face to face


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face-to-face

(fās′tə-fās′)
adj.
Being in the presence of another; facing: a face-to-face discussion.
adv. also face to face
In person; directly: would rather talk face-to-face than negotiate over the telephone.

face to face

adv, adj (face-to-face as adjective)
1. opposite one another
2. in confrontation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.face to face - involving close contact; confronting each other; "the boy and the policeman suddenly came face-to-face at the corner"; "they spoke face to face"
Translations
وَجهاً لِوَجْه
tváří v tvář
személyesen
augliti til auglitis
oog in oog
tvárou v tvár
yüzyüze

face

(feis) noun
1. the front part of the head, from forehead to chin. a beautiful face.
2. a surface especially the front surface. a rock face.
3. in mining, the end of a tunnel etc where work is being done. a coal face.
verb
1. to be opposite to. My house faces the park.
2. to turn, stand etc in the direction of. She faced him across the desk.
3. to meet or accept boldly. to face one's fate.
-faced adjective
having a face of a certain kind. a baby-faced man.
facial (ˈfeiʃəl) adjective
of the face. facial expressions.
facing preposition
opposite. The hotel is facing the church.
facecloth noun
(American washcloth) a piece of cloth for washing the face or body.
ˈfacelift noun
1. an operation to smooth and firm the face. She has had a facelift.
2. a process intended to make a building etc look better. This village will be given a facelift.
ˈface-powder noun
a type of make-up in the form of a fine powder. She put on face-powder to stop her nose shining.
ˈface-saving adjective
of something which helps a person not to look stupid or not to appear to be giving in. He agreed to everything we asked and as a face-saving exercise we offered to consult him occasionally.
face value
the value stated on the face of a coin etc. Some old coins are now worth a great deal more than their face value.
at face value
as being as valuable etc as it appears. You must take this offer at face value.
face the music
to accept punishment or responsibility for something one has done. The child had to face the music after being rude to the teacher.
face to face
in person; in the actual presence of one another. I'd like to meet him face to face some day – I've heard so much about him.
face up to
to meet or accept boldly. She faced up to her difficult situation.
in the face of
having to deal with and in spite of. She succeeded in the face of great difficulties.
lose face
to suffer a loss of respect or reputation. You will really lose face if you are defeated.
make/pull a face
to twist one's face into a strange expression. She pulled faces at the baby to make it laugh.
on the face of it
as it appears at first glance, usually deceptively. On the face of it, the problem was easy.
put a good face on it
to give the appearance of being satisfied etc with something when one is not. Now it's done we'll have to put a good face on it.
save one's face
to avoid appearing stupid or wrong. I refuse to accept the reponsibility for that error just to save your face – it's your fault.
References in classic literature ?
Prest, and we stood face to face in the empty pompous hall.
Now, though his conviction that jealousy was a shameful feeling and that one ought to feel confidence, had not broken down, he felt that he was standing face to face with something illogical and irrational, and did not know what was to be done.
The impression became at last so poignant that I asked myself if it would not be better to go to the Captain's room, see him face to face, and brave him with look and gesture.
Don't you feel how splendid it is that a young man and a young woman should be able to talk face to face as we have talked?
what should be leaving my room, as I advanced to enter it, but--well, it's no use, resolutions are all very well, but facts are facts, especially when they're natural, and here was I face to face with the most natural little natural fact, and withal the most charming and merry-eyed, that-- well, in short, as I came to enter my room I was confronted by the roundest, ruddiest little chambermaid ever created for the trial of mortal frailty.
Her talk about these things simply emparadised me; it lifted me into a heaven of hope that I, too, might some day meet such elect spirits and converse with them face to face.
And when I talked face to face with my wild Wisdom, she said to me angrily: "Thou willest, thou cravest, thou lovest; on that account alone dost thou PRAISE Life
What mortal men would have dared to meet him face to face save Heracles and glorious Iolaus?
What a cruel practical joke old Nature played when she flung so many contradictory elements together, and left the man face to face with the perplexing callousness of the universe.
Jim hastened his lagging steps at this assurance of a quick relief from the dark passage, and in a few moments more they had emerged from the mountain and found themselves face to face with a new and charming country.
He decided to manufacture the form of a man, who would wear this pumpkin head, and to stand it in a place where old Mombi would meet it face to face.
The episode meant more to him than being bested in play by the best swordsman in England--for that surely was no disgrace--to Henry it seemed prophetic of the outcome of a future struggle when he should stand face to face with the real De Montfort; and then, seeing in De Vac only the creature of his imagination with which he had vested the likeness of his powerful brother-in-law, Henry did what he should like to have done to the real Leicester.