exotic


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Related to exotic: Exotic species

ex·ot·ic

 (ĭg-zŏt′ĭk)
adj.
1. From another part of the world; foreign: exotic tropical plants in a greenhouse. See Synonyms at foreign.
2. Intriguingly unusual or different; excitingly strange: "If something can be explained simply, in a familiar way, then it is best to avoid more exotic explanations" (Chet Raymo). See Synonyms at fantastic.
3. Of or involving striptease: an exotic dancer.
n.
1. One that is exotic.
2. A striptease performer.

[Latin exōticus, from Greek exōtikos, from exō, outside; see exo-.]

ex·ot′i·cal·ly adv.
ex·ot′ic·ness n.

exotic

(ɪɡˈzɒtɪk)
adj
1. originating in a foreign country, esp one in the tropics; not native: an exotic plant.
2. having a strange or bizarre allure, beauty, or quality
3. NZ (of trees, esp pine trees) native to the northern hemisphere but cultivated in New Zealand: an exotic forest.
4. of or relating to striptease
n
an exotic person or thing
[C16: from Latin exōticus, from Greek exōtikos foreign, from exō outside]
exˈotically adv
exˈotiˌcism n
exˈoticness n

ex•ot•ic

(ɪgˈzɒt ɪk)

adj.
1. not native; introduced from abroad; foreign: exotic foods.
2. strikingly unusual or strange in effect, appearance, or nature: exotic weapons.
n.
3. something exotic, as a bird or plant.
[1590–1600; < Latin exōticus < Greek exōtikós foreign]
ex•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.
ex•ot′ic•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.exotic - being or from or characteristic of another place or part of the worldexotic - being or from or characteristic of another place or part of the world; "alien customs"; "exotic plants in a greenhouse"; "exotic cuisine"
foreign, strange - relating to or originating in or characteristic of another place or part of the world; "foreign nations"; "a foreign accent"; "on business in a foreign city"
2.exotic - strikingly strange or unusual; "an exotic hair style"; "protons, neutrons, electrons and all their exotic variants"; "the exotic landscape of a dead planet"
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"

exotic

exotic

adjective
Of, from, or characteristic of another place or part of the world:
Archaic: outlandish.
Translations
أجْنَبيأَجْنَبِيّغَريب
exotickýcizokrajný
eksotiskfremmedartetusædvanlig
eksoottinen
egzotičan
egzotikus
framandi, frá fjarlægu landiframandi; heillandi
エキゾチックエキゾチックな
이국적인이국풍의외국산의외래의
egzotiškas
eksotisksekstravagants
exotický
exotisk
มาจากประเทศอื่น
lạ

exotic

[ɪgˈzɒtɪk]
A. ADJ [flower, bird, fruit, food, place] → exótico; [holiday] → en un lugar exótico
B. N (Bot) → planta f exótica

exotic

[ɪgˈzɒtɪk] adjexotique

exotic

adjexotisch; exotic dancerexotischer Tänzer, exotische Tänzerin; exotic holidays (esp Brit) or vacation (US) → Urlaub min exotischen Ländern
n (Bot) → exotische Pflanze, Exot(e) m

exotic

[ɪgˈzɒtɪk] adjesotico/a

exotic

(igˈzotik) adjective
1. unusual or colourful. exotic clothes.
2. brought or introduced from a foreign country. exotic plants.

exotic

أَجْنَبِيّ exotický eksotisk exotisch εξωτικός exótico eksoottinen exotique egzotičan esotico エキゾチックな 이국적인 exotisch eksotisk egzotyczny exótico экзотический exotisk มาจากประเทศอื่น egzotik lạ 异国情调的

exotic

a. exótico-a, raro-a, extraño-a, extranjeros.
References in classic literature ?
At an open window of a room in the second story, hanging over some pots of beautiful and delicate flowers,--exotics, but which had never known a more genial sunshine than that of the New England autumn, --was the figure of a young lady, an exotic, like the flowers, and beautiful and delicate as they.
For like certain other omnivorous roving lovers that might be named, my Lord Whale has no taste for the nursery, however much for the bower; and so, being a great traveller, he leaves his anonymous babies all over the world; every baby an exotic.
The negro, it must be remembered, is an exotic of the most gorgeous and superb countries of the world, and he has, deep in his heart, a passion for all that is splendid, rich, and fanciful; a passion which, rudely indulged by an untrained taste, draws on them the ridicule of the colder and more correct white race.
And that pretty girl-widow, I should like to know her history: whether she be a native of the country, or, as is more probable, an exotic that the surly INDIGENAE will not recognise for kin.
Looking back at the old town, with its one steep street climbing the white face of the chalk hill, I remembered what wonderful exotic women Thomas Hardy had found eating their hearts out behind the windows of dull country high streets, through which hung waving no banners of romance, outwardly as unpromising of adventure as the windows of the town I had left.
His little dinners, in the settling of which Lord Henry always assisted him, were noted as much for the careful selection and placing of those invited, as for the exquisite taste shown in the decoration of the table, with its subtle symphonic arrangements of exotic flowers, and embroidered cloths, and antique plate of gold and silver.
The tiny back yard on her side had a few stone-bordered little beds of black earth, in which the simple flowers she found time to cultivate appeared somehow extravagantly overgrown, as if belonging to an exotic clime; and Captain Hagberd's upright, hale person, clad in No.
It is interesting to shift one's point of view--to enter into strange, exotic ways of looking at life.
There is something tropical and exotic about her which forms a singular contrast to her cool and unemotional brother.
The semicircle of lawn in front of the house was varied by three circular garden beds, one of red tulips, a second of yellow tulips, and the third of some white, waxen-looking blossoms that the visitors did not know and presumed to be exotic.
Yet the exotic had grown here, suddenly as the prophet's gourd; and had drawn hither Tess.
But you couldn't make a man like Winsett see that; and that was why the New York of literary clubs and exotic restaurants, though a first shake made it seem more of a kaleidoscope, turned out, in the end, to be a smaller box, with a more monotonous pattern, than the assembled atoms of Fifth Avenue.