expel


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ex·pel

 (ĭk-spĕl′)
tr.v. ex·pelled, ex·pel·ling, ex·pels
1. To force or drive out: expel an invader.
2. To discharge from or as if from a receptacle: expelled a sigh of relief.
3. To deprive of membership or rights in an organization; force to leave: expelled the student from college for cheating.

[Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere : ex-, ex- + pellere, to drive; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

ex·pel′la·ble adj.
ex·pel′ler n.

expel

(ɪkˈspɛl)
vb (tr) , -pels, -pelling or -pelled
1. to eject or drive out with force
2. (Education) to deprive of participation in or membership of a school, club, etc
[C14: from Latin expellere to drive out, from pellere to thrust, drive]
exˈpellable adj
expellee n
exˈpeller n

ex•pel

(ɪkˈspɛl)

v.t. -pelled, -pel•ling.
1. to drive or force out or away; discharge; eject.
2. to cut off from membership or relations: to expel a student from a college.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin expellere to drive out, drive away]
ex•pel′la•ble, adj.
ex•pel′ler, n.

expel


Past participle: expelled
Gerund: expelling

Imperative
expel
expel
Present
I expel
you expel
he/she/it expels
we expel
you expel
they expel
Preterite
I expelled
you expelled
he/she/it expelled
we expelled
you expelled
they expelled
Present Continuous
I am expelling
you are expelling
he/she/it is expelling
we are expelling
you are expelling
they are expelling
Present Perfect
I have expelled
you have expelled
he/she/it has expelled
we have expelled
you have expelled
they have expelled
Past Continuous
I was expelling
you were expelling
he/she/it was expelling
we were expelling
you were expelling
they were expelling
Past Perfect
I had expelled
you had expelled
he/she/it had expelled
we had expelled
you had expelled
they had expelled
Future
I will expel
you will expel
he/she/it will expel
we will expel
you will expel
they will expel
Future Perfect
I will have expelled
you will have expelled
he/she/it will have expelled
we will have expelled
you will have expelled
they will have expelled
Future Continuous
I will be expelling
you will be expelling
he/she/it will be expelling
we will be expelling
you will be expelling
they will be expelling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been expelling
you have been expelling
he/she/it has been expelling
we have been expelling
you have been expelling
they have been expelling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been expelling
you will have been expelling
he/she/it will have been expelling
we will have been expelling
you will have been expelling
they will have been expelling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been expelling
you had been expelling
he/she/it had been expelling
we had been expelling
you had been expelling
they had been expelling
Conditional
I would expel
you would expel
he/she/it would expel
we would expel
you would expel
they would expel
Past Conditional
I would have expelled
you would have expelled
he/she/it would have expelled
we would have expelled
you would have expelled
they would have expelled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.expel - force to leave or move out; "He was expelled from his native country"
eject, turf out, boot out, chuck out, exclude, turn out - put out or expel from a place; "The unruly student was excluded from the game"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
exile, expatriate, deport - expel from a country; "The poet was exiled because he signed a letter protesting the government's actions"
debar, suspend - bar temporarily; from school, office, etc.
extradite, deport, deliver - hand over to the authorities of another country; "They extradited the fugitive to his native country so he could be tried there"
banish, bar, relegate - expel, as if by official decree; "he was banished from his own country"
banish, blackball, cast out, ostracise, ostracize, shun, ban - expel from a community or group
banish, ban - ban from a place of residence, as for punishment
2.expel - remove from a position or office; "The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds"
excommunicate - oust or exclude from a group or membership by decree
remove - remove from a position or an office
depose, force out - force to leave (an office)
3.expel - cause to flee; "rout out the fighters from their caves"
defeat, get the better of, overcome - win a victory over; "You must overcome all difficulties"; "defeat your enemies"; "He overcame his shyness"; "He overcame his infirmity"; "Her anger got the better of her and she blew up"
4.expel - eliminate (a substance); "combustion products are exhausted in the engine"; "the plant releases a gas"
cough out, cough up, expectorate, spit up, spit out - discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
blow - free of obstruction by blowing air through; "blow one's nose"
ejaculate - eject semen
abort - terminate a pregnancy by undergoing an abortion
ovulate - produce and discharge eggs; "women ovulate about once every month"
egest, excrete, eliminate, pass - eliminate from the body; "Pass a kidney stone"
bleed, hemorrhage, shed blood - lose blood from one's body
eruct, spew out, spew - eject or send out in large quantities, also metaphorical; "the volcano spews out molten rocks every day"; "The editors of the paper spew out hostile articles about the Presidential candidate"
fester, suppurate, maturate - ripen and generate pus; "her wounds are festering"
emit, pass off, breathe - expel (gases or odors)

expel

verb
1. throw out, exclude, ban, bar, dismiss, discharge, relegate, kick out (informal), ask to leave, send packing, turf out (informal), black, debar, drum out, blackball, give the bum's rush (slang), show you the door, throw out on your ear (informal) secondary school students expelled for cheating in exams
throw out admit, let in, give access, allow to enter
2. banish, exile, oust, deport, expatriate, evict, force to leave, proscribe An American academic was expelled from the country yesterday.
banish receive, welcome, take in
3. drive out, discharge, throw out, force out, let out, eject, issue, dislodge, spew, belch, cast out Poisonous gas is expelled into the atmosphere.

