expense


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ex·pense

 (ĭk-spĕns′)
n.
1.
a. Something spent to attain a goal or accomplish a purpose: an expense of time and energy on the project.
b. A loss for the sake of something gained; a sacrifice: achieved speed at the expense of accuracy.
2. An expenditure of money; a cost: an improvement that was well worth the expense; a trip with all expenses paid.
3. expenses
a. Charges incurred by an employee in the performance of work: was reimbursed for her travel expenses.
b. Informal Money allotted for payment of such charges.
4. Something requiring the expenditure of money: Redecorating the house will be a considerable expense.
5. Archaic The act of expending.
tr.v. ex·pensed, ex·pens·ing, ex·pens·es
1. To charge with expenses.
2. To write off as an expense.
Idiom:
at (one's) expense
To one's detriment or chagrin: telling jokes at my expense.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin (pecūnia) expēnsa, (money) paid out, feminine past participle of expendere, to pay out; see expend.]

expense

(ɪkˈspɛns)
n
1. a particular payment of money; expenditure
2. (Commerce) money needed for individual purchases; cost; charge
3. (Accounting & Book-keeping) (plural) incidental money spent in the performance of a job, commission, etc, usually reimbursed by an employer or allowable against tax
4. something requiring money for its purchase or upkeep: the car was more of an expense than he had expected.
5. at the expense of to the detriment of: he succeeded at the expense of his health.
vb
(Accounting & Book-keeping) (tr) US and Canadian to treat as an expense for book-keeping or tax purposes
[C14: from Late Latin expēnsa, from Latin expēnsus weighed out; see expend]

ex•pense

(ɪkˈspɛns)

n., v. -pensed, -pens•ing. n.
1. cost; charge: the expense of a good meal.
2. a cause or occasion of spending: A car can be a great expense.
3. the act of expending; expenditure.
4. expenses,
a. charges incurred during a business assignment or trip.
b. money paid as reimbursement for such charges.
v.t.
5. to charge or write off as an expense.
Idioms:
at the expense of, at the sacrifice of; to the detriment of: quantity at the expense of quality.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin expēnsa, n. use of feminine of Latin expēnsus, past participle of expendere; see expend]
ex•pense′less, adj.

expense


Past participle: expensed
Gerund: expensing

Imperative
expense
expense
Present
I expense
you expense
he/she/it expenses
we expense
you expense
they expense
Preterite
I expensed
you expensed
he/she/it expensed
we expensed
you expensed
they expensed
Present Continuous
I am expensing
you are expensing
he/she/it is expensing
we are expensing
you are expensing
they are expensing
Present Perfect
I have expensed
you have expensed
he/she/it has expensed
we have expensed
you have expensed
they have expensed
Past Continuous
I was expensing
you were expensing
he/she/it was expensing
we were expensing
you were expensing
they were expensing
Past Perfect
I had expensed
you had expensed
he/she/it had expensed
we had expensed
you had expensed
they had expensed
Future
I will expense
you will expense
he/she/it will expense
we will expense
you will expense
they will expense
Future Perfect
I will have expensed
you will have expensed
he/she/it will have expensed
we will have expensed
you will have expensed
they will have expensed
Future Continuous
I will be expensing
you will be expensing
he/she/it will be expensing
we will be expensing
you will be expensing
they will be expensing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been expensing
you have been expensing
he/she/it has been expensing
we have been expensing
you have been expensing
they have been expensing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been expensing
you will have been expensing
he/she/it will have been expensing
we will have been expensing
you will have been expensing
they will have been expensing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been expensing
you had been expensing
he/she/it had been expensing
we had been expensing
you had been expensing
they had been expensing
Conditional
I would expense
you would expense
he/she/it would expense
we would expense
you would expense
they would expense
Past Conditional
I would have expensed
you would have expensed
he/she/it would have expensed
we would have expensed
you would have expensed
they would have expensed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expense - amounts paid for goods and services that may be currently tax deductible (as opposed to capital expenditures)expense - amounts paid for goods and services that may be currently tax deductible (as opposed to capital expenditures)
cost - the total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor
business expense, trade expense - ordinary and necessary expenses incurred in a taxpayer's business or trade
interest expense - interest paid on loans
lobbying expense - expenses incurred in promoting or evaluating legislation; "many lobbying expenses are deductible by a taxpayer"
medical expense - amount spent for diagnosis or treatment or prevention of medical problems
non-cash expense - an expense (such as depreciation) that is not paid for in cash
moving expense - the cost of moving your residence from one location to another
budget items, operating cost, operating expense, overhead - the expense of maintaining property (e.g., paying property taxes and utilities and insurance); it does not include depreciation or the cost of financing or income taxes
personal expense - the cost of personal or family living; "some personal expenses are tax deductible"
2.expense - a detriment or sacrifice; "at the expense of"
detriment, hurt - a damage or loss
3.expense - money spent to perform work and usually reimbursed by an employer; "he kept a careful record of his expenses at the meeting"
expenditure, outgo, outlay, spending - money paid out; an amount spent
incidental, incidental expense, minor expense - (frequently plural) an expense not budgeted or not specified; "he requested reimbursement of $7 for incidental expenses"
travel expense - (frequently plural) expenses incurred by an employee in the performance of the job and usually reimbursed by the employer
Verb1.expense - reduce the estimated value of something; "For tax purposes you can write off the laser printer"
depreciate - lower the value of something; "The Fed depreciated the dollar once again"

