expressionism


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ex·pres·sion·ism

or Ex·pres·sion·ism  (ĭk-sprĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in the arts during the early 1900s that emphasized distortion of external reality in order to express the artist's subjective experience.

ex·pres′sion·ist n.
ex·pres′sion·is′tic adj.
ex·pres′sion·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

expressionism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Art Movements) (sometimes capital) an artistic and literary movement originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century, which sought to express emotions rather than to represent external reality: characterized by the use of symbolism and of exaggeration and distortion
exˈpressionist n, adj
exˌpressionˈistic adj

ex•pres•sion•ism

(ɪkˈsprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n. (often cap.)
1. a style of art in which forms derived from nature are distorted and colors are intensified for expressive purposes.
2. a style in literature and theater depicting the subjective aspect of experience esp. by using symbolism and nonnaturalistic settings.
[1905–10; < German Expressionismus]
ex•pres′sion•ist, n., adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.
ex•pres`sion•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Expressionism

a movement in the 20th century that attempted to express feeling and emotion directly by distorting forms, choosing violent subject matter and harsh colors, and keeping the overall design out of balance. — Expressionist, n.Expressionistic, adj.
See also: Art

expressionism

(c. 1905–25) An emphasis on pictorial distortion or chromatic exaggeration within any art of any period. The movement emphasizing heightened emotion and the artist’s subjective vision, and was characterized by bold brushwork and stylized forms. Influenced by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, and Fauvism, the movement includes the more specific groups of Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.expressionism - an art movement early in the 20th centuryexpressionism - an art movement early in the 20th century; the artist's subjective expression of inner experiences was emphasized; an inner feeling was expressed through a distorted rendition of reality
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
neoexpressionism - an art movement based on expressionism; developed in 1980s in Europe and United States; crudely drawn garish paintings
supra expressionism - a movement that tried to go beyond expressionism
Translations
ekspresjonisme
expressionismo

expressionism

[eksˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nexpresionismo m

expressionism

[ɪkˈsprɛʃənɪzəm] nexpressionnisme m

expressionism

expressionism

[ɪksˈprɛʃnɪzm] nespressionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Here Scotto di Luzio's style is close to Expressionism, bringing to mind Munch or Grosz, but ground up into a mixture made from electronic and computer graphics.
draws strength from the modern streams, while remaining above the conflicts, and criticizing Russian Constructivism, as well as German Expressionism, accusing them of 'vicious ejaculations'.
The first begins with a superficial, comparative discussion of positivism versus phenomenology and then touches, with similar brevity, on aspects of romanticism, expressionism, rationalism and classicism.
D'Amboise's choreography gets into hot water when he tackles dramatic expressionism.
Diverse sources such as Impressionism, Pointillism, Precisionism, Abstract Expressionism, and Asian art have inspired Jacquette's paintings and works on paper.
The '80s saw the rise of neo-expressionism--a response to those initially reacting to the raw, emotive canvases of Abstract Expressionism.
This tendency was reinforced by the nationalistic thrust of 20th-century Mexican culture, just as abstract expressionism in the United States declared its independence from Europe.
He could claim to be as Functionalist as any of his peers - more than most - but for Pevsner et al he was tarred with the brush of Expressionism and therefore not to be taken seriously.
In the yawning gulf between V-E Day and Andy Warhol, Abstract Expressionism defined American art.
Purchased with funds provided by Tom and Gretchen Holce of Portland, the collection includes works by some of the most important American artists from the Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, and Post-Painterly Abstraction movements of the 1950s and 1960s: Jackson Pollock, Hans Hofmann, David Smith, Helen Frankenthaler, Friedel Dzubas, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Anthony Caro, and others.
Their expressionism is virtual, and is in fact beside their operatic aesthetic point.
German expressionism would be unthinkable without Freud,'' Barron, senior curator of 20th-century art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, said in an interview.