extempore


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

ex·tem·po·re

 (ĭk-stĕm′pə-rē)
adj.
Spoken, carried out, or composed with little or no preparation or forethought: an extempore speech.
adv.
In an extemporaneous manner.

[Latin ex tempore : ex, of; see ex- + tempore, ablative of tempus, time.]

extempore

(ɪkˈstɛmpərɪ)
adv, adj
without planning or preparation; impromptu
[C16: from Latin ex tempore instantaneously, from ex-1 out of + tempus time]

ex•tem•po•re

(ɪkˈstɛm pə ri)

adv.
in an extemporaneous manner.
[1545–55; < Latin: literally, out of the time, at the moment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extempore - with little or no preparation or forethought; "his ad-lib comments showed poor judgment"; "an extemporaneous piano recital"; "an extemporary lecture"; "an extempore skit"; "an impromptu speech"; "offhand excuses"; "trying to sound offhanded and reassuring"; "an off-the-cuff toast"; "a few unrehearsed comments"
unprepared - without preparation; not prepared for; "unprepared remarks"; "the shock was unprepared"; "our treaty makers approached their immensely difficult problems unprepared"- R.E.Danielson
Adv.1.extempore - without prior preparation; "he spoke extemporaneously"

extempore

adjective
Spoken, performed, or composed with little or no preparation or forethought:
Informal: off-the-cuff.
Translations
إرْتِجالا، مُرْتَجَل
improviseret
rögtönözve
undirbúningslaust
ekspromtunepasiruošus
bez sagatavošanās
bez prípravy
hazırlıksız

extempore

[eksˈtempərɪ]
A. ADVde improviso
B. ADJimprovisado

extempore

adj prayerimprovisiert; to give an extempore speecheine Rede aus dem Stegreif halten, extemporieren (geh)

extempore

[ɪksˈtɛmpərɪ] (frm)
1. advsenza preparazione
2. adjestemporaneo/a

extempore

(ikˈstempəri) adverb
without previous thought or preparation. to speak extempore.
References in classic literature ?
You may do it extempore, for it is nothing but roaring.
This lonely spot, once used for an extempore burying-place, after a sanguinary BATTUE between the French and Austrians, is the perfection of desolation; there is nothing in sight to mark the hand of man, except the line of weather-beaten whitened posts, set up to indicate the direction of the pass in the OWDAWAKK of winter.
I should much like to try your plan," I said, and, as Sylvie and Bruno happened to run up to us at the moment, I left them to keep the Earl company, and strolled along the platform, making each person and event play its part in an extempore drama for my especial benefit.
Their singing is harsh and discordant; the songs are chiefly extempore, relating to passing circumstances, the persons present, or any trifling object that strikes the attention of the singer.
Owing to these extempore measures, I not only gave my bride credit for certain perfections which have not as yet come to light, but also overlooked a few trifling defects, which, however, glimmered on my perception long before the close of the honeymoon.
The pieces of elephant-meat, surrounded with aromatic leaves, were placed in this extempore oven and covered with hot coals.
Now seals are too wise," Collins explained one day, in a sort of extempore lecture to several of his apprentice trainers.
All works of art should not be detached, but extempore performances.
The fact was, that Tom's heart had already smitten him for not asking his fidus Achates to the feast, although only an extempore affair; and though prudence and the desire to get Martin and Arthur together alone at first had overcome his scruples, he was now heartily glad to open the door, broach another bottle of beer, and hand over the old ham-knuckle to the searching of his old friend's pocket-knife.
It did occur to him that he could perhaps get some help by praying for it; but as the prayers he said every evening were forms learned by heart, he rather shrank from the novelty and irregularity of introducing an extempore passage on a topic of petition for which he was not aware of any precedent.
Mainly instrumental, but with a short vocal inset in the middle -- they show Extempore continuing in its tradition of "composed programmes".
The chapters he devotes to the early verse, to the Latin poems, to elegies and epitaphs, to dramatic prologues, and even to occasional extempore, parodic, and complimentary productions, are as full of interest and engagement as those dealing with the acknowledged weightier works.