Bell’s palsy

(redirected from facial nerve palsy)
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Translations

Bell’s palsy

n (Med) → bellsche Lähmung
References in periodicals archive ?
Examination also detected right facial nerve palsy (House-Brackmann grade V).
vivax malaria causing cerebral malaria and other neurological deficits like bilateral facial nerve palsy (6-7).
The form also states that in a letter from the health board's solicitors on June 20 this year, a breach of duty was admitted in terms that Caitlin's seventh nerve was damaged during the operation and that this led to the right facial nerve palsy.
Only 5% of sarcoidosis cases have neurologic involvement, with the most common manifestation being facial nerve palsy (3-6).
In our case of Garcin's Syndrome the patient presented with a facial nerve palsy and an accurate diagnosis of non-Hodgkins Lymphoma at this stage may have prevented the development of this syndrome.
Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare but recognised complication of seroconversion, the process by which the HIV virus becomes widespread throughout the body.
Finally, this report demonstrates an extremely rare case of crossed hemiplegia with oculomotor and facial nerve palsy due to an infarct in the upper part of the midbrain as documented by the MRI scan.
The second element of the triad, peripheral facial nerve palsy, is seen in 30% to 90% of the patients with MRS that cannot be differentiated from Bell's paralysis; our patient also had experienced it about 20 years ago (10).
You diagnose facial nerve paralysis and wonder about the evidence supporting the use of steroids and antivirals for improving outcomes in facial nerve palsy.
Seven months after presentation, the patient developed diplopia, left hemiparesis, left 3rd cranial nerve palsy, left facial nerve palsy, and memory loss.
The study found no significant difference in more serious birth trauma, which included skull and clavicle fracture, intracranial hemorrhage, facial nerve palsy, and Erb's palsy (1.
E-Teams products to be displayed at "Building Bionic Bodies" include: * From Dartmouth College, a headset that uses "feedforward technology" and Active Noise Reduction (ANR) to reduce the effects of dangerous noise levels in the workplace * From Brown University, a smart alarm clock that electronically monitors a user's eye movements to distinguish various sleep stages, sounding the alarm only during the lightest stage of sleep * From the University of Pittsburg, a prosthetic device to facilitate blinking in patients suffering from facial nerve palsy