eyesore

(redirected from eyesores)
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eye·sore

 (ī′sôr′)
n.
Something, such as a distressed building, that is unpleasant or offensive to view.

eyesore

(ˈaɪˌsɔː)
n
something very ugly

eye•sore

(ˈaɪˌsɔr, ˈaɪˌsoʊr)

n.
something unpleasant to look at.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eyesore - something very ugly and offensive
ugliness - qualities of appearance that do not give pleasure to the senses

eyesore

noun mess, blight, blot, blemish, sight (informal), horror, disgrace, atrocity, ugliness, monstrosity, disfigurement Slums are an eyesore and a health hazard.
Translations
شَيء قَبيح المَنْظَر
rædselskamplet
szemet sértõ
hörmungarsjón
gözü rahatsız edici şey

eyesore

[ˈaɪsɔːʳ] Nmonstruosidad f

eyesore

[ˈaɪsɔːr] nhorreur feye strain eyestrain [ˈaɪstreɪn] n
to get eyestrain → se fatiguer la vue, se fatiguer les yeuxeye test nexamen m de la vue

eyesore

[ˈaɪˌsɔːʳ] npugno in un occhio

eye

(ai) noun
1. the part of the body with which one sees. Open your eyes; She has blue eyes.
2. anything like or suggesting an eye, eg the hole in a needle, the loop or ring into which a hook connects etc.
3. a talent for noticing and judging a particular type of thing. She has an eye for detail/colour/beauty.
verb
to look at, observe. The boys were eyeing the girls at the dance; The thief eyed the policeman warily.
ˈeyeball noun
1. the whole rounded structure of the eye.
2. the part of the eye between the eyelids.
ˈeyebrow noun
the curved line of hair above each eye.
ˈeye-catching adjective
striking or noticeable, especially if attractive. an eye-catching advertisement.
ˈeyelash noun
one of the (rows of) hairs that grow on the edge of the eyelids. She looked at him through her eyelashes.
ˈeyelet (-lit) noun
a small hole in fabric etc for a cord etc.
ˈeyelid noun
the movable piece of skin that covers or uncovers the eye.
ˈeye-opener noun
something that reveals an unexpected fact etc. Our visit to their office was a real eye-opener – they are so inefficient!
ˈeye-piece noun
the part of a telescope etc to which one puts one's eye.
ˈeyeshadow noun
a kind of coloured make-up worn around the eyes.
ˈeyesight noun
the ability to see. I have good eyesight.
ˈeyesore noun
something (eg a building) that is ugly to look at.
ˈeye-witness noun
a person who sees something (eg a crime) happen. Eye-witnesses were questioned by the police.
before/under one's very eyes
in front of one, usually with no attempt at concealment. It happened before my very eyes.
be up to the eyes in
to be very busy or deeply involved in or with. She's up to the eyes in work.
close one's eyes to
to ignore (especially something wrong). She closed her eyes to the children's misbehaviour.
in the eyes of
in the opinion of. You've done no wrong in the eyes of the law.
keep an eye on
1. to watch closely. Keep an eye on the patient's temperature.
2. to look after. Keep an eye on the baby while I am out!
lay/set eyes on
to see, especially for the first time. I wish I'd never set eyes on her!
raise one's eyebrows
to (lift one's eyebrows in order to) show surprise.
see eye to eye
to be in agreement. We've never seen eye to eye about this matter.
with an eye to something
with something as an aim. He's doing this with an eye to promotion.
with one's eyes open
with full awareness of what one is doing. I knew what the job would involve – I went into it with my eyes open.
References in classic literature ?
Probably there was not one of the million or so child-and-cat eyesores at present in existence which she would not have liked.
and when the youth was gone, he muttered, "He has done me no harm, poor wrench, but he is an eyesore to me now, for he is Driscoll, the young gentleman, and I am a--oh, I wish I was dead
The talk of ye," says Tobin, blowing through his moustache and pounding the table with his fist, "is an eyesore to me patience.
There is, in that city of London there, some property of ours which is much at this day what Bleak House was then; I say property of ours, meaning of the suit's, but I ought to call it the property of costs, for costs is the only power on earth that will ever get anything out of it now or will ever know it for anything but an eyesore and a heartsore.
A GROUP of Dewsbury business owners has come together to clean up town centre eyesores - before Kirklees College brings in 1,300 students next year.
The town has enough eyesores without this one on the main road.
In fact, it is regarded as one of our coastal eyesores, some of which are at last being dealt with, as reported in the Chronicle and elsewhere.
That was some three years ago and today we have one of the biggest eyesores in Liverpool - the work has not been completed and the security fencing is in total disarray.
It has become an eyesore since its closure, but limiting my driving to my own locality because of age I have to defer to him regarding the order of eyesores in Wales.
How can Coventry Council and the companies that promote the city allow so many eyesores to exist within an otherwise attractive city centre?
Talking about eyesores, there are very many who believe that the Celtic Manor Resort - occupying the prominent position that it does - is more of an eyesore than any dilapidated old farmhouse could ever be.
Their favourite national landmark was Big Ben and they said disused factories and rundown industrial estates were the worst type of eyesores.