extinction


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Related to extinction: Mass extinction, Extinction of Species

ex·tinc·tion

 (ĭk-stĭngk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of extinguishing.
b. The condition of being extinguished.
2. The fact of being extinct or the process of becoming extinct: "The most effective agent in the extinction of species is the pressure of other species" (Alfred R. Wallace).
3. Psychology A reduction or a loss in the strength or rate of a conditioned response when the unconditioned stimulus or reinforcement is withheld.
4. Physiology A gradual decrease in the excitability of a nerve to a previously adequate stimulus, usually resulting in total loss of excitability.
5. Astronomy The dimming of celestial objects, usually measured in magnitudes, due to scattering and absorption of their light as it passes through interstellar dust clouds and the earth's atmosphere.

extinction

(ɪkˈstɪŋkʃən) or

extincture

n
1. the act of making extinct or the state of being extinct
2. the act of extinguishing or the state of being extinguished
3. complete destruction; annihilation
4. (General Physics) physics reduction of the intensity of radiation as a result of absorption or scattering by matter
5. (Astronomy) astronomy the dimming of light from a celestial body as it passes through an absorbing or scattering medium, such as the earth's atmosphere or interstellar dust
6. (Psychology) psychol a process in which the frequency or intensity of a learned response is decreased as a result of reinforcement being withdrawn. Compare habituation

ex•tinc•tion

(ɪkˈstɪŋk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of extinguishing.
2. the state of being extinguished or extinct.
3. the act or process of becoming extinct: the extinction of a species.
4. the reduction or loss of a conditioned response as a result of the absence or withdrawal of reinforcement.
5. the darkness that results from rotation of a thin section to an angle (extinc′tion an`gle) at which plane-polarized light is absorbed by the polarizer.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.extinction - no longer active; extinguished; "the extinction of the volcano"
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
2.extinction - no longer in existenceextinction - no longer in existence; "the extinction of a species"
death - the absence of life or state of being dead; "he seemed more content in death than he had ever been in life"
3.extinction - the reduction of the intensity of radiation as a consequence of absorption and radiation
absorption - (physics) the process in which incident radiated energy is retained without reflection or transmission on passing through a medium; "the absorption of photons by atoms or molecules"
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
scattering - the physical process in which particles are deflected haphazardly as a result of collisions
4.extinction - complete annihilationextinction - complete annihilation; "they think a meteor cause the extinction of the dinosaurs"
annihilation, disintegration - total destruction; "bomb tests resulted in the annihilation of the atoll"
5.extinction - a conditioning process in which the reinforcer is removed and a conditioned response becomes independent of the conditioned stimulus
conditioning - a learning process in which an organism's behavior becomes dependent on the occurrence of a stimulus in its environment
6.extinction - the act of extinguishingextinction - the act of extinguishing; causing to stop burning; "the extinction of the lights"
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"

extinction

noun dying out, death, destruction, abolition, oblivion, extermination, annihilation, eradication, obliteration, excision, extirpation Many species have been hunted to the point of extinction.

extinction

noun
2. The act or fact of dying:
Slang: curtain (used in plural).
Translations
إخْمادإنْقِراض
slukninguddøenudryddelse
sukupuutto
kialváskihalás
aldauîi, útrÿmingslokknun
vyhasnutie
izumrtje
sön metükenmeyok olma

extinction

[ɪksˈtɪŋkʃən] Nextinción f

extinction

[ɪkˈstɪŋkʃən] nextinction f
to face extinction → être menacé(e) d'extinction

extinction

n (of race, family, animal, species, tribe)Aussterben nt; (= annihilation)Ausrottung f; threatened with or faced with or in danger of extinctionvom Aussterben bedroht; this animal was hunted to extinctiondiese Tierart wurde durch Jagen ausgerottet

extinction

[ɪksˈtɪŋkʃn] n (of fire) → estinzione f, spegnimento; (of race) → estinzione f

extinct

(ikˈstiŋkt) adjective
1. (of a type of animal etc) no longer in existence. Mammoths became extinct in prehistoric times.
2. (of a volcano) no longer active. That volcano was thought to be extinct until it suddenly erupted ten years ago.
extinction (ikˈstiŋkʃən) noun
1. making or becoming extinct. the extinction of the species.
2. the act of putting out or extinguishing (fire, hope etc).

ex·tinc·tion

n. extinción; supresión; cesación.
References in classic literature ?
Comparing the humped herds of whales with the humped herds of buffalo, which, not forty years ago, overspread by tens of thousands the prairies of Illinois and Missouri, and shook their iron manes and scowled with their thunder-clotted brows upon the sites of populous river-capitals, where now the polite broker sells you land at a dollar an inch; in such a comparison an irresistible argument would seem furnished, to show that the hunted whale cannot now escape speedy extinction.
Then had followed the news that the producer of this awful event was a stranger, a mighty magician at Arthur's court; that he could have blown out the sun like a candle, and was just going to do it when his mercy was purchased, and he then dissolved his enchantments, and was now recognized and honored as the man who had by his unaided might saved the globe from destruction and its peoples from extinction.
The red fires died slowly down, within the Castle, and presently the shell grew nearly black outside; the angry glare that shone out through the broken arches and innumerable sashless windows, now, reproduced the aspect which the Castle must have borne in the old time when the French spoilers saw the monster bonfire which they had made there fading and spoiling toward extinction.
Elton in particular; but it seemed to her reasonable that at Harriet's age, and with the entire extinction of all hope, such a progress might be made towards a state of composure by the time of Mr.
And so well was she able to answer her own expectations, that when she joined them at dinner only two hours after she had first suffered the extinction of all her dearest hopes, no one would have supposed from the appearance of the sisters, that Elinor was mourning in secret over obstacles which must divide her for ever from the object of her love, and that Marianne was internally dwelling on the perfections of a man, of whose whole heart she felt thoroughly possessed, and whom she expected to see in every carriage which drove near their house.
Such an event ought to be neither presumed nor desired; because an extinction of parties necessarily implies either a universal alarm for the public safety, or an absolute extinction of liberty.
It compels all nations, on pain of extinction, to adopt the bourgeois mode of production; it compels them to introduce what it calls civilisation into their midst, i.
Why, oh, why will you not learn to live in amity with your fellows, must you ever go on down the ages to your final extinction but little above the plane of the dumb brutes that serve you
In the ensuing battle he had lost two of his own men, but the punishment inflicted upon the marauders had been severe almost to extinction.
Indeed, I found afterwards that horses, cattle, sheep, dogs, had followed the Ichthyosaurus into extinction.
The sudden extinction of the moccoletti, the darkness which had replaced the light, and the silence which had succeeded the turmoil, had left in Franz's mind a certain depression which was not free from uneasiness.
He was her distant relative, but the nearest who had survived the gradual extinction of her family; so that no more eligible shelter could be found for the rich and high-born Lady Eleanore Rochcliffe than within the Province House of a transatlantic colony.