fabric


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fab·ric

 (făb′rĭk)
n.
1.
a. A cloth produced especially by knitting, weaving, or felting fibers.
b. The texture or quality of such cloth.
2. A complex underlying structure: destroyed the very fabric of the ancient abbey during wartime bombing; needs to protect the fabric of civilized society.
3.
a. A method or style of construction.
b. A structural material, such as masonry or timber.
c. A physical structure; a building.

[Middle English fabryke, something constructed, from Old French fabrique, from Latin fabrica, craft, workshop, from faber, fabr-, workman, artificer.]

fabric

(ˈfæbrɪk)
n
1. (Textiles) any cloth made from yarn or fibres by weaving, knitting, felting, etc
2. (Textiles) the texture of a cloth
3. a structure or framework: the fabric of society.
4. a style or method of construction
5. rare a building
6. (Geological Science) the texture, arrangement, and orientation of the constituents of a rock
[C15: from Latin fabrica workshop, from faber craftsman]

fab•ric

(ˈfæb rɪk)

n.
1. a cloth made by weaving, knitting, or felting fibers.
2. the texture of a cloth or material.
3. framework; structure: the fabric of society.
4. the spatial arrangement and orientation of the constituents of a rock.
5. a building; edifice.
6. the method of construction.
[1475–85; (< Middle French fabrique) < Latin fabrica craft, workshop]

fabric

Fabric is cloth or other material produced by weaving cotton, nylon, wool, silk, or other threads together. Fabrics are used for making things such as clothes, curtains, and sheets.

A piece of white fabric was thrown out of the window.
They sell silks and other soft fabrics.

Don't use 'fabric' to refer to a building where machines are used to make things. A building like this is usually called a factory.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fabric - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibersfabric - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
artefact, artifact - a man-made object taken as a whole
aba - a fabric woven from goat hair and camel hair
acrylic - a synthetic fabric
Aertex - a trademark for a loosely woven cotton fabric that is used to make shirts and underwear
alpaca - a thin glossy fabric made of the wool of the Lama pacos, or made of a rayon or cotton imitation of that wool
baize - a bright green fabric napped to resemble felt; used to cover gaming tables
basket weave - a cloth woven of two or more threads interlaced to suggest the weave of a basket
batik - a dyed fabric; a removable wax is used where the dye is not wanted
batiste - a thin plain-weave cotton or linen fabric; used for shirts or dresses
belting - the material of which belts are made
bombazine - a twilled fabric used for dresses; the warp is silk and the weft is worsted; "black bombazine is frequently used for mourning garments"
boucle - a fabric of uneven yarn that has an uneven knobby effect
broadcloth - a closely woven silk or synthetic fabric with a narrow crosswise rib
broadcloth - a densely textured woolen fabric with a lustrous finish
brocade - thick heavy expensive material with a raised pattern
buckram - a coarse cotton fabric stiffened with glue; used in bookbinding and to stiffen clothing
bunting - a loosely woven fabric used for flags, etc.
calico - coarse cloth with a bright print
cambric - a finely woven white linen
camelhair, camel's hair - a soft tan cloth made with the hair of a camel
camlet - a fabric of Asian origin; originally made of silk and camel's hair
camo, camouflage - fabric dyed with splotches of green and brown and black and tan; intended to make the wearer of a garment made of this fabric hard to distinguish from the background
canopy - the umbrellalike part of a parachute that fills with air
canvas, canvass - a heavy, closely woven fabric (used for clothing or chairs or sails or tents)
cashmere - a soft fabric made from the wool of the Cashmere goat
cerecloth - a waterproof waxed cloth once used as a shroud
challis - a soft lightweight fabric (usually printed)
chambray - a lightweight fabric woven with white threads across a colored warp
chenille - a heavy fabric woven with chenille cord; used in rugs and bedspreads
chiffon - a sheer fabric of silk or rayon
chino - a coarse twilled cotton fabric frequently used for uniforms
chintz - a brightly printed and glazed cotton fabric
coating - a heavy fabric suitable for coats
cobweb - a fabric so delicate and transparent as to resemble a web of a spider
corduroy, cord - a cut pile fabric with vertical ribs; usually made of cotton
cotton - fabric woven from cotton fibers
Canton flannel, cotton flannel - a stout cotton fabric with nap on only one side
crape, crepe - a soft thin light fabric with a crinkled surface
cretonne - an unglazed heavy fabric; brightly printed; used for slipcovers and draperies
crinoline - a stiff coarse fabric used to stiffen hats or clothing
damask - a fabric of linen or cotton or silk or wool with a reversible pattern woven into it
dungaree, jean, denim - a coarse durable twill-weave cotton fabric
diamante - fabric covered with glittering ornaments such as sequins or rhinestones
diaper - a fabric (usually cotton or linen) with a distinctive woven pattern of small repeated figures
dimity - a strong cotton fabric with a raised pattern; used for bedcovers and curtains
doeskin - a fine smooth soft woolen fabric
drapery - cloth gracefully draped and arranged in loose folds
duck - a heavy cotton fabric of plain weave; used for clothing and tents
duffel, duffle - a coarse heavy woolen fabric
edging - border consisting of anything placed on the edge to finish something (such as a fringe on clothing or on a rug)
elastic - a fabric made of yarns containing an elastic material
etamin, etamine - a soft cotton or worsted fabric with an open mesh; used for curtains or clothing etc.
faille - a ribbed woven fabric of silk or rayon or cotton
felt - a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers
vulcanized fiber, fibre, fiber - a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or cloth
flannel - a soft light woolen fabric; used for clothing
flannelette - a cotton fabric imitating flannel
fleece - a soft bulky fabric with deep pile; used chiefly for clothing
foulard - a light plain-weave or twill-weave silk or silklike fabric (usually with a printed design)
2.fabric - the underlying structure; "providing a factual framework for future research"; "it is part of the fabric of society"
structure - the manner of construction of something and the arrangement of its parts; "artists must study the structure of the human body"; "the structure of the benzene molecule"

