existential


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ex·is·ten·tial

 (ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shəl, ĕk′sĭ-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence.
2. Based on experience; empirical.
3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice.
4. Linguistics Of or relating to a construction or part of a construction that indicates existence, as the words there is in the sentence There is a cat on the mat.
n. Linguistics
An existential word or construction.

ex′is·ten′tial·ly adv.

existential

(ˌɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəl)
adj
1. of or relating to existence, esp human existence
2. (Philosophy) philosophy pertaining to what exists, and is thus known by experience rather than reason; empirical as opposed to theoretical
3. (Logic) logic denoting or relating to a formula or proposition asserting the existence of at least one object fulfilling a given condition; containing an existential quantifier
4. (Philosophy) of or relating to existentialism
n
(Logic)
a. an existential statement or formula
ˌexisˈtentially adv

ex•is•ten•tial

(ˌɛg zɪˈstɛn ʃəl, ˌɛk sɪ-)

adj.
1. pertaining to existence.
2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of existentialism.
[1685–95; < Late Latin]
ex`is•ten′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.existential - derived from experience or the experience of existence; "the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers"- Benjamin Farrington; "formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters"- John Dewey
empirical, empiric - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
2.existential - of or as conceived by existentialism; "an existential moment of choice"
3.existential - relating to or dealing with existence (especially with human existence)
Translations

existential

[ˌegzɪsˈtenʃəl] ADJexistencial

existential

[ˌɛgzɪˈstɛnʃəl] adj
[question] → existentiel(le)
[fear, anxiety] → existentiel(le)

existential

existential

[ˌɛgzɪsˈtɛnʃl] adj (frm) → esistenziale
References in periodicals archive ?
This is an existential threat potentially to the United States but also to North Korea," Coats said "Kim Jong Un views any kind of kinetic attack or effort to force him to give up his nuclear weapons, is an existential threat to his nation and to his leadership in particular.
1) To the best of my knowledge, something like this view is today widely endorsed, at least if Dewey's statement is understood to mean the following dictum: "all existential statements can be denied without self-contradiction" (that is, contradiction internal to the statement's semantics).
Basically, Michael just smoked a big bowl of ennui, and now he's having an existential crisis.
Following each parable, the contributing existential psychologist shares a personal and scholarly reflection on the meaning and relevance of the parable for psychotherapy and contemporary life.
Their topics include existential hermeneutics: Kierkegaard and Gadamer on practical knowledge (phronesis, how to be a human in the world: Kierkegaard's question of existence, disclosing despair: the role of pseudonyms in Kierkegaard's existential approach, anxiety as the origin of freedom and responsibility, and the dangers of losing oneself: Habermas' species ethics in light of Kierkegaard's existential analysis.
I would say that the Congress is facing an existential crisis.
Welcome to Volume Two of the twenty-eighth edition of Existential Analysis.
The advent of a "no deal" with Britain in its Brexit talks is "likely to exacerbate the EU's existential challenges, rather than reduce them", a Centre for Policy Studies paper said.
Former Mossad Director Tamir Pardo said he believes only one thing poses an existential threat to Israel -- a binational state.
The results of a phenomenological study exploring the existential experiences of counselors-in-training are presented.
Secretary of State John Kerry does not agree with Marine General Joseph Dunford that Russia poses an existential threat to the United States, U.
Stewart (a professor at the University of Newcastle) claim that "terrorism poses no existential threat to America" and that "we must stop pretending otherwise.