exigent

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ex·i·gent

 (ĕk′sə-jənt)
adj.
1. Requiring immediate action; pressing: an exigent need. See Synonyms at urgent.
2. Having or making urgent demands; demanding: "Some citizens ... seized the offending material and made a bonfire of it ... to the gratification of an exigent crowd" (Garry Wills).

[Latin exigēns, exigent-, present participle of exigere, to demand; see exact.]

ex′i·gent·ly adv.

exigent

(ˈɛksɪdʒənt)
adj
1. urgent; pressing
2. exacting; demanding
[C15: from Latin exigere to drive out, weigh out, from agere to drive, compel]
ˈexigently adv

ex•i•gent

(ˈɛk sɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. requiring immediate action or aid; urgent; pressing.
2. requiring a great deal, or more than is reasonable.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin exigent-, s. of exigēns, present participle of exigere to drive out, demand; see exact]
ex′i•gent•ly, adv.

exigent

- A good word to write on letters or packages, since everyone else writes "urgent" or "rush."
See also related terms for rush.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exigent - demanding attention; "clamant needs"; "a crying need"; "regarded literary questions as exigent and momentous"- H.L.Mencken; "insistent hunger"; "an instant need"
imperative - requiring attention or action; "as nuclear weapons proliferate, preventing war becomes imperative"; "requests that grew more and more imperative"
2.exigent - requiring precise accuracy; "an exacting job"; "became more exigent over his pronunciation"
demanding - requiring more than usually expected or thought due; especially great patience and effort and skill; "found the job very demanding"; "a baby can be so demanding"

exigent

adjective
1. Compelling immediate attention:
2. Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength:
Translations
égetőigényeskövetelőkövetelődzősürgős

exigent

[ˈeksɪdʒənt] ADJexigente; (= urgent) → urgente

exigent

adj (= urgent)zwingend, dringend; (= exacting) masterstreng, gestreng (old)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the empirical death of the author may converge with Blanchot's sense of authorial effacement to render yet a fourth sense: the writing of disaster as the poet's relation to his own death that impends exigently upon the "now" (Michael Holland argues that death in Blanchot's notion of writing concerns a unique presence or timelessness "haunted by a surplus of life" [50]).