fade-in


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fade-in

or fade·in (fād′ĭn′)
n.
A gradual appearance of an image, light, or sound, especially as a transition in a cinematic work, audio recording, or performance.

fade-in

n
1. (Film) films an optical effect in which a shot appears gradually out of darkness
2. (Telecommunications) a gradual increase in the volume in a radio or television broadcast
vb (adverb)
(Telecommunications) Also: fade up to increase or cause to increase gradually, as vision or sound in a film or broadcast

fade′-in`



n.
1. a gradual increase in the visibility of a film or television scene.
2. a gradual increase in the volume of broadcast or recorded sound.
[1915–20]
Translations

fade-in

[ˈfeɪdɪn] N (Cine, TV) → (entrada f en) fundido m

fade-in

[ˈfeɪdˌɪn] n (Cine) → dissolvenza in apertura (Radio) → aumento graduale del suono
References in periodicals archive ?
This removes unwanted empty footage and preserves fade-ins and fade-outs that automated solutions might cut off.
By now, our eyes have become so conditioned by the more jarring interruptions of jump cuts and channel hops that multiple fade-outs and fade-ins seem rather hokey, relegated to "lesser" forms like screen savers and club visuals.
There are no fade-ins or fade-outs in the film to give the players a momentary break.
They even got used to the "fade-outs and fade-ins which seemed to happen for no reason," as Rixon put it.