fabulate

(redirected from fabulating)

fab·u·late

 (făb′yə-lāt′)
intr.v. fab·u·lat·ed, fab·u·lat·ing, fab·u·lates
To engage in the composition of fables or stories, especially those featuring a strong element of fantasy: "a land which ... had given itself up to dreaming, to fabulating, to tale-telling" (Lawrence Durrell).

[Latin fābulārī, fābulāt-, to talk, from fābula, tale, talk; see fable.]

fab′u·la′tion n.
fab′u·la′tor n.

fabulate

(ˈfæbjʊˌleɪt)
vb
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) to invent (fables or stories)
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References in periodicals archive ?
From their perspective, clever Odysseus is a fool in that the fabulating hero refuses to recognize his own shadow, the repressed "other" inside his unconscious.
However, consciousness representations three to five also seem to feature other indications of the narrator's fabulating presence.
Fabulating beauty; perspectives on the fiction of Peter Carey.
Stripping his images of fashion and pop references, the photographer addresses the realities of political violence without letting go of the fabulous and fabulating possibilities of his medium.
Hence, from a panoramic opening on a country between 1925 and 1933, the plot folds back upon itself to relate a scandal in Lukones following the hiring of the veteran Pedro Mahagones, a story about lightning, the rise and death of the poet Carlo Caconcelles, a number of episodes about Gonzalo Pirobutirro's life told by the fabulating community of Jose, La Battistina, la Peppa, and others, Gonzalo's and Elisabetta's pathos, the mysterious attack on the latter, the poem "Autunno," and more.
Rikki Ducornet's fiction is many things: wonderfully detailed and encyclopedic depictions of fabulous imaginary worlds; vivid and often hilarious portraits of malice, depravity, and evil in the tradition of Bosch or Brueghel; allegories about mankind's fear of transmutation, chaos, and death and the devastation and misery these fears engender; meditations about the mysteries of sex, time, and consciousness; ecological and political parables about the twentieth century's predilection for war and mass extinction; metafictional investigations about the perils and attractions of fabulating, creating, and remembering.