exert


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ex·ert

 (ĭg-zûrt′)
tr.v. ex·ert·ed, ex·ert·ing, ex·erts
1. To put to use or effect; put forth: exerted all my strength to move the box.
2. To bring to bear; exercise: exert influence.
3. To put (oneself) to strenuous effort: exerted ourselves mightily to raise funds.

[Latin exserere, exsert-, to put forth, stretch out : ex-, ex- + serere, to join; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

exert

(ɪɡˈzɜːt)
vb (tr)
1. to use (influence, authority, etc) forcefully or effectively
2. to apply (oneself) diligently; make a strenuous effort
[C17 (in the sense: push forth, emit): from Latin exserere to thrust out, from ex-1 + serere to bind together, entwine]
exˈertion n
exˈertive adj

ex•ert

(ɪgˈzɜrt)

v.t.
1. to put forth or into use, as power; exercise, as ability or influence; put into vigorous action.
2. to put (oneself) into strenuous, vigorous action or effort.
[1650–60; < Latin ex(s)ertus, past participle of exserere to thrust out]
ex•er′tive, adj.

exert

- Can refer to a seed's pushing out or up.
See also related terms for pushing.

exert


Past participle: exerted
Gerund: exerting

Imperative
exert
exert
Present
I exert
you exert
he/she/it exerts
we exert
you exert
they exert
Preterite
I exerted
you exerted
he/she/it exerted
we exerted
you exerted
they exerted
Present Continuous
I am exerting
you are exerting
he/she/it is exerting
we are exerting
you are exerting
they are exerting
Present Perfect
I have exerted
you have exerted
he/she/it has exerted
we have exerted
you have exerted
they have exerted
Past Continuous
I was exerting
you were exerting
he/she/it was exerting
we were exerting
you were exerting
they were exerting
Past Perfect
I had exerted
you had exerted
he/she/it had exerted
we had exerted
you had exerted
they had exerted
Future
I will exert
you will exert
he/she/it will exert
we will exert
you will exert
they will exert
Future Perfect
I will have exerted
you will have exerted
he/she/it will have exerted
we will have exerted
you will have exerted
they will have exerted
Future Continuous
I will be exerting
you will be exerting
he/she/it will be exerting
we will be exerting
you will be exerting
they will be exerting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been exerting
you have been exerting
he/she/it has been exerting
we have been exerting
you have been exerting
they have been exerting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been exerting
you will have been exerting
he/she/it will have been exerting
we will have been exerting
you will have been exerting
they will have been exerting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been exerting
you had been exerting
he/she/it had been exerting
we had been exerting
you had been exerting
they had been exerting
Conditional
I would exert
you would exert
he/she/it would exert
we would exert
you would exert
they would exert
Past Conditional
I would have exerted
you would have exerted
he/she/it would have exerted
we would have exerted
you would have exerted
they would have exerted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.exert - put to use; "exert one's power or influence"
apply, employ, use, utilise, utilize - put into service; make work or employ for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose; "use your head!"; "we only use Spanish at home"; "I can't use this tool"; "Apply a magnetic field here"; "This thinking was applied to many projects"; "How do you utilize this tool?"; "I apply this rule to get good results"; "use the plastic bags to store the food"; "He doesn't know how to use a computer"
2.exert - have and exercise; "wield power and authority"
have, have got, hold - have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense; "She has $1,000 in the bank"; "He has got two beautiful daughters"; "She holds a Master's degree from Harvard"
3.exert - make a great effort at a mental or physical taskexert - make a great effort at a mental or physical task; "exert oneself"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
overexert - exert (oneself) excessively and go beyond one's strength; "don't overexert yourself when exercising!"

