factor cost

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factor cost

n
(Economics) (in social accounting) valuation of goods and services at their overall commercial cost, including markups but excluding indirect taxes and subsidies
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However, policy-oriented, technological innovation, factor costs and markets indicators are the four sub-systems of SMEs in Shangai.
Voting in X Factor costs 35p for mobile and BT landline votes.
He mentioned that the company has so far been absorbing the impact of increased factor costs without burdening its customers.
The study includes a technological economic feasibility study for setting up a cotton yarn spinning mill based on the factor costs prevailing in the eleven sub Saharan African countries.
Released August 11 as part of the Concrete Sustainability Hub's 2011 Industry Day on the MIT Cambridge campus, the studies factor costs and embodied carbon dioxide levels at initial construction plus those of use and operations phases--based on energy consumption, maintenance and traffic delays--not fully accounted for in most LCAs.
now comes shades of and blue or combine Metallics on the John Galliano spring/summer 2011 catwalk, by Max Factor Costs uk eyes right Bobbi Brown's Metallic Long-Wear Cream Shadow, pounds 16, now comes infused with glistening sparkle.
Selecting four key international corridors in West, Central, East, and Southern Africa that connect ports of entry and exit to the hinterland, the study analyzes such factors as road network quality and coverage; factor costs such as fuel, labor, and equipment; market economics, including regulation, companies' organization, and transport and trade procedures and their impacts on transport prices and tariffs incurred by end users; transport costs incurred by commercial transport providers; and vehicle operating costs.
This has allowed firms to take advantage of differences in factor costs and expertise across countries.
Because demand is diminishing and factor costs are high, no incentive exists to make the investments needed to put the facility costs back into the second phase or certainly into the first phase.
This issue is addressed in calculating adjusted factor costs for the Soviet economy.
Due to the intuitive appeal of these theories, governments have implemented various policies designed to improve comparative advantage in factor costs by ,educing interest rates and resorting to devaluation, special depreciation allowances, export financing, etc.
The relevance of this point is that this simple relationship, derived from a first-order condition facing the individual firm, can be re-expressed as a mark-up pricing equation, which states that price is a mark-up over unit factor costs for any factor [Hymans 309-24].