fairyland


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fair·y·land

 (fâr′ē-lănd′)
n.
1. The imaginary land of fairies.
2. A charming, enchanting place.

fairyland

(ˈfɛərɪˌlænd) or

fairydom

n
1. the imaginary domain of the fairies; an enchanted or wonderful place
2. a fantasy world, esp one resulting from a person's wild imaginings

fair•y•land

(ˈfɛər iˌlænd)

n.
1. the imaginary realm of fairies.
2. an enchantingly beautiful region or place.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fairyland - something existing solely in the imagination (but often mistaken for reality)fairyland - something existing solely in the imagination (but often mistaken for reality)
fantasy, phantasy - imagination unrestricted by reality; "a schoolgirl fantasy"
paracosm - a prolonged fantasy world invented by children; can have a definite geography and language and history
2.fairyland - the enchanted realm of fairiesfairyland - the enchanted realm of fairies  
fictitious place, imaginary place, mythical place - a place that exists only in imagination; a place said to exist in fictional or religious writings
Translations
meseországtündérország

fairyland

[ˈfɛərɪlænd] Npaís m de las hadas (fig) → país m de ensueño
he's living in fairylandvive en la luna

fairyland

[ˈfɛərilænd] n
(in fairy stories)royaume m des fées
(= beautiful place) → pays m enchantéfairy lights npl (British)guirlande f électriquefairy story fairy tale, fairytale, fairy-tale n
(lit)conte m de fées
(= untruth) → histoire f à dormir deboutfairy-tale fairytale [ˈfɛəriteɪl] modif [romance] → enchanteur/teresse
a fairy-tale ending → un happy end

fairyland

[ˈfɛərɪˌlænd] npaese m delle fate
References in classic literature ?
In one window there would be live geese, in another marvels in sugar--pink and white canes big enough for ogres, and cakes with cherubs upon them; in a third there would be rows of fat yellow turkeys, decorated with rosettes, and rabbits and squirrels hanging; in a fourth would be a fairyland of toys--lovely dolls with pink dresses, and woolly sheep and drums and soldier hats.
But the weirdest effect, and the most enchanting is that produced by the diffused light of the low afternoon sun; no single ray is able to pierce its way in, then, but the diffused light takes color from moss and foliage, and pervades the place like a faint, greet-tinted mist, the theatrical fire of fairyland.
We loitered along in front of them, and Dora often stopped to admire this one or that one, and I stopped to admire the same one, and Dora, laughing, held the dog up childishly, to smell the flowers; and if we were not all three in Fairyland, certainly I was.
It was simply in the fact that she was an actress,--a real, live, famous actress, whose photographs made shop windows beautiful,--come right out of my boy's fairyland of the theatre, actually to sit eating and drinking, quite in a real way, at my side.
An extraordinary sensation shook Erskine; confused ideas of fairyland ran through his imagination.
There was, no doubt, a certain amount of absurdity in applying this title (which, as of course you see without my telling you, was nothing but 'your Royal Highness' condensed into one syllable) to a small creature whose father was merely the Warden of Outland: still, large excuse must be made for a man who had passed several years at the Court of Fairyland, and had there acquired the almost impossible art of pronouncing five syllables as one.
Vivid orchids and wonderful colored lichens smoldered upon the swarthy tree-trunks and where a wandering shaft of light fell full upon the golden allamanda, the scarlet star-clusters of the tacsonia, or the rich deep blue of ipomaea, the effect was as a dream of fairyland.
Beyond this was the only building in sight, a low conservatory, which seemed far away from anywhere, like a glass cottage standing in its own fields in fairyland.
When Flambeau asked whether this rocky gate of the twisted river was not the gate of Fairyland, he said "Yes.
She had seen Gluck's Armide that year, and played from memory the music of the enchanted garden--the music to which Renaud approaches, beneath the light of an eternal dawn, the music that never gains, never wanes, but ripples for ever like the tideless seas of fairyland.
When we emerged from the little building which houses the upper terminus of the elevator, we found ourselves in the midst of a veritable fairyland of beauty.
The Thames would not be the fairyland it is without its flower-decked locks.