exert

verb apply, use, exercise, employ, wield, make use of, utilize, expend, bring to bear, put forth, bring into play He exerted all his considerable charm to get her to agree.
exert yourself make an effort, work, labour, struggle, strain, strive, endeavour, go for it (informal), try hard, toil, bend over backwards (informal), do your best, go for broke (slang), bust a gut (informal), spare no effort, make a great effort, give it your best shot (informal), break your neck (informal), apply yourself, put yourself out, make an all-out effort (informal), get your finger out (Brit. informal), pull your finger out (Brit. informal), knock yourself out (informal), do your damnedest (informal), give it your all (informal), rupture yourself (informal) He never exerts himself for other people.

exert

verb
To bring to bear steadily or forcefully:
Translations
يَبْذِلُ جُهْدَه، يُجْهِدُ نَفْسَهيُمارِس
udøve
beita sér, reyna af fremsta megnineyta, beita
panaudojimaspasistengti
ietekmētizrādītpiepūlētiessasprindzināt spēkus
çaba göstermekkullanmak

exert

[ɪgˈzɜːt] VT [+ strength, force] → emplear; [+ influence, authority] → ejercer
to exert o.s (physically) → esforzarse (to do sth por hacer algo) (= overdo things) → esforzarse or trabajar demasiado
don't exert yourself! (iro) → ¡no te vayas a quebrar or herniar! (iro)
he doesn't exert himself at allno hace el más mínimo esfuerzo

exert

[ɪgˈzɜːrt] vt
[+ influence, moral pressure] → exercer
to exert pressure on sb → exercer une pression sur qn
[+ physical pressure] → exercer; [+ force] → exercer
to exert pressure on sth → exercer une pression sur qch
to exert o.s. → se dépenser

exert

vt pressure, influence, power, controlausüben (→ on auf +acc); authorityaufbieten, einsetzen (on bei); forcegebrauchen, anwenden; to exert a force on somethingeine Kraft auf etw (acc)ausüben
vrsich anstrengen

exert

[ɪgˈzɜːt] vt (force) → impiegare; (influence, authority) → esercitare
to exert o.s (physically) → fare uno sforzo
don't exert yourself! (hum) → non sforzarti troppo!

exert

(igˈzəːt) verb
1. to bring forcefully into use or action. He likes to exert his authority.
2. to force (oneself) to make an effort. Please exert yourselves.
exˈertion (-ʃən) noun
1. the act of bringing forcefully into use. the exertion of one's influence.
2. (an) effort. They failed in spite of their exertions.

exert

vt to — oneself esforzarse, hacer esfuerzos
References in classic literature ?
Don't cry, dear, but just exert yourself a bit, and fix us up something to eat.
When the meal was ended, the scout cast a glance upward at the setting sun, and pushed forward with a rapidity which compelled Heyward and the still vigorous Munro to exert all their muscles to equal.
Crime is for the iron-nerved, who have their choice either to endure it, or, if it press too hard, to exert their fierce and savage strength for a good purpose, and fling it off at once
Can we, then, by the citation of some of those instances wherein this thing of whiteness --though for the time either wholly or in great part stripped of all direct associations calculated to impart to it aught fearful, but, nevertheless, is found to exert over us the same sorcery, however modified; --can we thus hope to light upon some chance clue to conduct us to the hidden cause we seek?
I was obliged to exert the utmost care and caution, for in many places the road was not two yards wide, and often the lower side of it sloped away in slanting precipices eight and even nine feet deep.
I have not said, exert yourself Harriet for my sake; think less, talk less of Mr.
Elinor, too, was deeply afflicted; but still she could struggle, she could exert herself.
I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will, which I now exert to leave you.
I am too confused to exert it at a moment's notice.
She said she had tried to exert herself, and so, I have no doubt, she had.
The Preceptory was but a day's journey from the demolished castle of Torquilstone, and the Jew had hoped to reach it before nightfall; accordingly, having dismissed his guides at the verge of the forest, and rewarded them with a piece of silver, he began to press on with such speed as his weariness permitted him to exert.
He folded his arms on the rail and gravely addressed the dead figure, which still affected him so strongly that he had to exert his will to face it with composure.