exiled


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ex·ile

 (ĕg′zīl′, ĕk′sīl′)
n.
1.
a. The condition or period of being forced to live away from one's native country or home, especially as a punishment.
b. The condition or period of self-imposed absence from one's country or home: a writer living in exile in protest.
2. One who lives away from one's native country, whether because of expulsion or voluntary absence.
tr.v. ex·iled, ex·il·ing, ex·iles
To send into exile; banish: The royal family was exiled after the uprising.

[Middle English exil, from Old French, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul, exiled person, wanderer.]

ex·il′ic (ĭg-zĭl′ĭk, ĭk-sĭl′-), ex·il′ian (ĭg-zĭl′yən, -zĭl′ē-ən, ĭk-sĭl′yən, -sĭl′ē-ən) adj.

exiled

(ˈɛksaɪld)
adj
(of a person) living in a foreign country because they cannot live in their own country, usually for political reasons
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

exiled

adjective banished, deported, expatriate, outcast, refugee, ostracized, expat The exiled spiritual leader of Tibet, the Dalai Lama
Translations

exiled

[ˈeksaɪld] ADJexiliado
References in classic literature ?
As Abraham before the angels, I bowed myself; the white thing was so white, its wings so wide, and in those for ever exiled waters, I had lost the miserable warping memories of traditions and of towns.
Yes, gentlemen, you see before you, in blue jeans and misery, the wanderin', exiled, tram- pled-on, and sufferin' rightful King of France.
Rochester entered, unannounced, and looking at us, seemed to take pleasure in the spectacle of a group so amicable--when he said he supposed the old lady was all right now that she had got her adopted daughter back again, and added that he saw Adele was "prete e croquer sa petite maman Anglaise"--I half ventured to hope that he would, even after his marriage, keep us together somewhere under the shelter of his protection, and not quite exiled from the sunshine of his presence.
Maybe I understood because I saw her in that early hour of the morning when even the stony Memnon sings, in that mystical light of the young day when divine exiled things, condemned to rough bondage through the noon, are for a short magical hour their own celestial selves, their unearthly glory as yet unhidden by any earthly disguise.
Madame de Vernet was driven from me, Putange was exiled, Madame de Chevreuse fell into disgrace, and when you wished to come back as ambassador to France, the king himself--remember, my lord--the king himself opposed to it.
True," replied the marquise, without wincing in the slightest degree at the tragic remembrance thus called up; "but bear in mind, if you please, that our respective parents underwent persecution and proscription from diametrically opposite principles; in proof of which I may remark, that while my family remained among the stanchest adherents of the exiled princes, your father lost no time in joining the new government; and that while the Citizen Noirtier was a Girondin, the Count Noirtier became a senator.
As Bud passed through the gates, she no longer wondered that the exiled Fairies wept and sorrowed for the lovely home they had lost.
Let him be conquered, exiled, proscribed, provided he still lives.
But on the other side, on the flat Essex side, a shapeless and desolate red edifice, a vast pile of bricks with many windows and a slate roof more inaccessible than an Alpine slope, towers over the bend in monstrous ugliness, the tallest, heaviest building for miles around, a thing like an hotel, like a mansion of flats (all to let), exiled into these fields out of a street in West Kensington.
Many of these bear with them the smart of real or fancied injuries; many consider themselves expatriated beings, wrongfully exiled from their hereditary homes, and the sepulchres of their fathers, and cherish a deep and abiding animosity against the race that has dispossessed them.
But you are fitted for society, and it is shameful to have you exiled from it.
Indeed, the new Power which had arisen in Siberia, backed by Japan and other powerful allies, was inclined to take the matter up in the interests of its exiled subjects; and there had been wild talk about ambassadors and ultimatums.