fain


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Related to fain: malefactions

fain

 (fān) Archaic
adv.
Happily; gladly: "I would fain improve every opportunity to wonder and worship, as a sunflower welcomes the light" (Henry David Thoreau).
adj.
1. Ready; willing.
2. Pleased; happy.
3. Obliged or required.

[Middle English, from Old English fægen, joyful, glad.]

fain

(feɪn)
adv
(usually with would) archaic willingly; gladly: she would fain be dead.
adj
obsolete
a. willing or eager
b. compelled
[Old English fægen; related to Old Norse fegiun happy, Old High German gifehan to be glad, Gothic fahehs joy; see fawn2]

fain

(feɪn)
Archaic. adv.
1. gladly; willingly: He fain would accept.
adj.
2. content; willing.
3. constrained; obliged.
4. glad; pleased.
5. desirous; eager.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English fæg(e)n]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fain - having made preparations; "prepared to take risks"
willing - disposed or inclined toward; "a willing participant"; "willing helpers"
Adv.1.fain - in a willing manner; "this was gladly agreed to"; "I would fain do it"

fain

adjective
Archaic. Disposed to accept or agree:
Translations

fain

(archaic) [feɪn] ADV (used only with "would") → de buena gana

fain

adv (obs) I would fainich möchte
References in classic literature ?
Heyward, who perceived that his superior took a malicious pleasure in exhibiting his contempt for the message of the French general, was fain to humor a spleen that he knew would be short-lived; he therefore, replied with as much indifference as he could assume on such a subject:
She was fain to have recourse to the prospect again to banish these thoughts, and this opened her eyes to the fact that her companions had been missing from the trail ahead of her for some time.
The impression of its actual state, at this distance of a hundred and sixty years, darkens inevitably through the picture which we would fain give of its appearance on the morning when the Puritan magnate bade all the town to be his guests.
A clump of scrubby trees, such as alone grew on the peninsula, did not so much conceal the cottage from view, as seem to denote that here was some object which would fain have been, or at least ought to be, concealed.
Brom, who had a degree of rough chivalry in his nature, would fain have carried matters to open warfare and have settled their pretensions to the lady, according to the mode of those most concise and simple reasoners, the knights-errant of yore, -- by single combat; but lchabod was too conscious of the superior might of his adversary to enter the lists against him; he had overheard a boast of Bones, that he would "double the schoolmaster up, and lay him on a shelf of his own schoolhouse;" and he was too wary to give him an opportunity.
We were fain to button up our monkey jackets, and hold to our lips cups of scalding tea with our half frozen fingers.
As such a man, however, was not of much practical use in the ship, especially as he refused to work except when he pleased, the incredulous captain would fain have been rid of him; but apprised that that individual's intention was to land him in the first convenient port, the archangel forthwith opened all his seals and vials -- devoting the ship and all hands to unconditional perdition, in case this intention was carried out.
At first, Tom used to read a verse or two of his Bible, by the flicker of the fire, after he had returned from his daily toil; but, after the cruel treatment he received, he used to come home so exhausted, that his head swam and his eyes failed when he tried to read; and he was fain to stretch himself down, with the others, in utter exhaustion.
For government is an expedient, by which men would fain succeed in letting one another alone; and, as has been said, when it is most expedient, the governed are most let alone by it.
We have felt that we almost alone hereabouts practiced this noble art; though, to tell the truth, at least if their own assertions are to be received, most of my townsmen would fain walk sometimes, as I do, but they cannot.
I would fain exercise some better faculty than that of fierce speaking; fain find nourishment for some less fiendish feeling than that of sombre indignation.
he resumed, at last - fain, notwithstanding his hardihood, to have a support behind him; for, after the struggle, he trembled, in spite of himself, to his very finger-ends.