exposition


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ex·po·si·tion

 (ĕk′spə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. A setting forth of meaning or intent.
2.
a. A statement or rhetorical discourse intended to give information about or an explanation of difficult material.
b. The art or technique of composing such discourses.
3. Music
a. The first part of a composition in sonata form that introduces the themes.
b. The opening section of a fugue.
4. The part of a play that provides the background information needed to understand the characters and the action.
5. An act or example of exposing.
6. A public exhibition or show, as of artistic or industrial developments.

[Middle English exposicioun, from Old French exposition, from Latin expositiō, expositiōn-, from expositus, past participle of expōnere, to expound; see expound.]

ex·pos′i·tive (ĭk-spŏz′ĭ-tĭv), ex·pos′i·to′ry (-tôr′ē) adj.
ex·pos′i·tor n.

exposition

(ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a systematic, usually written statement about, commentary on, or explanation of a specific subject
2. the act of expounding or setting forth information or a viewpoint
3. (Commerce) a large public exhibition, esp of industrial products or arts and crafts
4. the act of exposing or the state of being exposed
5. (Theatre) the part of a play, novel, etc, in which the theme and main characters are introduced
6. (Classical Music) music the first statement of the subjects or themes of a movement in sonata form or a fugue
7. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the exhibiting of the consecrated Eucharistic Host or a relic for public veneration
[C14: from Latin expositiō a setting forth, from expōnere to display; see exponent]
ˌexpoˈsitional adj

ex•po•si•tion

(ˌɛk spəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a large-scale public exhibition or show: an automobile exposition.
2. the act of expounding, setting forth, or explaining.
3. a detailed statement or explanation; explanatory treatise.
4. the act of presenting to view; display.
5. the first section of a fugue or a sonata form, in which the principal themes normally are introduced.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin expositiō=exposi-, variant s. of expōnere (see expound) + -tiō -tion]
ex`po•si′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.exposition - a systematic interpretation or explanation (usually written) of a specific topic
philosophizing - the exposition (often superficially) of a particular philosophy
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
2.exposition - a collection of things (goods or works of art etc.) for public displayexposition - a collection of things (goods or works of art etc.) for public display
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
art exhibition - an exhibition of art objects (paintings or statues)
peepshow, raree-show - an exhibition of pictures or objects viewed through a small hole or magnifying glass
fair - a competitive exhibition of farm products; "she won a blue ribbon for her baking at the county fair"
3.exposition - an account that sets forth the meaning or intent of a writing or discourse; "we would have understood the play better if there had been some initial exposition of the background"
explanation, account - a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.; "the explanation was very simple"; "I expected a brief account"
4.exposition - (music) the section of a movement (especially in sonata form) where the major musical themes first occur
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner

exposition

noun
1. explanation, account, description, interpretation, illustration, presentation, commentary, critique, exegesis, explication, elucidation Her speech was an exposition of her beliefs in freedom and justice.
2. exhibition, show, fair, display, demonstration, presentation, expo (informal) an art exposition

exposition

noun
2. A large public display, as of goods or works of art:
Translations
تَفْسيرعَرْض، مَعْرَض
výkladvýstava
gennemgangredegørelseudstilling
expónemzetközi vásár
ítarleg skÿringvörusÿning
izklāstsizskaidrojumsizstādeskaidrojums

exposition

[ˌekspəˈzɪʃən] N
1. [of facts, theories] → exposición f
to give an exposition of sthhacer una exposición de algo
2. (= exhibition) → exposición f

exposition

[ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən] n
[theory] → exposition f
(= show) → exposition f

exposition

n
(of facts, theory)Darlegung f, → Exposition f (geh); (explanatory) → Erklärung f, → Erläuterung f; (of literature, text)Kommentar m(of zu), Erläuterung f; (Mus) → Exposition f
(= exhibition)Ausstellung f

exposition

[ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃn] n (frm) → esposizione f

exposition

(ekspəˈziʃən) noun
1. a detailed explanation (of a subject).
2. (abbreviation ˈexpo) an exhibition. a trade exposition.

exposition

n. exposición, demostración, exhibición.
References in classic literature ?
I refer to the address which I delivered at the opening of the Atlanta Cotton states and International Exposition, at Atlanta, Ga.
A FOOLISH Fellow who had been told that he was a great man believed it, and got himself appointed a Commissioner to the Interasylum Exposition of Preserved Idiots.
Everybody was going to the famous Paris Exposition--I, too, was going to the Paris Exposition.
I must say and express fully the following points: first, exposition of the value to be attached to public opinion and to decorum; secondly, exposition of religious significance of marriage; thirdly, if need be, reference to the calamity possibly ensuing to our son; fourthly, reference to the unhappiness likely to result to herself.
To this exposition he was obliged to attend near a quarter of an hour, though with great violence to his natural impetuosity, before he was suffered to speak.
We were saying, if I am not mistaken, that he who wanted to see them in their perfect beauty must take a longer and more circuitous way, at the end of which they would appear; but that we could add on a popular exposition of them on a level with the discussion which had preceded.
Everything seemed so simple and clear in Speranski's exposition that Prince Andrew involuntarily agreed with him about everything.
exposition of noumena offer a rich field for what Lewes calls "the
In this discourse Zarathustra opens his exposition of the doctrine of relativity in morality, and declares all morality to be a mere means to power.
Else will it be like the authority, claimed by the Church of Rome, which under pretext of exposition of Scripture, doth not stick to add and alter; and to pronounce that which they do not find; and by show of antiquity, to introduce novelty.
I was a lord of thought, the master of my vocabulary and of the totality of my experience, unerringly capable of selecting my data and building my exposition.
I was saying," said the intruder, without attending to the interrogatives, - "I was saying that I am not at all pushed for time - that the business upon which I took the liberty of calling, is of no pressing importance - in short, that I can very well wait until you have finished your Exposition.