faculty


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Related to faculty: Faculty of Law

fac·ul·ty

 (făk′əl-tē)
n. pl. fac·ul·ties
1.
a. An inherent power or ability: the faculty of speech.
b. A talent or natural ability for something: has a wonderful faculty for storytelling.
2.
a. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The teachers and instructors of a school or college, or of one of its divisions, especially those considered permanent, full-time employees.
b. One of the divisions of a college or university: the faculty of law.
c. All of the members of a learned profession: the medical faculty.
3. Authorization granted by authority; conferred power.
4. Archaic An occupation; a trade.

[Middle English faculte, from Old French, from Latin facultās, power, ability, from facilis, easy; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

faculty

(ˈfækəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. one of the inherent powers of the mind or body, such as reason, memory, sight, or hearing
2. any ability or power, whether acquired or inherent
3. a conferred power or right
4. (Education)
a. a department within a university or college devoted to a particular branch of knowledge
b. the staff of such a department
c. chiefly US and Canadian all the teaching staff at a university, college, school, etc
5. (Education) all members of a learned profession
6. archaic occupation
[C14 (in the sense: department of learning): from Latin facultās capability; related to Latin facilis easy]

fac•ul•ty

(ˈfæk əl ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. an ability, natural or acquired, for a particular kind of action.
2. one of the powers of the mind, as memory, reason, or speech.
3. an inherent capability of the body.
4.
a. the entire teaching and administrative force of a university, college, or school.
b. one of the departments of learning, as theology, medicine, or law, in a university.
5. the members of a learned profession.
6. a power or privilege conferred by the state, a superior, etc.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French < Latin facultās ability, power]
syn: See ability.

Faculty

 members of a particular profession regarded as a body; a group of persons entrusted with the government and tuition in a college or university.
Examples: faculty of advocates, 1711; of physicians and surgeons, 1511.

faculty

Any of the distinct branches of teaching at a college or university, or the body of teachers in a particular subject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.faculty - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mindfaculty - one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
attention - the faculty or power of mental concentration; "keeping track of all the details requires your complete attention"
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
retentiveness, retentivity, retention, memory - the power of retaining and recalling past experience; "he had a good memory when he was younger"
intellect, reason, understanding - the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination; "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil"
sensory faculty, sentiency, sentience, sense, sensation - the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; "in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"
volition, will - the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention; "the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt"- George Meredith
2.faculty - the body of teachers and administrators at a schoolfaculty - the body of teachers and administrators at a school; "the dean addressed the letter to the entire staff of the university"
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
school - an educational institution; "the school was founded in 1900"
prof, professor - someone who is a member of the faculty at a college or university

faculty

noun
1. power, ability, capacity, capability, potential the severed head still retains the faculty of feeling and thinking during several seconds
2. ability, power, skill, facility, talent, gift, capacity, bent, capability, readiness, knack, propensity, aptitude, dexterity, cleverness, adroitness, turn A faculty for self-preservation is necessary when you have friends like hers.
ability failing, weakness, inability, shortcoming, weak point, unskilfulness
3. department, school, discipline, profession, branch of learning the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences
4. teaching staff, staff, teachers, professors, lecturers (chiefly U.S.) The faculty agreed on a change in the requirements
plural noun
1. powers, reason, senses, intelligence, wits, capabilities, mental abilities, physical abilities He was drunk and not in control of his faculties.

