face the music


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face

 (fās)
n.
1.
a. The surface of the front of the head from the top of the forehead to the base of the chin and from ear to ear.
b. A person: We saw many new faces on the first day of classes.
2. A person's countenance: a happy face.
3. A contorted facial expression; a grimace: made a face at the prospect of eating lemons.
4.
a. A countenance of a certain complexion or form. Used in combination: babyface; frogface.
b. A person having such a countenance. Used in combination: paleface.
5.
a. Facial makeup: put one's face on.
b. Facial makeup of a certain color, usually worn for the purpose of impersonating or mocking people of a particular racial or ethnic group. Used in combination: applied blackface.
c. Assumed characteristics, such as clothing or behavior, intended to impersonate or mock people of a particular racial or ethnic group. Used in combination: dressing up in yellowface.
6. Outward appearance: the modern face of the city.
7.
a. Value or standing in the eyes of others; prestige: did their best to save face after they were shown to be wrong; did not want to lose face by being unable to live up to his reputation.
b. Self-assurance; confidence: The team managed to maintain a firm face even in times of great adversity.
8. Effrontery; impudence: had the face to question my judgment.
9. The most significant or prominent surface of an object, especially:
a. The surface presented to view; the front.
b. A façade.
c. Outer surface: the face of the earth.
d. A marked side: the face of a clock; the face of a playing card.
e. The right side, as of fabric.
f. An exposed, often precipitous surface of rock.
10. A planar surface of a geometric solid.
11. Any of the surfaces of a rock or crystal.
12. The end, as of a mine or tunnel, at which work is advancing.
13. The appearance and geologic surface features of an area of land; topography.
14. Printing
a. A typeface or range of typefaces.
b. The raised printing surface of a piece of type.
v. faced, fac·ing, fac·es
v.tr.
1. To occupy a position with the face toward: stood and faced the audience.
2. To front on: a window that faces the south.
3.
a. To meet or confront with self-assurance: How can I face your parents when they know that I've let them down?
b. To acknowledge and accept or deal with: had to face the facts; must be willing to face our problems. See Synonyms at defy.
4.
a. To be certain to encounter; have in store: An unskilled youth faces a difficult life.
b. To bring or to be brought face to face with: "The prospect of military conflict ... faced us with nightmarish choices" (Henry A. Kissinger).
5. To cause (troops) to change direction by giving a command.
6. Games To turn (a playing card) so that the face is up.
7. To furnish with a surface or cover of a different material: bronze that is faced with gold foil.
8. To line or trim the edge of, especially with contrasting material: face a hem with lace.
9. To treat the surface of so as to smooth.
v.intr.
1. To be turned or placed with the front toward a specified direction.
2. To turn the face in a specified direction.
Phrasal Verbs:
face down
To attain mastery over or overcome by confronting in a resolute, determined manner: face down an opponent in a debate; faced the enemy down.
face off
1. Sports To stand opposite an opponent in ice hockey, lacrosse, and other games and attempt to gain control of a puck or ball released by an official at the start of play.
2. To compete: Two longtime opponents faced off in a bitter election.
face up
To confront an unpleasant situation with resolution and assurance: had to face up or get out; finally faced up to the problem.
Idioms:
face the music
To accept the unpleasant consequences, especially of one's own actions.
in the face/teeth of
In opposition to or defiance of.
on the face of it
From appearances alone; apparently: On the face of it, the problem seems minor.
show (one's) face
To make an appearance: Don't show your face on my property again.
to (one's) face
In the view or hearing of: insulted me to my face.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

face′a·ble adj.

face the music

To face up to a punishment or ordeal; from military punishments in which defaulters were punished on a parade during which drums were beating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.face the music - accept the unpleasant consequences of one's actions
assume, take over, accept, bear - take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person; "I'll accept the charges"; "She agreed to bear the responsibility"
Translations
nést následky
taka afleiîingum gerîa sinna
niesť následky
cezasını kabullenmek

face

(feis) noun
1. the front part of the head, from forehead to chin. a beautiful face.
2. a surface especially the front surface. a rock face.
3. in mining, the end of a tunnel etc where work is being done. a coal face.
verb
1. to be opposite to. My house faces the park.
2. to turn, stand etc in the direction of. She faced him across the desk.
3. to meet or accept boldly. to face one's fate.
-faced adjective
having a face of a certain kind. a baby-faced man.
facial (ˈfeiʃəl) adjective
of the face. facial expressions.
facing preposition
opposite. The hotel is facing the church.
facecloth noun
(American washcloth) a piece of cloth for washing the face or body.
ˈfacelift noun
1. an operation to smooth and firm the face. She has had a facelift.
2. a process intended to make a building etc look better. This village will be given a facelift.
ˈface-powder noun
a type of make-up in the form of a fine powder. She put on face-powder to stop her nose shining.
ˈface-saving adjective
of something which helps a person not to look stupid or not to appear to be giving in. He agreed to everything we asked and as a face-saving exercise we offered to consult him occasionally.
face value
the value stated on the face of a coin etc. Some old coins are now worth a great deal more than their face value.
at face value
as being as valuable etc as it appears. You must take this offer at face value.
face the music
to accept punishment or responsibility for something one has done. The child had to face the music after being rude to the teacher.
face to face
in person; in the actual presence of one another. I'd like to meet him face to face some day – I've heard so much about him.
face up to
to meet or accept boldly. She faced up to her difficult situation.
in the face of
having to deal with and in spite of. She succeeded in the face of great difficulties.
lose face
to suffer a loss of respect or reputation. You will really lose face if you are defeated.
make/pull a face
to twist one's face into a strange expression. She pulled faces at the baby to make it laugh.
on the face of it
as it appears at first glance, usually deceptively. On the face of it, the problem was easy.
put a good face on it
to give the appearance of being satisfied etc with something when one is not. Now it's done we'll have to put a good face on it.
save one's face
to avoid appearing stupid or wrong. I refuse to accept the reponsibility for that error just to save your face – it's your fault.
References in classic literature ?
They do face the music, and they do stick by each other in private life
If I don't," whispered Raffles, as he wormed through the window feet foremost, "I'm afraid you'll have to face the music where you are, and I shall have the best of it down in Acheron
Do you think I would leave her alone to face the music while I slunk away.
In a press briefing at the NBI headquarters, Tatad said she has nothing to hide and that she is ready to face the music.
LAHORE -- Deputy Inspector General of Police, Dr Ashraf Haider has said that strict security arrangements have been made for Shab-e-Baraat in the provincial capital and those found involved in sabotaging the peace of the city would have to face the music.
But the caretaker coach will face the music if the Germans flop again at Group D leaders Juventus - and are left facing an early exit.
Recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the E Street Band, he released Face the Music back in August 2014.
MICK MARTIN has revealed he used to face the music as Newcastle United skipper and do what some players deem the unthinkable - brave a Saturday night in the Bigg Market after a defeat at St James' Park.
The duo have had a week to learn a routine, performing to a medley of tunes including Let's Face The Music And Dance, which was the accompaniment to their bronze-winning performance at the 1994 Winter Olympics.
NADINE DORRIES declared "I'd do it again tomorrow" after arriving back in Britain yesterday to face the music following her appearance on I'm A Celebrity.
When the buddies return to HQ to face the music, ladies' man FDR decides to lighten the mood by helping shy and gallant Tuck dip his toes back into the dating pool.