fabric

noun
1. cloth, material, stuff, textile, web small squares of red cotton fabric
2. framework, structure, make-up, organization, frame, foundations, construction, constitution, infrastructure The fabric of society has been deeply damaged.
3. structure, foundations, construction, framework, infrastructure Condensation will eventually cause the fabric of the building to rot away

Fabrics

Acrilan (trademark), alpaca, armure, baize, balbriggan, barathea, barège, batik or battik, batiste, bayadere, beige, bengaline, bird's-eye, bobbinet, bombazine or bombasine, bouclé, brilliantine, broadcloth, brocade, buckskin, bunting, burlap, calamanco, calico, cambric, camlet, cavalry twill, challis or challie, chambray, Charmeuse (trademark), cheesecloth, chenille, cheviot, chiffon, chintz, cilice, ciré, cloqué, cord, corduroy, cotton, cottonade, cotton flannel, covert cloth, crepe or crape, cretonne, Crimplene (trademark), crinoline, cypress or cyprus, Dacron (trademark), damask, delaine, denim, diamanté, dimity, Donegal tweed, drab, drabbet, Dralon (trademark), drugget, duck, dungaree, duvetyn, duvetine, or duvetyne, etamine or etamin, façonné or faconne, faille, fearnought or fearnaught, felt, fishnet, flannel, fleece, folk weave, foulard, frieze, frisé, fur, fustian, gaberdine, galatea, georgette, gingham, gloria, Gore-Tex (trademark), gossamer, grogram, gros de Londres, grosgrain, gunny (chiefly U.S.), Harris Tweed (trademark), hessian, honan, hopsack, huckaback or huck, India print, jaconet, Jacquard or Jacquard weave, jean, jersey, khaki, kincob, knit, lace, lambskin, lamé, lawn, leather, linen, linsey-woolsey, lisle, Lurex (trademark), Lycra (trademark), madras, marabou, marocain, marquisette, marseille or marseilles, melton, messaline, mohair, moire or moiré, moleskin, monk's cloth, moquette, moreen, mousseline, mull, muslin, nainsook, nankeen or nankin, needlecord, net, ninon, nun's cloth or veiling, oilskin, organdie, organza, organzine, Orlon (trademark), ottoman, Oxford, paduasoy, paisley pattern, panne, paramatta or parramatta, peau de soie, percale, percaline, petersham, piña cloth, piqué, plush, pongee, poplin, poult or poult-de-soie, prunella, prunelle, or prunello, rayon, russet, sailcloth, samite, sarcenet or sarsenet, sateen, satin, satinet or satinette, saxony, say (archaic), schappe, scrim, seersucker, sendal, serge, shag, shalloon, shantung, sharkskin, sheeting, shirting, shoddy, silesia, silk, silkaline, slipper satin, spandex, spun silk, stockinet, stroud, stuff, suiting, surah, surat, swan's-down, swanskin, swiss muslin, tabaret, tabby, taffeta, tammy, tarlatan, tarpaulin, tartan, tattersall, terry, Terylene (trademark), tick, ticking, tiffany, toile, towelling, tricot, tricotine, tulle, tussore, tusser, or (chiefly U.S.) tussah, tweed, twill, velours, velure, velvet, velveteen, Viyella (trademark), voile, wadmal, webbing, whipcord, wild silk, winceyette, wool, worsted

