exposition


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ex·po·si·tion

 (ĕk′spə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. A setting forth of meaning or intent.
2.
a. A statement or rhetorical discourse intended to give information about or an explanation of difficult material.
b. The art or technique of composing such discourses.
3. Music
a. The first part of a composition in sonata form that introduces the themes.
b. The opening section of a fugue.
4. The part of a play that provides the background information needed to understand the characters and the action.
5. An act or example of exposing.
6. A public exhibition or show, as of artistic or industrial developments.

[Middle English exposicioun, from Old French exposition, from Latin expositiō, expositiōn-, from expositus, past participle of expōnere, to expound; see expound.]

ex·pos′i·tive (ĭk-spŏz′ĭ-tĭv), ex·pos′i·to′ry (-tôr′ē) adj.
ex·pos′i·tor n.

exposition

(ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a systematic, usually written statement about, commentary on, or explanation of a specific subject
2. the act of expounding or setting forth information or a viewpoint
3. (Commerce) a large public exhibition, esp of industrial products or arts and crafts
4. the act of exposing or the state of being exposed
5. (Theatre) the part of a play, novel, etc, in which the theme and main characters are introduced
6. (Classical Music) music the first statement of the subjects or themes of a movement in sonata form or a fugue
7. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the exhibiting of the consecrated Eucharistic Host or a relic for public veneration
[C14: from Latin expositiō a setting forth, from expōnere to display; see exponent]
ˌexpoˈsitional adj

ex•po•si•tion

(ˌɛk spəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a large-scale public exhibition or show: an automobile exposition.
2. the act of expounding, setting forth, or explaining.
3. a detailed statement or explanation; explanatory treatise.
4. the act of presenting to view; display.
5. the first section of a fugue or a sonata form, in which the principal themes normally are introduced.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin expositiō=exposi-, variant s. of expōnere (see expound) + -tiō -tion]
ex`po•si′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exposition - a systematic interpretation or explanation (usually written) of a specific topic
philosophizing - the exposition (often superficially) of a particular philosophy
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
2.exposition - a collection of things (goods or works of art etc.) for public displayexposition - a collection of things (goods or works of art etc.) for public display
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
art exhibition - an exhibition of art objects (paintings or statues)
peepshow, raree-show - an exhibition of pictures or objects viewed through a small hole or magnifying glass
fair - a competitive exhibition of farm products; "she won a blue ribbon for her baking at the county fair"
3.exposition - an account that sets forth the meaning or intent of a writing or discourse; "we would have understood the play better if there had been some initial exposition of the background"
explanation, account - a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.; "the explanation was very simple"; "I expected a brief account"
4.exposition - (music) the section of a movement (especially in sonata form) where the major musical themes first occur
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner

exposition

noun
1. explanation, account, description, interpretation, illustration, presentation, commentary, critique, exegesis, explication, elucidation Her speech was an exposition of her beliefs in freedom and justice.
2. exhibition, show, fair, display, demonstration, presentation, expo (informal) an art exposition

exposition

noun
2. A large public display, as of goods or works of art:
Translations
تَفْسيرعَرْض، مَعْرَض
výkladvýstava
gennemgangredegørelseudstilling
expónemzetközi vásár
ítarleg skÿringvörusÿning
izklāstsizskaidrojumsizstādeskaidrojums

exposition

[ˌekspəˈzɪʃən] N
1. [of facts, theories] → exposición f
to give an exposition of sthhacer una exposición de algo
2. (= exhibition) → exposición f

exposition

[ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən] n
[theory] → exposition f
(= show) → exposition f

exposition

n
(of facts, theory)Darlegung f, → Exposition f (geh); (explanatory) → Erklärung f, → Erläuterung f; (of literature, text)Kommentar m(of zu), Erläuterung f; (Mus) → Exposition f
(= exhibition)Ausstellung f

exposition

[ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃn] n (frm) → esposizione f

exposition

(ekspəˈziʃən) noun
1. a detailed explanation (of a subject).
2. (abbreviation ˈexpo) an exhibition. a trade exposition.

exposition

n. exposición, demostración, exhibición.
References in classic literature ?
Then again Joe plunged into the exposition of his idea.
She stopped to observe the effect of what she believed a rather clear and significant exposition of Jessie's and George's possible situation.
They were in the towns in harvest time, near the lumber camps in the winter, in the cities when the men came there; if a regiment were encamped, or a railroad or canal being made, or a great exposition getting ready, the crowd of women were on hand, living in shanties or saloons or tenement rooms, sometimes eight or ten of them together.
For was it not," said Joe, with his old air of lucid exposition, "that my only wish were to be useful to you, I should not have had the honour of breaking wittles in the company and abode of gentlemen.
Poor Dolly's exposition of her simple Raveloe theology fell rather unmeaningly on Silas's ears, for there was no word in it that could rouse a memory of what he had known as religion, and his comprehension was quite baffled by the plural pronoun, which was no heresy of Dolly's, but only her way of avoiding a presumptuous familiarity.
Reference was at first made to the chaplain for an exposition of its contents.
As though the very stars in their courses were working for this young wizard with the talking wire, the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia opened its doors exactly two months after the telephone had learned to talk.
I would here willingly have proceeded to exhibit the whole chain of truths which I deduced from these primary but as with a view to this it would have been necessary now to treat of many questions in dispute among the earned, with whom I do not wish to be embroiled, I believe that it will be better for me to refrain from this exposition, and only mention in general what these truths are, that the more judicious may be able to determine whether a more special account of them would conduce to the public advantage.
But were an exposition of the term "inhabitants" to be admitted which would confine the stipulated privileges to citizens alone, the difficulty is diminished only, not removed.
He was in the midst of his exposition when the door from the corridor opened slowly and without noise.
He complicated this exordium by an exposition in which he painted the power and the deeds of the cardinal, that incomparable minister, that conqueror of past minister, that conqueror of past ministers, that example for ministers to come--deeds and power which none could thwart with impunity.
The confidence she felt in her own powers of exposition was a motive force that overcame all resistance.