Paddington to Penzance. The journey takes around 5 hours.
This service will save thousands of long-distance lorry journeys on Britain's roads.
2. 'trip'

A trip is the process of travelling from one place to another, staying there, usually for a short time, and coming back again.

Lucy is away on a business trip to Milan.
They went on a day trip to the seaside.
3. 'voyage'

A voyage is a long journey from one place to another in a ship or spacecraft.

The ship's voyage is over.
...the voyage to the moon in 1972.
4. 'excursion'

An excursion is a short trip made either as a tourist or in order to do a particular thing.

The tourist office organizes excursions to the palace.
5. verbs used with 'journey', 'trip', 'voyage' and 'excursion'

You make or go on a journey.

He made the long journey to India.

You take or go on a trip.

We took a bus trip to Manchester.

You make a voyage.

The ship made the 4,000-kilometre voyage across the Atlantic.

You go on an excursion.

Students went on an excursion to the Natural History Museum.

Be Careful!
Don't use 'do' with any of these words. Don't say, for example, 'We did a bus trip'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.excursion - a journey taken for pleasureexcursion - a journey taken for pleasure; "many summer excursions to the shore"; "it was merely a pleasure trip"; "after cautious sashays into the field"
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another
airing - a short excursion (a walk or ride) in the open air; "he took the dogs for an airing"
field trip - a group excursion (to a museum or the woods or some historic place) for firsthand examination
2.excursion - wandering from the main path of a journeyexcursion - wandering from the main path of a journey
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another

excursion

noun
1. trip, airing, tour, journey, outing, expedition, ramble, day trip, jaunt, awayday, pleasure trip We also recommend a full day excursion to the Upper Douro.
2. digression, episode, wandering, deviation, detour, excursus All these alarms and excursions diverted attention from the main point of the meeting.

excursion

noun
1. A usually short journey taken for pleasure:
Translations
نُزْهَه، رِحْلَه، جَوْلَه
ekskursionturudflugt
skemmti- eîa skoîunarferî
ekskursijaišvyka
ekskursija
izlet

excursion

[ɪksˈkɜːʃən]
A. N (= journey) → excursión f (fig) → digresión f
B. CPD excursion ticket Nbillete m de excursión
excursion train Ntren m de recreo

excursion

[ɪkˈskɜːrʃən ɪkˈskɜːrʒən] n
(= trip) → excursion f
an excursion to → une excursion à
to go on an excursion → partir en excursion
to take sb on an excursion → emmener qn en excursion
an excursion into (fig) (= foray into) → une excursion dans

excursion

nAusflug m; (fig, into a subject also) → Exkurs m; to go on an excursioneinen Ausflug machen

excursion

:
excursion ticket
nverbilligte Fahrkarte (zu einem Ausflugsort)
excursion train
nSonderzug m

excursion

[ɪksˈkɜːʃn] n (journey) → escursione f, gita (fig) → digressione f

excursion

(ikˈskəːʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
a trip; an outing. an excursion to the seaside.
References in classic literature ?
The excursionists will have an opportunity to look over this, the "magnificent city of palaces," and visit the birthplace of Columbus, twelve miles off, over a beautiful road built by Napoleon I.
The ship will at all times be a home, where the excursionists, if sick, will be surrounded by kind friends, and have all possible comfort and sympathy.
This supplementary program also instructed the excursionists to provide themselves with light musical instruments for amusement in the ship, with saddles for Syrian travel, green spectacles and umbrellas, veils for Egypt, and substantial clothing to use in rough pilgrimizing in the Holy Land.
I was provided with a receipt and duly and officially accepted as an excursionist.
Coming home, a party of excursionists from Chertsey or Isleworth passed us singing and playing music.
There was a large enclosed yard in front of the hotel, and this was filled with groups of villagers waiting to see the diligences arrive, or to hire themselves to excursionists for the morrow.
The waves were colourless, and the Bournemouth steamer gave a further touch of insipidity, drawn up against the pier and hooting wildly for excursionists.
Bert stood there in the middle of the bridge, in a place that most people who knew it remembered as a place populous with sightseers and excursionists, and he was the only human being in sight there.
And so, as seven tourist buses made their way out of Bacolod City and out into the still vast and expansive sugarlands of Negros on the morning of the second day, the sun came out and cheered the excursionists who were only too happy to bask in the hot and humid climate.
The Americans among the excursionists found themselves wholly unable to agree with this interpretation.
Thompson & Allen Seager, "Bringing In the Sheaves: The Harvest Excursionists, 1890-1928," Canadian Historical Review 58, 4 (1978): 467-498; John H.
The forestry department also called on excursionists to avoid throwing matches and cigarette butts while in the countryside and that lighting a fire for barbecues is allowed only in the designated areas within organised picnic areas.