eyesight


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eye·sight

 (ī′sīt′)
n.
1. The faculty of sight; vision.
2. Range of vision; view.

eyesight

(ˈaɪˌsaɪt)
n
the ability to see; faculty of sight

sight

(saɪt)

n.
1. the power or faculty of seeing; perception of objects by use of the eyes; vision.
2. the act or fact of seeing.
3. one's range of vision on some specific occasion: Land is in sight.
4. a view; glimpse.
5. mental perception or regard; judgment.
6. something seen or worth seeing; spectacle: the sights of London.
7. a person or thing that is unusual, shocking, or distressing to see: He was a sight after the brawl.
8. Chiefly Dial. a multitude; great deal: It's a sight better to work than to starve.
9. an observation taken with a surveying, navigating, or other instrument to ascertain an exact position or direction.
10. any of various mechanical or optical viewing devices, as on a firearm, for aiding the eye in aiming.
11. Obs. skill; insight.
v.t.
12. to see, glimpse, notice, or observe: to sight a ship to the north.
13. to take a sight or observation of, esp. with surveying or navigating instruments.
14. to direct or aim by a sight or sights, as a firearm.
15. to provide with sights or adjust the sights of, as a gun.
v.i.
16. to aim or observe through a sight.
17. to look carefully in a certain direction.
Idioms:
1. at first sight, after only one brief glimpse: love at first sight.
2. at sight,
a. immediately upon seeing.
b. on presentation: a draft payable at sight.
3. by a long sight, (usu. with a negative) to an extreme degree: You haven't finished yet by a long sight.
4. catch sight of, to get a glimpse of; espy.
5. on sight, immediately upon seeing.
6. out of sight,
a. beyond one's range of vision.
b. Informal. exceedingly or extravagantly high: The price is out of sight.
c. Slang. (often used as an interjection) fantastic; marvelous.
7. sight for sore eyes, one whose appearance is cause for relief or gladness.
8. sight unseen, without previous examination: We bought it sight unseen.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English (ge)sihth, gesiht (c. Old Saxon gisiht, Old High German (ge)sicht sight, face; compare y-), derivative of sēon to see1; see -th1]
sight′er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eyesight - normal use of the faculty of visioneyesight - normal use of the faculty of vision
visual modality, visual sense, vision, sight - the ability to see; the visual faculty

eyesight

noun vision, sight, observation, perception, ability to see, range of vision, power of seeing, power of sight He suffered from poor eyesight and could no longer read properly.

eyesight

noun
The faculty of seeing:
Archaic: light.
Translations
بَصَربَصَر ، نَظَر
zrak
syn
näkökyky
vid
sjón
視力
시력
vid
syn
สายตา
görme yeteneğigörme yetisi
thị lực

eyesight

[ˈaɪsaɪt] Nvista f
to have good/poor eyesighttener buena/mala vista

eyesight

[ˈaɪsaɪt] nvue feye socket norbite f

eyesight

[ˈaɪˌsaɪt] nvista

eye

(ai) noun
1. the part of the body with which one sees. Open your eyes; She has blue eyes.
2. anything like or suggesting an eye, eg the hole in a needle, the loop or ring into which a hook connects etc.
3. a talent for noticing and judging a particular type of thing. She has an eye for detail/colour/beauty.
verb
to look at, observe. The boys were eyeing the girls at the dance; The thief eyed the policeman warily.
ˈeyeball noun
1. the whole rounded structure of the eye.
2. the part of the eye between the eyelids.
ˈeyebrow noun
the curved line of hair above each eye.
ˈeye-catching adjective
striking or noticeable, especially if attractive. an eye-catching advertisement.
ˈeyelash noun
one of the (rows of) hairs that grow on the edge of the eyelids. She looked at him through her eyelashes.
ˈeyelet (-lit) noun
a small hole in fabric etc for a cord etc.
ˈeyelid noun
the movable piece of skin that covers or uncovers the eye.
ˈeye-opener noun
something that reveals an unexpected fact etc. Our visit to their office was a real eye-opener – they are so inefficient!
ˈeye-piece noun
the part of a telescope etc to which one puts one's eye.
ˈeyeshadow noun
a kind of coloured make-up worn around the eyes.
ˈeyesight noun
the ability to see. I have good eyesight.
ˈeyesore noun
something (eg a building) that is ugly to look at.
ˈeye-witness noun
a person who sees something (eg a crime) happen. Eye-witnesses were questioned by the police.
before/under one's very eyes
in front of one, usually with no attempt at concealment. It happened before my very eyes.
be up to the eyes in
to be very busy or deeply involved in or with. She's up to the eyes in work.
close one's eyes to
to ignore (especially something wrong). She closed her eyes to the children's misbehaviour.
in the eyes of
in the opinion of. You've done no wrong in the eyes of the law.
keep an eye on
1. to watch closely. Keep an eye on the patient's temperature.
2. to look after. Keep an eye on the baby while I am out!
lay/set eyes on
to see, especially for the first time. I wish I'd never set eyes on her!
raise one's eyebrows
to (lift one's eyebrows in order to) show surprise.
see eye to eye
to be in agreement. We've never seen eye to eye about this matter.
with an eye to something
with something as an aim. He's doing this with an eye to promotion.
with one's eyes open
with full awareness of what one is doing. I knew what the job would involve – I went into it with my eyes open.

eyesight

بَصَر zrak syn Sehkraft όραση vista näkökyky vue vid vista 視力 시력 gezichtsvermogen syn wzrok visão зрение syn สายตา görme yetisi thị lực 视力

eyesight

n. vista;
v.
to have good ___tener buena ___.

eyesight

n vista
References in classic literature ?
This was all I heard that night before my sister clutched me, as a slumberous offence to the company's eyesight, and assisted me up to bed with such a strong hand that I seemed to have fifty boots on, and to be dangling them all against the edges of the stairs.
It is the malicious pleasure of the East Wind to augment the power of your eyesight, in order, perhaps, that you should see better the perfect humiliation, the hopeless character of your captivity.
I have been using up my eyesight on old characters lately; the fact is, I want a reader for my evenings; but I am fastidious in voices, and I cannot endure listening to an imperfect reader.
By 1652 it had resulted in the loss of Milton's eyesight, previously over-strained by his studies--a sacrifice in which he gloried but which lovers of poetry must always regret, especially since the controversy largely consisted, according to the custom of the time, in a disgusting exchange of personal scurrilities.
His eyesight was shaken and dazzled by the tension of thought and muscle.
Twice had the Annos sought to collect, the first time while Nalasu still retained his eyesight.
Is it your nerves or your eyesight which is failing you?
They may have very good eyesight and all that; but when you ask them to find a man for you, they can't do it--and they have the cheek to come back and say that nobody else could do it.
My eyesight, however, was then perhaps the soundest thing about me, and in a little I had deciphered enough to guess correctly (as it proved) at the whole: -
shouted Joe at this moment, for that piercing eyesight of his beat all the glasses.
My dear Miss Wendermott," he said, "you must pardon the failing eyesight of an old man.
It left scars upon his good-looking face, and nearly robbed him of his eyesight.