existentialist philosophy


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Noun1.existentialist philosophy - (philosophy) a 20th-century philosophical movement chiefly in Europe; assumes that people are entirely free and thus responsible for what they make of themselves
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
depersonalisation, depersonalization - (existentialism) a loss of personal identity; a feeling of being an anonymous cog in an impersonal social machine
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, contemporary existentialist philosophy and clinical psychology have led to the development of a model of personal wholeness that focuses on self-knowledge through therapy and introspection as the key to mental health and wellness.
This self-help work pulls no punches in its examination of the uncompromising existentialist philosophy of the human condition and how it applies to life, death, sex, being, nothingness, god, love, hate, freedom, sex, and anxiety, but is written with good humor.
There he read the works of Soren Kierkegaard, whose existentialist philosophy played an important role in his decisions to become a novelist instead of a physician and to convert to Roman Catholicism.
Although close friend Simone de Beauvoir thought that Sartre wastes his writer's talent in philosophical discourse, his L'Etre et le Neant (Being and Nothingness 1943) is regarded as one of the corner stones of existentialist philosophy in general and ethics in particular.
Liberal values and existentialist philosophy as expounded by Immanuel Kant, Soren Kirkegord, Jean Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, etc found its expression in Malayalam through the genius of KP Appan.
Crawford asserts that in works such as the later Fafhrd and Gray Mouser tales ("Trapped in the Shadowland," "The Bleak Shore") and in the novel Our Lady of Darkness, the existentialist philosophy of Jean Paul Sartre is employed by Leiber as a way of artistically confronting death and a consequent rebirth.
Of special interest to literati is material that has never before been published: scenes from "The Emporium", an ambitious yet unfinished play that evolved out of Wilder's involvement with existentialist philosophy in his postwar years, as well as the complete screenplay that Wilder wrote for Alfred Hitchcock's movie "Shadow of a Doubt" just prior to reporting for military service in 1942.
As a companion to Counseling children: a practical introduction, this text walks through the process of counseling adolescents using the proactive approach based on existentialist philosophy and constructivist thinking.
However, I do listen to music when driving and read French existentialist philosophy when stationary.