expense

noun
1. cost, charge, expenditure, payment, spending, output, toll, consumption, outlay, disbursement She has refurbished the whole place at vast expense.
plural noun
1. costs, expenditure, overheads, outgoings, disbursements, incidentals, incidental expenses All her expenses were paid by the company.
at the expense of with the sacrifice of, with the loss of, at the cost of, at the price of The company has increased productivity at the expense of safety.

expense

noun
1. Something expended to obtain a benefit or desired result:
2. A loss sustained in the accomplishment of or as the result of something:
Translations
سَبَب للمَصْروفمَصاريف، نَفَقَه
udgift
kulukustannus
költség
kostnaîur
na stroškestrošekstroški
masrafmasraf kaynağı

expense

[ɪksˈpens]
A. N (= cost) → gasto m, costo m expensesgastos mpl
travelling/repair expensesgastos mpl de viaje/reparación
with all expenses paidcon todos los gastos pagados
at great expensegastándose muchísimo dinero
at my expensea cuenta mía
they thought they would have a joke at my expensequerían reírse a costa mía
at the expense of (fig) → a costa de
you needn't go to the expense of buying a new oneno es preciso que te gastes dinero en comprar uno nuevo
they went to great expense to send her to a private schoolse metieron en muchos gastos para mandarla a un colegio privado
to meet the expense ofhacer frente a or correr con los gastos de
he apologized for putting us to so much expensese disculpó por habernos ocasionado tantos gastos
regardless of expensesin escatimar gastos
to be a great expense to sbsuponer a algn un gasto importante
see also business B
B. CPD expense account Ncuenta f de gastos de representación

expense

[ɪkˈspɛns]
n
(= cost) → dépense f, frais mpl
at great expense, at vast expense → à grands frais
at little expense → à peu de frais
to do sth at one's own expense → faire qch à ses frais
at sb's expense (financially)aux frais de qn
(= spending) → dépense f, frais mpl
to go to the expense of sth → faire la dépense de qch
to go to the expense of doing sth → faire la dépense de qch
(= detriment) at the expense of sb/sth → aux dépens de qn
to make a joke at sb's expense → bien rire aux dépens de qn expenses
npl
[employee] → frais mpl
to claim sth back on expenses → demander le remboursement de qch
[household] → dépenses fplexpense account nfrais mpl, note f de frais
to put sth on one's expense account → passer qch sur sa note de frais

expense

n
Kosten pl; at my expenseauf meine Kosten; at public expenseauf Staatskosten; at great expensemit hohen Kosten; it’s a big expensees ist eine große Ausgabe; to go to the expense of buying a car(viel) Geld für ein Auto anlegen; they went to the expense of installing a liftsie gaben viel Geld dafür aus, einen Lift einzubauen; to go to great expense to repair the housees sich (dat)etwas kosten lassen, das Haus instand or in Stand zu setzen
(Comm, usu pl) → Spesen pl; to incur expensesUnkosten haben; your expenses will be coveredIhre Unkosten werden Ihnen vergütet; put it on expensesschreiben Sie es auf die Spesenrechnung; it’s all on expensesdas geht alles auf Spesen
(fig) at somebody’s expense, at the expense of somebodyauf jds Kosten (acc); at the expense of somethingauf Kosten einer Sache (gen); to get rich at the expense of others/the poorsich auf Kosten anderer/der Armen bereichern; at the expense of qualityauf Kosten der Qualität

