existential


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Related to existential: Existential Psychology, Existential therapy

ex·is·ten·tial

 (ĕg′zĭ-stĕn′shəl, ĕk′sĭ-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence.
2. Based on experience; empirical.
3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice.
4. Linguistics Of or relating to a construction or part of a construction that indicates existence, as the words there is in the sentence There is a cat on the mat.
n. Linguistics
An existential word or construction.

ex′is·ten′tial·ly adv.

existential

(ˌɛɡzɪˈstɛnʃəl)
adj
1. of or relating to existence, esp human existence
2. (Philosophy) philosophy pertaining to what exists, and is thus known by experience rather than reason; empirical as opposed to theoretical
3. (Logic) logic denoting or relating to a formula or proposition asserting the existence of at least one object fulfilling a given condition; containing an existential quantifier
4. (Philosophy) of or relating to existentialism
n
(Logic)
a. an existential statement or formula
ˌexisˈtentially adv

ex•is•ten•tial

(ˌɛg zɪˈstɛn ʃəl, ˌɛk sɪ-)

adj.
1. pertaining to existence.
2. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of existentialism.
[1685–95; < Late Latin]
ex`is•ten′tial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.existential - derived from experience or the experience of existence; "the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers"- Benjamin Farrington; "formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters"- John Dewey
empirical, empiric - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
2.existential - of or as conceived by existentialism; "an existential moment of choice"
3.existential - relating to or dealing with existence (especially with human existence)
Translations

existential

[ˌegzɪsˈtenʃəl] ADJexistencial

existential

[ˌɛgzɪˈstɛnʃəl] adj
[question] → existentiel(le)
[fear, anxiety] → existentiel(le)

existential

existential

[ˌɛgzɪsˈtɛnʃl] adj (frm) → esistenziale
References in periodicals archive ?
Most commentaries on data like those in (1) assume that the 'have' construction in (1b) and the existential construction in (1c) in reality contain the preposition da 'with', as illustrated in (1a).
Readers are then shown how the existential self is understood as a tension rather than a substance and relational rather than isolated (chapter four, "Self and Others").
NNA - Hezbollah Secretary General, Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah, regretted on Tuesday that the Islamic world was facing an unprecedented existential crisis in the history of the region, confirming that ongoing developments have nothing to do with Islam and their past.
Secretary of State John Kerry does not agree with Marine General Joseph Dunford that Russia poses an existential threat to the United States, U.
Rittenhouse argues that consumerism is an existential meaning strategy, and therefore has been misunderstood by every major attempt to confront it.
Green for his witty yet rueful dialogue and his incisive, seemingly effortless allusions to Kierkegaard, Shakespeare, Abraham Maslow, and the profound existential dilemmas confronted by the story's protagonists, two adolescents with cancer.
Synopsis: "We the Cosmopolitans: Moral and Existential Conditions of Being Human" is compendium of six theoretically experimental essays, where contributors try different ideas to answer distinct concerns regarding cosmopolitanism.
The five-piece alternative/ experimental/indie/emo band spent months creating Existential Ambiguity, or Something and recorded it in December.
Taking as its central premise that migrant experiences shed light on the human condition through the "embodied, cognitive and existential experience of living `in between' or on the `borderlands' between differently figured life-worlds," as editor Gronseth (social anthropology, U.
Besides relieving physical pain, acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, may reduce existential pain.
Psychological scientist and lead researcher Sander Koole of VU University Amsterdam said that even fleeting and seemingly trivial instances of interpersonal touch may help people to deal more effectively with existential concern.
Tylenol might be able to clear up your existential angst along with your fever, new research says.