faculty

noun
1. An innate capability:
2. Physical, mental, financial, or legal power to perform:
3. Conferred power:
Translations
قُدْرَه، قُوَّهكُلِّيَّـهمَقْدِرَه، مَهارَهمَلَكَه، اسْتِعْداد طَبيعي
fakultaschopnosttalent
anlægevnefakultetsans
fakultás
deildhæfileikihæfileiki, gáfa
fakultetasgamtos dovanamokėjimas
fakultāteprasmespēja
doğal yetenekfakülteyetenekzihinsel yetenek

faculty

[ˈfækəltɪ] N
1. (= power of body, mind) → facultad f
to have or be in possession of all one's facultiesestar en pleno uso de sus facultades
2. (= ability) → aptitud f, facilidad f
to have a faculty for sth/doing sthtener aptitud or facilidad para algo/hacer algo
3. (Univ) → facultad f (esp US) (Univ) (= teaching staff) → profesorado m (de facultad or universidad)

faculty

[ˈfækəlti] n
(= physical or mental ability) → faculté f
critical faculties → sens m critique
the faculty of hearing → la faculté auditive, l'ouïe f
(British) (= group of university departments) → faculté f
medical faculty, faculty of medicine → faculté f de médecine
(British) (= staff of university departments) → corps m enseignant
(US) (= teaching staff of university) → corps m enseignant

faculty

n
(= power of mind)Vermögen nt, → Fähigkeit f, → Kraft f; (= ability, aptitude)Begabung f, → Talent nt; mental facultiesgeistige Fähigkeiten pl, → Geisteskräfte pl; faculty of reasonVernunft f; faculty of hearing/sightHör-/Sehvermögen nt; to be in (full) possession of (all) one’s facultiesim Vollbesitz seiner Kräfte sein; to have a faculty for doing somethingein Talent dafür haben, etw zu tun
(Univ) → Fakultät f; the medical faculty, the faculty of medicinedie medizinische Fakultät; the Faculty (= staff)der Lehrkörper
(Eccl) → Vollmacht f

faculty

[ˈfækltɪ] nfacoltà f inv (Am) (teaching staff) → corpo insegnante

faculty

(ˈfӕkəlti) plural ˈfaculties noun
1. a power of the mind. the faculty of reason.
2. a natural power of the body. the faculty of hearing.
3. ability or skill. She has a faculty for saying the right thing.
4. (often with capital) a section of a university. the Faculty of Arts/Science.

fac·ul·ty

n. facultad.
1. cuerpo facultativo;
2. aptitud o habilidad para llevar a cabo funciones normales.

faculty

n (pl -ties) facultad f
References in classic literature ?
He studied French and went to an art school, hoping to develop a faculty he had for drawing.
You know Professor Bumper spoke of a rival--a man named Beecher who is a member of the faculty of a new and wealthy college.
She was like someone in whom the faculty of becoming interested is worn out.
The needs of the present absorbed her every faculty.
For several minutes Munro paced the chamber with long and rapid strides, his rigid features working convulsively, and every faculty seemingly absorbed in the musings of his own mind.
Some said that he could look into people's minds; others, that, by the marvellous power of this eye, he could draw people into his own mind, or send them, if he pleased, to do errands to his grandfather, in the spiritual world; others, again, that it was what is termed an Evil Eye, and possessed the valuable faculty of blighting corn, and drying children into mummies with the heartburn.
His gifts were emphatically those of a man of business; prompt, acute, clear-minded; with an eye that saw through all perplexities, and a faculty of arrangement that made them vanish as by the waving of an enchanter's wand.
They had shown me from the first a facility for everything, a general faculty which, taking a fresh start, achieved remarkable flights.
The pace they set here, it was one that called for every faculty of a man--from the instant the first steer fell till the sounding of the noon whistle, and again from half-past twelve till heaven only knew what hour in the late afternoon or evening, there was never one instant's rest for a man, for his hand or his eye or his brain.
I close-reefed my ears-- that is to say, I bent the flaps of them down and furled them into five or six folds, and pressed them against the hearing-orifice--but it did no good: the faculty was so sharpened by nervous excitement that it was become a microphone and could hear through the overlays without trouble.
It is not possible to blink the truth that Emma Jane was dull; but a dogged, unswerving loyalty, and the gift of devoted, unselfish loving, these, after all, are talents of a sort, and may possibly be of as much value in the world as a sense of numbers or a faculty for languages.
It has a natural, an inevitable tendency to brutalize every noble faculty of man.

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