extraneous


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Related to extraneous: extraneous root

ex·tra·ne·ous

 (ĭk-strā′nē-əs)
adj.
1. Not constituting an essential or vital element or part: school rules forbidding extraneous clothing like hats.
2. Unrelated to the topic or matter at hand. See Synonyms at irrelevant.
3. Coming from the outside: extraneous noise.

[From Latin extrāneus, from extrā, outside; see extra-.]

ex·tra′ne·ous·ly adv.
ex·tra′ne·ous·ness n.

extraneous

(ɪkˈstreɪnɪəs)
adj
1. not essential
2. not pertinent or applicable; irrelevant
3. coming from without; of external origin
4. not belonging; unrelated to that to which it is added or in which it is contained
[C17: from Latin extrāneus external, from extrā outside]
exˈtraneously adv
exˈtraneousness n

ex•tra•ne•ous

(ɪkˈstreɪ ni əs)

adj.
1. introduced or coming from without; not forming an essential or proper part: extraneous substances in our water.
2. not pertinent; irrelevant: an extraneous remark.
[1630–40; < Latin extrāneus external, foreign <extr(a)- extra-]
ex•tra′ne•ous•ly, adv.
ex•tra′ne•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extraneous - not pertinent to the matter under consideration; "an issue extraneous to the debate"; "the price was immaterial"; "mentioned several impertinent facts before finally coming to the point"
irrelevant - having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue; "an irrelevant comment"; "irrelevant allegations"
2.extraneous - not essential; "the ballet struck me as extraneous and somewhat out of keeping with the rest of the play"
extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"
3.extraneous - not belonging to that in which it is contained; introduced from an outside source; "water free of extraneous matter"; "foreign particles in milk"
adulterant, adulterating - making impure or corrupt by adding extraneous materials; "the adulterating effect of extraneous materials"
4.extraneous - coming from the outside; "extraneous light in the camera spoiled the photograph"; "relying upon an extraneous income"; "disdaining outside pressure groups"
extrinsic - not forming an essential part of a thing or arising or originating from the outside; "extrinsic evidence"; "an extrinsic feature of the new building"; "that style is something extrinsic to the subject"; "looking for extrinsic aid"

extraneous

adjective
2. irrelevant, inappropriate, unrelated, unconnected, immaterial, beside the point, impertinent, inadmissible, off the subject, inapplicable, inapt, inapposite Let's not allow ourselves to be sidetracked by extraneous questions.
3. external, foreign, strange, alien, exotic, out of place, extrinsic, adventitious extraneous influences affecting his state of mind

extraneous

adjective
1. Not part of the essential nature of a thing:
2. Not relevant or pertinent to the subject; not applicable:
Translations

extraneous

[eksˈtreɪnɪəs] ADJ [influence] → extraño, externo; [issue] → irrelevante, superfluo
extraneous toajeno a

extraneous

[ɪkˈstreɪniəs] adj
extraneous to → étranger/ère à

extraneous

adj (form)
(= from outside) noisevon außen; influenceäußere(r, s), extern (geh); extraneous matter (Tech, Med) → Fremdstoffe pl; (solid) → Fremdkörper pl
(= not relevant) matter, material, issue, detail, thoughtirrelevant, unwesentlich; extraneous matters/issuesUnwesentliches nt; to avoid all extraneous issuesalles vermeiden, was nicht zur Sache gehört; to feel extraneous (person)sich (dat)überflüssig vorkommen; extraneous to somethingfür etw irrelevant

extraneous

[ɪksˈtreɪnɪəs] adj (frm) extraneous (to)estraneo/a (a)

ex·tra·ne·ous

a. extraño-a, sin relación con un organismo o fuera del mismo.
References in classic literature ?
It had crossed her thought like some unsought, extraneous impression.
Hawkeye listened while he coolly adjusted his flint and reloaded his rifle; but the sounds, wanting the extraneous assistance of scene and sympathy, failed to awaken his slumbering emotions.
The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out, be- come ragged, cease to be comfortable, cease to protect the body from winter, disease, and death.
I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give.
As I was picking up a skin that lay upon the ground, I was stung by a serpent that left his sting in my finger; I at least picked an extraneous substance about the bigness of a hair out of the wound, which I imagined was the sting.
The collective sense of the State legislatures can never be influenced by extraneous circumstances of that sort; a consideration which alone ought to satisfy us that the discrimination apprehended would never be attempted.
There are features in the Constitution which warrant each of these suppositions; and as far as either of them is well founded, it shows that the convention must have been compelled to sacrifice theoretical propriety to the force of extraneous considerations.
Having a nervous system and brains he is the possessor of temperament, which is affected variously by extraneous causes.
If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life would be relieved of all that was unbearable; the unjust might go his way, delivered from the aspirations and remorse of his more upright twin; and the just could walk steadfastly and securely on his upward path, doing the good things in which he found his pleasure, and no longer exposed to disgrace and penitence by the hands of this extraneous evil.
But to produce this effect by the mere spectacle is a less artistic method, and dependent on extraneous aids.
Of course, later I blamed myself, and my pride underwent a fall; but no extraneous person except yourself knows of the affair, and in any case it does not matter.
The sudden fallings of the trees,” said Marmaduke, “are the most dangerous accidents in the forest, for they are not to be foreseen, being impelled by no winds, nor any extraneous or visible cause against which we can guard.