expel

verb
1. To force to leave a country or place by official decree:
2. To send forth (confined matter) violently:
Geology: extravasate.
3. To put out by force:
Informal: chuck.
Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.
Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear.
Translations
يَتَخَلَّص منيَطْرُدُيَطْرُد، يُبْعِد
vyloučit
bortviseblive af med
karkottaa
izbaciti
kicsap
knÿja út, òrÿsta útreka, vísa á brott
追い出す
쫓아내다
izraidītizslēgtizspiest
izgnatiizključiti
relegera
ไล่ออก
kovmakkurtulmak
đuổi

expel

[ɪksˈpel] VT [+ air] (from container) → arrojar, expeler; [+ person] → expulsar
to get expelled (from school) → ser expulsado

expel

[ɪkˈspɛl] vt
(= force to leave) [+ inhabitant] → chasser, expulser
to be expelled from sth [+ area, village] → être expulsé(e) de, être chassé(e) de; [+ building] → être expulsé(e) de
[+ pupil] → renvoyer, exclure
to get expelled from → se faire renvoyer de
[+ air, gas] → évacuer, expulser
to expel sth from sth → évacuer qch de qch, expulser qch de qch

expel

vt
personvertreiben; (officially, from country) → ausweisen, ausschaffen (Sw) → (from aus); (from school) → verweisen (→ from von, +gen); (from society) → ausstoßen, ausschließen; evilaustreiben
gas, liquidausstoßen; to expel one’s breathausatmen

expel

[ɪksˈpɛl] vtespellere

expel

(ikˈspel) past tense, past participle exˈpelled verb
1. to send away in disgrace (a person from a school etc). The child was expelled for stealing.
2. to get rid of. an electric fan for expelling kitchen smells.
expulsion (ikˈspalʃən) noun
Any child found disobeying this rule will face expulsion from the school.

expel

يَطْرُدُ vyloučit bortvise vertreiben αποβάλλω expulsar karkottaa expulser izbaciti espellere 追い出す 쫓아내다 wegzenden kaste ut wydalić expelir исключать relegera ไล่ออก kovmak đuổi 开除

expel

vt. expulsar.
References in classic literature ?
He tried to reason himself out of fears, which the different judgment of the apothecary seemed to render absurd; but the many hours of each day in which he was left entirely alone, were but too favourable for the admission of every melancholy idea, and he could not expel from his mind the persuasion that he should see Marianne no more.
Brocklehurst would expel you from the school; that would be a great grief to your relations.
Or could we break our way By force, and at our heels all Hell should rise With blackest Insurrection, to confound Heav'ns purest Light, yet our great Enemie All incorruptible would on his Throne Sit unpolluted, and th' Ethereal mould Incapable of stain would soon expel Her mischief, and purge off the baser fire Victorious.
If thou refusest my fair proffer,'' said the Prince, ``the Provost of the lists shall cut thy bowstring, break thy bow and arrows, and expel thee from the presence as a faint-hearted craven.
He saw that there was no mood of the mind that had not its counterpart in the sensuous life, and set himself to discover their true relations, wondering what there was in frankincense that made one mystical, and in ambergris that stirred one's passions, and in violets that woke the memory of dead romances, and in musk that troubled the brain, and in champak that stained the imagination; and seeking often to elaborate a real psychology of perfumes, and to estimate the several influences of sweet-smelling roots and scented, pollen-laden flowers; of aromatic balms and of dark and fragrant woods; of spikenard, that sickens; of hovenia, that makes men mad; and of aloes, that are said to be able to expel melancholy from the soul.
I perceived pretty clearly that I had not the stamina either to resist what the captain chose to do to expel me, or to force myself upon Montgomery and his companion.
Poyser, you perceive, was aware that nothing would be so likely to expel the comic as the terrible.
In another house, the entrance of a stranger might cause surprise-- perhaps anger, even going so far as to expel the said stranger with violence: but here, I knew, nothing of the sort could happen.
Young Edwards was hourly becoming more familiarized to his situation, and not infrequently mingled in the parties with an unconcern and gayety that for a short time would expel all unpleasant recollections from his mind.
Each house may determine the Rules of its Proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly Behavior, and, with the Concurrence of two-thirds, expel a Member.
I enter this cafe to lunch, and this man here would expel me.
He then was very careful to expel the last remnant of hydrogen through the valve, after which he heaped up a quantity of grass under the balloon, and set fire to it.