fade out


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fade

 (fād)
v. fad·ed, fad·ing, fades
v.intr.
1. To lose brightness, loudness, or brilliance gradually: The lights and music faded as we set sail from the harbor.
2. To lose freshness; wither: summer flowers that had faded.
3. To lose strength or vitality; wane: youthful energy that had faded over the years.
4. To disappear gradually; vanish: a hope that faded. See Synonyms at disappear.
5. Sports To swerve from a straight course, especially in the direction of a slice.
6. Football To move back from the line of scrimmage. Used of a quarterback.
v.tr.
1. To cause to lose brightness, freshness, or strength: Exposure to sunlight has faded the carpet.
2. Sports To hit (a golf ball, for instance) with a moderate, usually controlled slice.
3. Games To meet the bet of (an opposing player) in dice.
n.
1. The act of fading.
2. A gradual dimming or increase in the brightness or loudness of a light source or audio signal.
3. A transition in a cinematic work or slide presentation in which the image gradually appears on or disappears from a blank screen.
4. Sports A moderate, usually controlled slice, as in golf.
5. A control mechanism on a stereo that adjusts the distribution of power between the front and rear channels.
6. A style of haircut in which the hair is cut close to the sides and back of the head and trimmed to result in gradually longer lengths toward the top of the head.
Phrasal Verbs:
fade in
To appear or cause to appear gradually from silence or darkness, especially as a transition in a cinematic work, audio recording, or performance.
fade out
To diminish gradually to silence or darkness, especially as a transition in a cinematic work, audio recording, or performance.

[Middle English faden, from Old French fader, from fade, faded, probably from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, alteration of Latin fatuus, insipid.]

fade out

The opposite of fade in, in which the image gradually fades away into darkness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.fade out - become weaker; "The sound faded out"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"
dissolve - cause to fade away; "dissolve a shot or a picture"

fade

verb
1. To become inaudible:
die (away, out, or down), fade out.
2. To lose strength or power:
Informal: fizzle (out).
3. To disappear gradually by or as if by dispersal of particles:
dissolve, melt (away).
4. To pass out of sight either gradually or suddenly:
phrasal verb
fade out
1. To pass out of sight either gradually or suddenly:
2. To become inaudible:
die (away, out, or down), fade.
3. To make (a film image) disappear gradually:
noun
A gradual disappearance, especially of a film image:
Translations
häivyttäähäivytys

w>fade out

vi
(Rad, TV, Film) → abblenden
to fade out of somebody’s lifeaus jds Leben verschwinden
vt sep (Rad, TV, Film) → abblenden
References in classic literature ?
With the first full puff of the smoke he gave over his moans and yelps, the agitation began to fade out of him, and Daughtry, appreciatively waiting, saw the trembling go out of his hands, the pendulous lip-quivering cease, the saliva stop flowing from the corners of his mouth, and placidity come into the fiery remnants of his eyes.
The ground was desperate that day and it turned into a real slog, so it was no surprise to see Tom Fruit fade out of it towards the finish against some race-fit rivals.
It seems that the first composer to fade out a piece of music was Johann Strauss in 1848.