extraverted


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Related to extraverted: ENFP

ex·tra·vert·ed

 (ĕk′strə-vûr′tĭd)
adj.
Variant of extroverted.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.extraverted - being concerned with the social and physical environment
extraversive, extroversive - directed outward; marked by interest in others or concerned with external reality

extraverted

adjective
Disposed to be open, sociable, and talkative:
References in periodicals archive ?
This parasite appears to cause similar neurological changes in humans, making men more introverted and women more extraverted.
Female workers who are more open to new experiences, are extraverted, exhibit strong decision making power, and possess higher levels of grit and conscientiousness are better rewarded in the labor market," World Bank said.
Further, employees who are more extraverted and agreeable may be preferred by supervisors, so that they are also less likely to receive negative feedback.
This awareness could help us understand why an introverted person in an extraverted church would probably eventually leave.
Agreeable and extraverted children are more socially competent concurrently and across time (Gest, 1997;Shiner,2000 &Asendorpf&VanAken,2003).
High scorers on these measures are generally considered to be extraverted and low scorers introverted.
Extraversion or the E dimension evaluates the extraverted aspects of personality, like being outgoing, talkative, positive, or in need of external stimulation.
Employees who are more extraverted or agreeable construct more social bonds with co-workers and as such, feel more attached to other employees at work.
This result is consistent with previous results indicating that sexting is a means of socialization and interpersonal relationship (Doring, 2014), so that extraverted people may feel particularly attracted to it.
If you take an extravert you will find that his unconscious has an introverted quality, because all the extraverted qualities are played out in his consciousness and the introverted are left in the unconscious'.
By averaging subjects' MCS contributions, having those averages count as observations, and using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, we find evidence that extraverted subjects make lower MCS contributions than neurotic (p [approximately equal to] 0.
2013) in that those who identified having a more extraverted personality were also more likely to have a FWBR during the semester.