executing


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ex·e·cute

 (ĕk′sĭ-kyo͞ot′)
tr.v. ex·e·cut·ed, ex·e·cut·ing, ex·e·cutes
1. To put into effect; carry out: a government that executes the decisions of the ruling party.
2. To perform; do: execute a U-turn. See Synonyms at perform.
3. To create (a work of art, for example) in accordance with a prescribed design.
4. To make valid, as by signing: execute a deed.
5. To perform or carry out what is required by: execute the terms of a will.
6. To put to death, especially by carrying out a lawful sentence.
7. Computers To run (a program or instruction).

[Middle English executen, from Old French executer, from Medieval Latin execūtāre, from Latin execūtor, executor, from execūtus, past participle of exequī, exsequī, to pursue, carry out : ex-, ex- + sequī, to follow; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

ex′e·cut′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.executing - putting a condemned person to deathexecuting - putting a condemned person to death
corporal punishment - the infliction of physical injury on someone convicted of committing a crime
burning at the stake, burning - execution by fire
hanging - a form of capital punishment; victim is suspended by the neck from a gallows or gibbet until dead; "in those days the hanging of criminals was a public entertainment"
electrocution, burning - execution by electricity
beheading, decapitation - execution by cutting off the victim's head
crucifixion - the act of executing by a method widespread in the ancient world; the victim's hands and feet are bound or nailed to a cross
Translations
References in classic literature ?
She took Edna's hand between her strong wiry fingers, holding it loosely without warmth, and executing a sort of double theme upon the back and palm.
When it terminated, the three instantly set about executing their new resolutions.
Jim Crow, moreover, was seen executing his world-renowned dance, in gingerbread.
He was boat and captain and engine-bells combined, so he had to imagine himself standing on his own hurricane-deck giving the orders and executing them:
Might he be trusted with the commission, what infinite pleasure should he have in executing it
After a momentary doubt, I decided on executing the new commission.
He walked me up to my room slowly and gravely - I am certain he had a delight in that formal parade of executing justice - and when we got there, suddenly twisted my head under his arm.
But there is still indeed a more weighty reason, why the kings of this country have been always averse from executing so terrible an action, unless upon the utmost necessity.
The Emperor had sent a viceroy into this province, whose firm attachment to the Roman Church, as well as great abilities in military affairs, made him a person very capable of executing the orders of the Emperor, and of suppressing any insurrection that might be raised, to prevent those alterations in religion which they were designed to promote: a farther view in the choice of so warlike a deputy was that a stop might be put to the inroads of the Galles, who had killed one viceroy, and in a little time after killed this.
Four skillful tabor and flute players accompanied them, and the dance having been opened, Cupid, after executing two figures, raised his eyes and bent his bow against a damsel who stood between the turrets of the castle, and thus addressed her:
No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws, and the net produce of all duties and imposts laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the Congress.
Night came, and Passepartout re-entered the native quarter, where he wandered through the streets, lit by vari-coloured lanterns, looking on at the dancers, who were executing skilful steps and boundings, and the astrologers who stood in the open air with their telescopes.