exemption


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Related to exemption: Tax exemption

ex·emp·tion

 (ĭg-zĕmp′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of exempting.
b. The state of being exempt; immunity.
2. An exception to the ordinary operation of law, as:
a. An exception of certain property from bankruptcy or taxation.
b. The deduction of a certain amount in the computation of net income with regard to taxation, allowed for an individual, that individual's dependents, and certain characteristics, such as blindness or age.
c. Excuse from performance of a legal duty, such as release from serving in the military or as a juror.

ex•emp•tion

(ɪgˈzɛmp ʃən)

n.
1. the circumstances of a taxpayer, as age or number of dependents, that permit certain deductions to be made from taxable income.
2. the act of exempting.
3. the state of being exempted; immunity.
[1400–50; < Latin]
ex•emp′tive, adj.
syn: exemption, immunity, impunity imply special privilege or freedom from requirements imposed on others. exemption implies release or privileged freedom from sharing with others some duty or legal requirement: exemption from military service. immunity implies freedom from a penalty or from some natural or common liability, esp. one that is disagreeable or threatening: immunity from prosecution; immunity from disease. impunity (limited mainly to the expression with impunity) suggests freedom from punishment: The police force was so inadequate that crimes could be committed with impunity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exemption - immunity from an obligation or duty
immunity, unsusceptibility - the state of not being susceptible; "unsusceptibility to rust"
amnesty - a period during which offenders are exempt from punishment
diplomatic immunity - exemption from taxation or normal processes of law that is offered to diplomatic personnel in a foreign country
indemnity - legal exemption from liability for damages
impunity - exemption from punishment or loss
grandfather clause - an exemption based on circumstances existing prior to the adoption of some policy; used to enfranchise illiterate whites in south after the American Civil War
2.exemption - a deduction allowed to a taxpayer because of his status (having certain dependents or being blind or being over 65 etc.); "additional exemptions are allowed for each dependent"
deduction, tax deduction, tax write-off - a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculated; reduces taxes by the percentage fixed for the taxpayer's income bracket
3.exemption - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"
waiver, discharge, release - a formal written statement of relinquishment
fix - an exemption granted after influence (e.g., money) is brought to bear; "collusion resulted in tax fixes for gamblers"
official immunity - personal immunity accorded to a public official from liability to anyone injured by actions that are the consequence of exerting official authority
sovereign immunity - an exemption that precludes bringing a suit against the sovereign government without the government's consent; "the doctrine of sovereign immunity originated with the maxim that the king can do no wrong"
testimonial immunity, use immunity - an exemption that displaces the privilege against self-incrimination; neither compelled testimony or any fruits of it can be used against the witness who therefore can no longer fear self-incrimination

exemption

noun immunity, freedom, privilege, relief, exception, discharge, release, dispensation, absolution, exoneration new exemptions for students and the unwaged
Translations
إعْفاء
fritagelse
mentesítés
undanòága

exemption

[ɪgˈzempʃən]
A. Nexención f (from de) tax exemptionexención f de impuestos, exención f tributaria
B. CPD exemption certificate Ncertificado m de exención

exemption

[ɪgˈzɛmpʃən] nexemption f, dispense fexemption clause n (in contract)clause f de non-responsabilité

exemption

nBefreiung f; exemption from taxesSteuerfreiheit f

exemption

[ɪgˈzɛmpʃn] n (see adj) → esenzione f, esonero

exempt

(igˈzempt) verb
to free (a person) from a duty that other people have to carry out. He was exempted from military service.
adjective
free (from a duty etc). Children under 16 are exempt from the usual charges for dental treatment.
exˈemption (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
But, emulating the patience and self-denial of the practiced native warriors, they learned to overcome every difficulty; and it would seem that, in time, there was no recess of the woods so dark, nor any secret place so lovely, that it might claim exemption from the inroads of those who had pledged their blood to satiate their vengeance, or to uphold the cold and selfish policy of the distant monarchs of Europe.
What was settled between us, accordingly, that night, was that we thought we might bear things together; and I was not even sure that, in spite of her exemption, it was she who had the best of the burden.
Her own father's perfect exemption from any thought of the kind, the entire deficiency in him of all such sort of penetration or suspicion, was a most comfortable circumstance.
Again I claim exemption in this wandering history from all such descriptive drudgery upon second, third, and fourth dramatis personsonae as your thorough-going novelist must undertake with a good grace.
They claimed exemption from the mandates of human authority, as militating with their subjection to a superior power.
Have we not already seen enough of the fallacy and extravagance of those idle theories which have amused us with promises of an exemption from the imperfections, weaknesses and evils incident to society in every shape?
The first is, that the convention must have enjoyed, in a very singular degree, an exemption from the pestilential influence of party animosities the disease most incident to deliberative bodies, and most apt to contaminate their proceedings.
The hands of Fayaway were as soft and delicate as those of any countess; for an entire exemption from rude labour marks the girlhood and even prime of a Typee woman's life.
Elnathan was indebted for this exemption from labor in some measure to his extraordinary growth, which, leaving him pale, inanimate, and listless, induced his tender mother to pronounce him “a sickly boy, and one that was not equal to work, but who might earn a living comfortably enough by taking to pleading law, or turning minister, or doctoring, or some such like easy calling.
As the original design was to cross the British Channel, and alight as near Paris as possible, the voyagers had taken the precaution to prepare themselves with passports directed to all parts of the Continent, specifying the nature of the expedition, as in the case of the Nassau voyage, and entitling the adventurers to exemption from the usual formalities of office : unexpected events, however, rendered these passports superfluous.
But our institutions, though in coincidence with the spirit of the age, have not any exemption from the practical defects which have discredited other forms.
Fortunately, he could quench his thirst at any moment, and, in recalling the sufferings he had undergone in the desert, he experienced comparative relief in his exemption from that other distressing want.