façade

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Related to facade: façade

fa·çade

also fa·cade  (fə-säd′)
n.
1. The face of a building, especially the principal face.
2. An artificial or deceptive front: ideological slogans that were a façade for power struggles.

[French, from Italian facciata, from faccia, face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

façade

(fəˈsɑːd; fæ-) or

facade

n
1. (Architecture) the face of a building, esp the main front
2. a front or outer appearance, esp a deceptive one
[C17: from French, from Italian facciata, from faccia face]

fa•cade

art at faceplate

or fa•çade

(fəˈsɑd, fæ-)

n.
1.
a. the front of a building, esp. an imposing or decorative one.
b. any side of a building facing a public way or space and finished accordingly.
2. a superficial appearance of something.
[1650–60; < French < Upper Italian faciada, Italian facciata, derivative of faccia face]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.façade - the face or front of a buildingfacade - the face or front of a building  
front - the side that is seen or that goes first
frontispiece - an ornamental facade
2.facade - a showy misrepresentation intended to conceal something unpleasant
deception, misrepresentation, deceit - a misleading falsehood

façade

noun
1. front, face, exterior, frontage the façade of the building
2. show, front, appearance, mask, exterior, guise, pretence, veneer, semblance They hid the troubles plaguing their marriage behind a façade of family togetherness.

façade

also facade
noun
1. The forward outer surface of a building:
Architecture: frontispiece.
Translations
مَظْهَر خَدّاعواجِهَة مَبْنى
фасада
fasádaprůčelítvářnostvzhled
facadefrontydre
épülethomlokzatkülszín
外観正面
faţadă
pozlátka
cephesahte görünüşyüz

façade

[fəˈsɑːd] N (Archit) → fachada f (fig) → apariencia f

facade

façade [fəˈsɑːd] n
(= frontage) [building] → façade f
(= show, semblance) → façade f
a facade of unity → une façade unitaire

façade

n (lit, fig)Fassade f

façade

facade [fəˈsɑːd] n (Archit) → facciata (fig) → facciata, apparenza

façade

(fəˈsaːd) noun
1. the front of a building. the façade of the temple.
2. a pretended show. In spite of his bold façade, he was very frightened.
References in classic literature ?
I like Thornfield, its antiquity, its retirement, its old crow-trees and thorn-trees, its grey facade, and lines of dark windows reflecting that metal welkin: and yet how long have I abhorred the very thought of it, shunned it like a great plague-house?
It was an apparition from that hidden life which lies, like a dark by-street, behind the goodly ornamented facade that meets the sunlight and the gaze of respectable admirers.
L'esquif aborde et me depose, Jetant son amarre au pilier, Devant une facade rose, Sur le marbre d'un escalier.
After following this path some way toward the main road to Paris, they came to another iron gate which led to the principal facade of the mysterious dwelling.
It was larger than the largest of the palaces or ruins I knew, and the facade had an Oriental look: the face of it having the lustre, as well as the pale-green tint, a kind of bluish-green, of a certain type of Chinese porcelain.
My brother noticed a pale grey smoke or haze rising among the houses in front of them, and veiling the white facade of a terrace beyond the road that appeared between the backs of the villas.
The balls might be heard peppering the facade of the Palais Royal, and one of them, passing under D'Artagnan's arm, entered and broke a mirror, in which Porthos was complacently admiring himself.
Newman thought it a queer way for rich people to live; his ideal of grandeur was a splendid facade diffusing its brilliancy outward too, irradiating hospitality.
For some reason it looked a very artificial lake; indeed, the whole scene was like a classical landscape with a touch of Watteau; the Palladian facade of the house pale in the moon, and the same silver touching the very pagan and naked marble nymph in the middle of the pond.
A shout seemed to shake the very facade of mansions and two stones flew, one breaking a window above the balcony.
But it gave them strength to drift into another Piazza, large and dusty, on the farther side of which rose a black-and-white facade of surpassing ugliness.
Thence the conductor ran straight to earth in an angle of the facade.