eyestalk

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eye·stalk

 (ī′stôk′)
n.
A movable structure in certain crustaceans, such as crabs and shrimp, that bears an eye at the tip.

eyestalk

(ˈaɪˌstɔːk)
n
(Zoology) a movable stalk bearing a compound eye at its tip: occurs in crustaceans and some molluscs

eye•stalk

(ˈaɪˌstɔk)

n.
a stalk or peduncle upon which an eye is borne, as in a lobster or shrimp.
[1850–55]

eye·stalk

(ī′stôk′)
A movable stalk having a compound eye on its tip, found on crabs, lobsters, and other crustaceans.
References in periodicals archive ?
2007) reported that in Penaeus duorarum (Burkenroad), silver accumulation occurs mainly in the hepatopancreas followed by hemolymph, however, in gill, muscle and eyestalks there was very little silver accumulation.
Reconstruction and analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model for Eriocheir sinensis eyestalks.
Eyestalks are the endocrine center for regulating many physiological mechanisms such as molting, metabolism, sugar balance, heart rate, pigments and gonad maturation.
Two alternative slicing variants of MIH present in the eyestalks of Litopenaeus vannamei, and MIH 1 is the dominated hormone in L.
hanging tag brands, unilaterally extirpating eyestalks, and cutting uropods) were used and resulted in estimated recapture rates for juvenile fleshy prawns (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) from 0.
Broad he completed his dissertation on "The Development and Function of Neurosecretory Sites in the Eyestalks of Larval Palaemonetes (Decapoda: Natantia)" published in part (Biol.
It has been traditionally accepted that ablation of the eyestalks leads to enhanced ecdysteroid secretion and elevates molting (Keller and Schmid; 1979; Chang and Bruce, 1980).
Distinguishing features: Has horned eyestalks and a green-coloured carapace.
Their individual personalities are ultimately defined by the way their mouths move, the voice actors and the distinctive behavior of their two googly eyestalks.
In the lobster's case, the rings can be found on the eyestalks or inside certain parts of the stomach, the researchers said in a paper published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences.
They were controlled from inside by short operators who had to manipulate appendages such as their eyestalks and weapons.