exoteric

(redirected from exoterically)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

ex·o·ter·ic

 (ĕk′sə-tĕr′ĭk)
adj.
1. Not confined to an inner circle of disciples or initiates.
2. Comprehensible to or suited to the public; popular.
3. Of or relating to the outside; external.

[Latin exōtericus, external, from Greek exōterikos, from exōterō, comparative of exō, outside; see exo-.]

ex′o·ter′i·cal·ly adv.

exoteric

(ˌɛksəʊˈtɛrɪk) or

exoterical

adj
1. intelligible to or intended for more than a select or initiated minority: an exoteric account of a philosophical doctrine.
2. external; exterior
[C17: from Latin exōtericus external, from Greek exōterikos, from exōterō further outside; see exo-]
ˌexoˈterically adv
ˌexoˈteriˌcism n

ex•o•ter•ic

(ˌɛk səˈtɛr ɪk)

adj.
1. suitable for communication to the general public.
2. not limited to the inner or select circle, as of disciples.
3. pertaining to the outside; external.
[1645–55; < Late Latin exōtericus external < Greek exōterikós=exṓter(ō) further out (comp. of éxō; see exo-) + -ikos -ic]
ex`o•ter′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exoteric - suitable for the general public; "writings of an exoteric nature"
public - not private; open to or concerning the people as a whole; "the public good"; "public libraries"; "public funds"; "public parks"; "a public scandal"; "public gardens"; "performers and members of royal families are public figures"
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Exoterically speaking, atomic bombs will be detonated underground to fracture "tight" gas-bearing rock formations.
The exoterically conceived return movement from peace to chaos and back to peace again is not a movement to something, however, but a movement precisely to nothing--a neutrality and amniotic suspension of reality to which we crave to return but which was never really there in the first place.
According to Altman, Strauss's criticism of Heidegger's and Schmitt's decisionism may exoterically fly the flag of ancient prudence, moderation, and the Platonic concern for truth and virtue, but in fact it hides a esoteric Nietzschean will to power that surpasses that of his two contemporaries.