fabric

noun
A distinctive, complex underlying pattern or structure:
Translations
قُماشنَسيج
látkatkanina
stofstruktursystemtekstil
kangaskehikkokudosrakennetekstiili
tkanina
anyaganyagszerkezetszerkezetszövésszövet
vefnaîur, dúkur; efni
織物
직물
audumsdrēbe
tkanina
tyg
ผ้าหรือสิ่งทอ
vải

fabric

[ˈfæbrɪk]
A. N
1. (= cloth) → tela f, tejido m; (gen) (= textiles) → tejidos mpl
2. (Archit) → estructura f
the upkeep of the fabricel mantenimiento (estructural) de los edificios
3. (fig) the fabric of societyel tejido social, la estructura de la sociedad
the fabric of Church and Statelos fundamentos de la Iglesia y del Estado
B. CPD fabric conditioner, fabric softener Nsuavizante m
fabric ribbon N (for typewriter) → cinta f de tela

fabric

[ˈfæbrɪk]
n
(= material) → tissu m
cotton fabric → cotonnade f
(= basic structure) [system, society, country] → bases fpl; [one's life] → bases fpl
the fabric of society → le tissu social
[building] → structure f
modif
fabric-covered [box] → recouvert(e) de tissu; [button] → recouvert(e) de tissu fabric ribbon

fabric

n
(Tex) → Stoff m
(= basic structure: of building) → Bausubstanz f
(fig: of society etc) → Gefüge nt, → Struktur f

fabric

[ˈfæbrɪk] n
a. (cloth) → stoffa, tessuto
b. (Archit) → struttura
the fabric of society (fig) → la struttura della società

fabric

(ˈfӕbrik) noun
(a type of) cloth or material. Nylon is a man-made fabric.

fabric

قُماش látka stof Stoff ύφασμα tejido kangas tissu tkanina tessuto 織物 직물 stof stoff tkanina tecido материя tyg ผ้าหรือสิ่งทอ kumaş vải 织品
References in classic literature ?
Forbidden to stir even a hand, and almost afraid to breath, lest they should expose the frail fabric to the fury of the stream, the passengers watched the glancing waters in feverish suspense.
I had been used to chromos for years, and I saw now that without my suspecting it a passion for art had got worked into the fabric of my being, and was become a part of me.
The tints remained during several minutes--fitting, changing, melting into each other; paling almost away for a moment, then reflushing--a shifting, restless, unstable succession of soft opaline gleams, shimmering over that air film of white cloud, and turning it into a fabric dainty enough to clothe an angel with.
A crimson velvet robe, and a shawl turban of some gold-wrought Indian fabric, invested her (I suppose she thought) with a truly imperial dignity.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly.
Listen to these horrid sounds,'' for the din of the recommenced assault and defence now rung fearfully loud from the battlements of the castle; ``in that war-cry is the downfall of thy house The blood-cemented fabric of Front-de-B
The fabric of the Declaration and that of the Confederation were each consistent with its own foundation, but they could not form one consistent, symmetrical edifice.
Resolved: that the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend, and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any State or Territory, no matter under what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.
His fancy grew full of what he used to read about in his books, enchantments, quarrels, battles, challenges, wounds, wooings, loves, agonies, and all sorts of impossible nonsense; and it so possessed his mind that the whole fabric of invention and fancy he read of was true, that to him no history in the world had more reality in it.
I placed my hand upon the solid fabric of the catacombs, and felt satisfied.
Beyond this indication of extensive decay, however, the fabric gave little token of instability.
It is part of the martyrdom which I endure for the cause of the Truth that there are seasons of mental weakness, when Cubes and Spheres flit away into the background of scarce-possible existences; when the Land of Three Dimensions seems almost as visionary as the Land of One or None; nay, when even this hard wall that bars me from my freedom, these very tablets on which I am writing, and all the substantial realities of Flatland itself, appear no better than the offspring of a diseased imagination, or the baseless fabric of a dream.