exigency

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ex·i·gen·cy

 (ĕk′sə-jən-sē, ĭg-zĭj′ən-)
n. pl. ex·i·gen·cies
1. A pressing or urgent situation: "We were caught in a wartime exigency that was beyond any humane, any rational, resistance" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
2. An urgent requirement; a pressing need: "distracted by the exigencies of running a business" (Richard Curtis).

exigency

(ˈɛksɪdʒənsɪ; ɪɡˈzɪdʒənsɪ) or

exigence

n, pl -gencies or -gences
1. the state of being exigent; urgency
2. (often plural) an urgent demand; pressing requirement
3. an emergency

ex•i•gen•cy

(ˈɛk sɪ dʒən si, ɪgˈzɪdʒ ən-)

n., pl. -cies.
1. exigent state or character; urgency.
2. Usu., exigencies. the need, demand, or requirement intrinsic to a circumstance, condition, etc: the exigencies of city life.
3. a case or situation which demands prompt action or remedy; emergency or plight.
Often, ex′i•gence.
[1575–85; < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exigency - a pressing or urgent situation; "the health-care exigency"
crisis - an unstable situation of extreme danger or difficulty; "they went bankrupt during the economic crisis"
2.exigency - a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate actionexigency - a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate action; "he never knew what to do in an emergency"
crisis - a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something; "after the crisis the patient either dies or gets better"

exigency

exigence
noun
1. need, demand, requirement, necessity, constraint, wont The reduction was caused by the exigencies of a wartime economy.

exigency

noun
1. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance:
2. A condition in which something necessary or desirable is required or wanted:
3. A decisive point:
4. Something asked for or needed.Often used in plural:
Translations

exigency

[ɪgˈzɪdʒənsɪ] N (= need) → exigencia f; (= emergency) → caso m de urgencia

exigency

[ˈɛksɪdʒənsi] nexigence f
the exigencies of sth → les exigences de qch

exigency

[ˈɛksɪdʒənsɪ] n (frm) → esigenza
References in classic literature ?
The act from Annapolis recommends the "appointment of commissioners to take into consideration the situation of the United States; to devise SUCH FURTHER PROVISIONS as shall appear to them necessary to render the Constitution of the federal government ADEQUATE TO THE EXIGENCIES OF THE UNION; and to report such an act for that purpose, to the United States in Congress assembled, as when agreed to by them, and afterwards confirmed by the legislature of every State, will effectually provide for the same.
Resolved, That in the opinion of Congress it is expedient, that on the second Monday of May next a convention of delegates, who shall have been appointed by the several States, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose OF REVISING THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION, and reporting to Congress and the several legislatures such ALTERATIONS AND PROVISIONS THEREIN, as shall, when agreed to in Congress, and confirmed by the States, render the federal Constitution ADEQUATE TO THE EXIGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT AND THE PRESERVATION OF THE UNION.
From these two acts, it appears, 1st, that the object of the convention was to establish, in these States, A FIRM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; 2d, that this government was to be such as would be ADEQUATE TO THE EXIGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT and THE PRESERVATION OF THE UNION; 3d, that these purposes were to be effected by ALTERATIONS AND PROVISIONS IN THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION, as it is expressed in the act of Congress, or by SUCH FURTHER PROVISIONS AS SHOULD APPEAR NECESSARY, as it stands in the recommendatory act from Annapolis; 4th, that the alterations and provisions were to be reported to Congress, and to the States, in order to be agreed to by the former and confirmed by the latter.
They were to frame a NATIONAL GOVERNMENT, adequate to the EXIGENCIES OF GOVERNMENT, and OF THE UNION; and to reduce the articles of Confederation into such form as to accomplish these purposes.
It might even have occurred to them, that where a disposition to cavil prevailed, their neglect to execute the degree of power vested in them, and still more their recommendation of any measure whatever, not warranted by their commission, would not less excite animadversion, than a recommendation at once of a measure fully commensurate to the national exigencies.
While we smile at the simplicity of his heart and the narrowness of his views, which made him regard everything out of the direct path of his daily duty, and the rigid exigencies of the service, as trivial and impertinent, which inspired him with contempt for the swelling vanity of some of his coadjutors, and the literary exercises and curious researches of others, we cannot but applaud that strict and conscientious devotion to the interests of his employer, and to what he considered the true objects of the enterprise in which he was engaged.
He has also been very desirous to establish such rules as will conduce to perfect the internal policy of his state, and he ought also to have done the same with respect to its neighbours and all foreign nations; for the considerations of the military establishment should take place in planning every government, that it may not be unprovided in case of a war, of which he has said nothing; so also with respect to property, it ought not only to be adapted to the exigencies of the state, but also to such dangers as may arise from without.
A citizen of Philadelphia, William Stangerson had been obliged to become naturalised in obedience to family exigencies at the time of his marriage with a French lady, she who was to be the mother of the illustrious Stangerson.
The women and children of a man's retinue may be likened to a military unit for which he is responsible in various ways, as in matters of instruction, discipline, sustenance, and the exigencies of their continual roamings and their unending strife with other communities and with the red Martians.
Young dogs are bound to play, and out of the exigencies of the situation they realised their play in this mimic warfare.
If even the rule adopted should in practice justify the equality of its principle, still delinquencies in payments on the part of some of the States would result from a diversity of other causes -- the real deficiency of resources; the mismanagement of their finances; accidental disorders in the management of the government; and, in addition to the rest, the reluctance with which men commonly part with money for purposes that have outlived the exigencies which produced them, and interfere with the supply of immediate wants.
The Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) has reassigned 15 of its personnel in a bid to address the exigencies of the revenue service.