execration


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ex·e·cra·tion

 (ĕk′sĭ-krā′shən)
n.
1. The act of cursing.
2. A curse.
3. Something that is cursed or loathed.

ex•e•cra•tion

(ˌɛk sɪˈkreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of execrating.
2. a curse or imprecation.
3. the object execrated; a thing held in abomination.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.execration - hate coupled with disgustexecration - hate coupled with disgust    
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
2.execration - an appeal to some supernatural power to inflict evil on someone or some group
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
anathema - a formal ecclesiastical curse accompanied by excommunication
imprecation, malediction - the act of calling down a curse that invokes evil (and usually serves as an insult); "he suffered the imprecations of the mob"
3.execration - the object of cursing or detestation; that which is execrated
object - the focus of cognitions or feelings; "objects of thought"; "the object of my affection"

execration

noun
1. A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
2. An object of extreme dislike:
Informal: horror.
Translations

execration

[ˌeksɪˈkreɪʃən] N (frm) → execración f (frm), abominación f (frm)

execration

n
(= hatred)Abscheu m
(= curse)Fluch m, → Verwünschung f

execration

[ˌɛksɪˈkreɪʃn] n (frm) → esecrazione f
References in classic literature ?
Felton only expressed, with regard to the duke, the feeling of execration which all the English had declared toward him whom the Catholics themselves called the extortioner, the pillager, the debauchee, and whom the Puritans styled simply Satan.
emerged from a general roar of amusement or execration.
The quick vision that his life was after all a failure, that he was a dishonored man, and must quail before the glance of those towards whom he had habitually assumed the attitude of a reprover--that God had disowned him before men and left him unscreened to the triumphant scorn of those who were glad to have their hatred justified--the sense of utter futility in that equivocation with his conscience in dealing with the life of his accomplice, an equivocation which now turned venomously upon him with the full-grown fang of a discovered lie:-- all this rushed through him like the agony of terror which fails to kill, and leaves the ears still open to the returning wave of execration.
So with a muttered execration I left the fellow to his fate, and clapping spurs to my own horse, galloped away, excited by a combination of feelings it would not be easy to analyse; and perhaps, if I did so, the result would not be very creditable to my disposition; for I am not sure that a species of exultation in what I had done was not one principal concomitant.
And not only need we breathe and exercise the soul by assuming the penalties of abstinence, of debt, of solitude, of unpopularity,--but it behooves the wise man to look with a bold eye into those rarer dangers which sometimes invade men, and to familiarize himself with disgusting forms of disease, with sounds of execration, and the vision of violent death.
It was as the ass and the lap-dog; yet surely the gentle ass whose intentions were affectionate, although his manners were rude, deserved better treatment than blows and execration.
A black-haired, black-eyed man with the roguish face of a satyr, who, Saxon learned, was an artist who sold his paintings at five hundred apiece, brought on himself universa1 execration and acclamation by singing:
Yes," he continued, with a contemptuous smile, "the blowing up of the first meridian is bound to raise a howl of execration.
Oh, my friends and fellow- countrymen, the down-trodden operatives of Coketown, oh, my fellow- brothers and fellow-workmen and fellow-citizens and fellowmen, what a to-do was there, when Slackbridge unfolded what he called 'that damning document,' and held it up to the gaze, and for the execration of the working-man community
So, the talk, lashed louder and higher by confirmation on confirmation, and by edition after edition of the evening papers, swelled into such a roar when night came, as might have brought one to believe that a solitary watcher on the gallery above the Dome of St Paul's would have perceived the night air to be laden with a heavy muttering of the name of Merdle, coupled with every form of execration.
It was sufficient to know that while they were proceeding, the concourse without still lingered round the house; that boys beat upon the drum with their fists, and imitated Punch with their tender voices; that the office-window was rendered opaque by flattened noses, and the key-hole of the street-door luminous with eyes; that every time the single gentleman or either of his guests was seen at the upper window, or so much as the end of one of their noses was visible, there was a great shout of execration from the excluded mob, who remained howling and yelling, and refusing consolation, until the exhibitors were delivered up to them to be attended elsewhere.
He gazed at the most appalling sight with eyes and muscles that knew not how to waver, but with execrations so bitter and deep as to denote how much he denounced the crime of his enemies.