expense

:
expense account
nSpesenkonto nt; this will go on his expensedas geht auf Spesen
expense-account
adj attr expense lunchMittagessen ntauf Spesen; expense lifestyleLeben ntauf Spesen; it’s only expense people who stay in this hotel (inf)in diesem Hotel wohnen nur Spesenreiter (inf)
expenses form
nFormular ntzur Spesenabrechnung
expenses-paid
adjauf Geschäftskosten; an all-expense holidayein Gratisurlaub m

expense

[ɪksˈpɛns] n (cost) → spesa
at the expense of (fig) → a spese di
at the expense of his life → a prezzo della vita
at great expense → con grande impiego di mezzi
at my expense → a mie spese (fig) → alle mie spalle
to go to the expense (of) → sobbarcarsi la spesa (di)
regardless of expense → senza badare a spese
to put sb to the expense of → fare affrontare a qn la spesa di
to meet the expense of → affrontare la spesa di

expend

(ikˈspend) verb
to use or spend (supplies etc).
exˈpenditure (-tʃə) noun
the act of spending. the expenditure of money and resources; His expenditure(s) amounted to $500.
exˈpense (-s) noun
1. the spending of money etc; cost. I've gone to a lot of expense to educate you well.
2. a cause of spending. What an expense clothes are!
exˈpenses (-siz) noun plural
money spent in carrying out a job etc. His firm paid his travelling expenses.
exˈpensive (-siv) adjective
costing a great deal. expensive clothes.
at the expense of
1. being paid for by; at the cost of. He equipped the expedition at his own expense; At the expense of his health he finally completed the work.
2. making (a person) appear ridiculous. He told a joke at his wife's expense.

expense

n. gasto;
covered ___ -s___ -s cubiertos.
References in classic literature ?
I'll get myself up regardless of expense tomorrow and be a satisfaction to my friends.
I do not want to harness you to a needless expense that will pre- vent your making progress.
Their sites had been anticipated by more urgent buildings and mining works, unfortunately not considered in the sanguine dreams of the enthusiasts, and, more significant still, their cost and expense had been also anticipated by the enormous outlay of their earnings in the work upon Devil's Ditch.
As one of its effects, it bestowed on his countenance a quicker mobility than the old Englishman's had possessed, and keener vivacity, but at the expense of a sturdier something, on which these acute endowments seemed to act like dissolving acids.
of France, at his own personal expense, fit out whaling ships from Dunkirk, and politely invite to that town some score or two of families from our own island of Nantucket?
Now as this law, under a modified form, is to this day in force in England; and as it offers in various respects a strange anomaly touching the general law of Fast and Loose-Fish, it is here treated of in a separate chapter, on the same courteous principle that prompts the English railways to be at the expense of a separate car, specially reserved for the accommodation of royalty.
My boy, Liberty does not come from colors, they only show party, and all the liberty you can get out of them is, liberty to get drunk at other people's expense, liberty to ride to the poll in a dirty old cab, liberty to abuse any one that does not wear your color, and to shout yourself hoarse at what you only half-understand -- that's your liberty
Still others, worse yet, would crowd about the bar, and at the expense of the host drink themselves sodden, paying not the least attention to any one, and leaving it to be thought that either they had danced with the bride already, or meant to later on.
Well, the other day I was just feeding him with a few old scraps I picked up by the kitchen door, and Mas'r came along, and said I was feeding him up at his expense, and that he couldn't afford to have every nigger keeping his dog, and ordered me to tie a stone to his neck and throw him in the pond.
This principle being admitted, the justice of every particular case of resistance is reduced to a computation of the quantity of the danger and grievance on the one side, and of the probability and expense of redressing it on the other.
Thus, by the substitu- tion of nickels for gold on a king's-evil day, I not only injured no one, dissatisfied no one, but pleased all concerned and saved four-fifths of that day's national expense into the bargain -- a saving which would have been the equivalent of $800,000 in my day in America.
They had gathered there at eight o'clock that morning to elect a new member, and they had now been drinking beer four hours at the new member's expense.