extremely


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ex·treme

 (ĭk-strēm′)
adj.
1. Most remote in any direction; outermost or farthest: the extreme edge of the field.
2. Being in or attaining the greatest or highest degree; very intense: extreme pleasure; extreme pain.
3. Being far beyond the norm: an extreme conservative. See Synonyms at excessive.
4. Of the greatest severity; drastic: took extreme measures to conserve fuel.
5. Biology
a. Characterized by severe, usually oxygen-poor environmental conditions.
b. Having an affinity for such conditions: an extreme microorganism.
6. Sports
a. Very dangerous or difficult: extreme rafting.
b. Participating or tending to participate in a very dangerous or difficult sport: an extreme skier.
7. Archaic Final; last.
n.
1. The greatest or utmost degree or point.
2. Either of the two things situated at opposite ends of a range: the extremes of boiling and freezing.
3. An extreme condition.
4. An immoderate, drastic expedient: resorted to extremes in the emergency.
5. Mathematics
a. The first or last term of a ratio or a series.
b. A maximum or minimum value of a function.
6. Logic The major or minor term of a syllogism.
Idiom:
in the extreme
To an extreme degree: eccentric in the extreme.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin extrēmus; see eghs in Indo-European roots.]

ex·treme′ly adv.
ex·treme′ness n.

extremely

(ɪkˈstriːmlɪ)
adv
1. to the extreme; exceedingly
2. (intensifier): I behaved extremely badly.
Usage: In strict usage adverbs of degree such as extremely, too, quite, really, and very are used only to qualify adjectives: he is very happy; she is extremely sad. By this rule, these words should not be used to qualify past participles that follow the verb to be, since they would then be technically qualifying verbs. With the exception of certain participles, such as tired or disappointed, that have come to be regarded as adjectives, all other past participles are qualified by adverbs such as much, greatly, seriously, or excessively: he has been much (not extremely) inconvenienced; she has been excessively (not too) criticized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.extremely - to a high degree or extent; favorably or with much respect; "highly successful"; "He spoke highly of her"; "does not think highly of his writing"; "extremely interesting"
2.extremely - to an extreme degree; "extremely cold"; "extremely unpleasant"

extremely

extremely

adverb
To a high degree:
Informal: awful.
Chiefly Regional: mighty.
Translations
extrémněnesmírně
ekstremtmegetoverordentligsærdeles
äärimmäisenerittäin
izuzetno
ákaflega; fram úr hófi
きょくたんにずいぶん極度に極端に随分
극도로
izredno
extremt
อย่างมาก
vô cùng

extremely

[ɪksˈtriːmlɪ] ADVsumamente, extremadamente
it is extremely difficultes dificilísimoes sumamente difícil, es extremadamente difícil
he did extremely well in the examel examen le salió sumamente bien
we are extremely gladnos alegramos muchísimo
it's extremely unlikely that you'll wines muy poco probable que ganes

extremely

[ɪkˈstriːmli] advextrêmement

extremely

adväußerst; important, high, lowextrem; was it difficult? — extremely!war es schwierig? — sehr!

extremely

[ɪksˈtriːmlɪ] advestremamente

extreme

(ikˈstriːm) adjective
1. very great, especially much more than usual. extreme pleasure; He is in extreme pain.
2. very far or furthest in any direction, especially out from the centre. the extreme south-western tip of England; Politically, he belongs to the extreme left.
3. very violent or strong; not ordinary or usual. He holds extreme views on education.
noun
1. something as far, or as different, as possible from something else. the extremes of sadness and joy.
2. the greatest degree of any state, especially if unpleasant. The extremes of heat in the desert make life uncomfortable.
exˈtremely adverb
very. extremely kind.
exˈtremism noun
the holding of views which are as far from being moderate as possible.
exˈtremist noun, adjective
exˈtremity (-ˈstre-) plural exˈtremities noun
1. the farthest point. The two poles represent the extremities of the earth's axis.
2. an extreme degree; the quality of being extreme. Their suffering reached such extremities that many died.
3. a situation of great danger or distress. They need help in this extremity.
4. the parts of the body furthest from the middle eg the hands and feet.
in the extreme
very. dangerous in the extreme.
to extremes
very far, especially further than is thought to be reasonable. She can never express an opinion without going to extremes.

extremely

جِدَّاً nesmírně ekstremt äußerst άκρως extremadamente äärimmäisen extrêmement izuzetno estremamente 極度に 극도로 uiterst ekstremt nadzwyczaj extremamente чрезвычайно extremt อย่างมาก aşırı derecede vô cùng 极端地
References in classic literature ?
But though it was not far past the middle of September, the heavy clouds and strong north-easterly wind combined to render the day extremely cold and dreary; and the journey seemed a very long one, for, as Smith observed, the roads were 'very heavy'; and certainly, his horse was very heavy too: it crawled up the hills, and crept down them, and only condescended to shake its sides in a trot where the road was at a dead level or a very gentle slope, which was rarely the case in those rugged regions; so that it was nearly one o'clock before we reached the place of our destination.
I say written FOR children because the new psychological business of writing ABOUT them as though they were small pills or hatched in some especially scientific method is extremely popular today.
These being over, the conversation began to be (as the phrase is) extremely brilliant.
The Countess Lidia Ivanovna had, as a very young and sentimental girl, been married to a wealthy man of high rank, an extremely good-natured, jovial, and extremely dissipated rake.
He had an extremely disturbing air of being everlastingly ready (even when seated at table at my right hand before a plate of salt beef) to grapple with some impending calamity.
The quantity of game, therefore, brought in by the hunters was extremely scanty, and it was frequently necessary to put all hands on very moderate allowance.
Why, you know, sir,' returned Brass, venturing to be more familiar: '--the fact is, sir, that any allusion to these little combinings together, of friends, for objects in themselves extremely laudable, but which the law terms conspiracies, are--you take me, sir?
The only difference between organisms which annually produce eggs or seeds by the thousand, and those which produce extremely few, is, that the slow-breeders would require a few more years to people, under favourable conditions, a whole district, let it be ever so large.
The prospect of the Netherfield ball was extremely agreeable to every female of the family.
The objects of interest are extremely numerous, and the climate is remarkably cheerful and sunny.
All this spoken extremely fast obliged Miss Bates to stop for breath; and Emma said something very civil about the excellence of Miss Fairfax's handwriting.
Palmer; "for we know all about it, I assure you; and I admire your taste very much, for I think he is extremely handsome.

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