fairness doctrine


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fairness doctrine

n.
An obligation formerly imposed by the Federal Communications Commission on broadcasters using the public airwaves to cover issues of public importance and in a manner that allowed those with opposing viewpoints a reasonable opportunity to be heard.
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Justice White, concurring in the judgment but not in Burger's state action discussion, found it "at least arguable" that the Communications Act, the policies of the FCC, and the fairness doctrine were sufficiently implicated by the facts of the case so as to require First Amendment review of the Commissioner's actions.
Cable must-carry rules, like both the Fairness Doctrine and the right-of-reply statute in Tornillo, do not add any information to the system.
The fairness doctrine established "substantial disincentives" that caused broadcasters to cut back their coverage of controversial issues of importance, thereby reducing the diversity of viewpoints reaching the public.
Note that the demise of the Fairness Doctrine led to the ascendancy of conservative talk radio.
Rosenberg said that because of the fairness doctrine our discussion of Al Gore: A User's Manual, written by Jeffrey St.
The rise of the "electronic right" on TV is also the result of the collapse of government oversight (including the 1987 elimination of the Fairness Doctrine, which required stations to air both sides of controversial issues) and the increased power of big money.
3) Second, the Fairness Doctrine was followed by a complete ban on all broadcast advertising of cigarettes beginning January 1971.
Also, the Burger-Rehnquist Courts have ruled that the federal government could prohibit the deposit of leaflets and circulars in the mailboxes of private homes; that the Fairness Doctrine did not have to be extended to include the print media, opening the door to a repudiation of the Fairness Doctrine by a Reagan-appointed FCC; and that the Combined Federal Campaign, which facilitated charitable contributions by federal employees through payroll deductions, could exclude advocacy groups such as the NAACP and the Sierra Club (a decision which was subsequently reversed by congressional action).
House voted 261 to 162 to add the Fairness Doctrine to a pending deficit reduction bill.
WASHINGTON -- The American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), focusing on constitutional law, said today it is preparing a litigation strategy should the Fairness Doctrine - or a similar regulatory measure - be brought back to muzzle Christian broadcasting.
The FCC stopped enforcing the controversial Fairness Doctrine in 1987 and officially took it off the books in 2011.
Only following the demise of the Fairness Doctrine did broadcast licensees employ commentators who communicated unfettered and robust political opinions.