faith


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faith

 (fāth)
n.
1.
a. Belief in God or in a set of religious doctrines.
b. A set of religious doctrines; a body of dogma: adhered to the Muslim faith.
c. often Faith Christianity Secure belief in God and a trusting acceptance of God's will viewed as a theological virtue.
2. Confident or unquestioning belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, idea, or thing. See Synonyms at belief, trust.
3. Loyalty to a person or thing; allegiance: keeping faith with one's supporters; refused to break faith with his friends.
Idiom:
in faith
Indeed; truly.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman fed, from Latin fidēs; see bheidh- in Indo-European roots.]

faith

(feɪθ)
n
1. strong or unshakeable belief in something, esp without proof or evidence
2. a specific system of religious beliefs: the Jewish faith.
3. (Theology) Christianity trust in God and in his actions and promises
4. (Theology) a conviction of the truth of certain doctrines of religion, esp when this is not based on reason
5. complete confidence or trust in a person, remedy, etc
6. any set of firmly held principles or beliefs
7. allegiance or loyalty, as to a person or cause (esp in the phrases keep faith, break faith)
8. bad faith insincerity or dishonesty
9. good faith honesty or sincerity, as of intention in business (esp in the phrase in good faith)
interj
archaic indeed; really (also in the phrases by my faith, in faith)
[C12: from Anglo-French feid, from Latin fidēs trust, confidence]

faith

(feɪθ)

n.
1. confidence or trust in a person or thing.
2. belief that is not based on proof.
3. belief in God or in the doctrines or teachings of religion.
4. belief in anything, as a code of ethics or standards of merit.
5. a system of religious belief: the Jewish faith.
6. the obligation of loyalty or fidelity to a person, promise, engagement, etc.
7. the observance of this obligation; fidelity to one's promise, oath, allegiance, etc.
Idioms:
in faith, in truth; indeed.
[1200–50; Middle English feith < Anglo-French fed, Old French feid, feit < Latin fidem, acc. of fidēs trust, akin to fīdere to trust]

Faith


a reliance, in a search for religious truth, on faith alone. — fideist, n. — fideistic. adj.
referring to or having a pure and genuine faith.
the branch of theology that studies the characteristics of faith.

Faith

 of merchants: company of merchants—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.faith - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destinyfaith - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
persecution - the act of persecuting (especially on the basis of race or religion)
vigil, watch - the rite of staying awake for devotional purposes (especially on the eve of a religious festival)
consecration - (religion) sanctification of something by setting it apart (usually with religious rites) as dedicated to God; "the Cardinal attended the consecration of the church"
chastity, sexual abstention, celibacy - abstaining from sexual relations (as because of religious vows)
toleration - official recognition of the right of individuals to hold dissenting opinions (especially in religion)
traditionalism - adherence to tradition (especially in cultural or religious matters)
censer, thurible - a container for burning incense (especially one that is swung on a chain in a religious ritual)
cloister - a courtyard with covered walks (as in religious institutions)
habit - a distinctive attire worn by a member of a religious order
orthodoxy - the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
supernatural virtue, theological virtue - according to Christian ethics: one of the three virtues (faith, hope, and charity) created by God to round out the natural virtues
netherworld, Scheol, underworld, Hades, infernal region, Hell - (religion) the world of the dead; "No one goes to Hades with all his immense wealth"-Theognis
meditation - (religion) contemplation of spiritual matters (usually on religious or philosophical subjects)
belief - any cognitive content held as true
apophatism - the religious belief that God cannot be known but is completely `other' and must be described in negative terms (in terms of what God is not)
cataphatism - the religious belief that God has given enough clues to be known to humans positively and affirmatively (e.g., God created Adam `in his own image')
doctrine of analogy, analogy - the religious belief that between creature and creator no similarity can be found so great but that the dissimilarity is always greater; any analogy between God and humans will always be inadequate
cultus, religious cult, cult - a system of religious beliefs and rituals; "devoted to the cultus of the Blessed Virgin"
cult - a religion or sect that is generally considered to be unorthodox, extremist, or false; "it was a satanic cult"
ecclesiasticism - religion appropriate to a church and to ecclesiastical principles and practices
mysticism, religious mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
nature worship - a system of religion that deifies and worships natural forces and phenomena
revealed religion - a religion founded primarily on the revelations of God to humankind
theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
heathenism, pagan religion, paganism - any of various religions other than Christianity or Judaism or Islamism
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
Hindooism, Hinduism - a body of religious and philosophical beliefs and cultural practices native to India and based on a caste system; it is characterized by a belief in reincarnation, by a belief in a supreme being of many forms and natures, by the view that opposing theories are aspects of one eternal truth, and by a desire for liberation from earthly evils
Brahmanism, Brahminism - the religious beliefs of ancient India as prescribed in the sacred Vedas and Brahmanas and Upanishads
Jainism - religion founded in the 6th century BC as a revolt against Hinduism; emphasizes asceticism and immortality and transmigration of the soul; denies existence of a perfect or supreme being
Sikhism - the doctrines of a monotheistic religion founded in northern India in the 16th century by Guru Nanak and combining elements of Hinduism and Islam
Buddhism - the teaching of Buddha that life is permeated with suffering caused by desire, that suffering ceases when desire ceases, and that enlightenment obtained through right conduct and wisdom and meditation releases one from desire and suffering and rebirth
Hsuan Chiao, Taoism - popular Chinese philosophical system based in teachings of Lao-tzu but characterized by a pantheism of many gods and the practices of alchemy and divination and magic
Shintoism, Shinto - the ancient indigenous religion of Japan lacking formal dogma; characterized by a veneration of nature spirits and of ancestors
Manichaeanism, Manichaeism - a religion founded by Manes in the third century; a synthesis of Zoroastrian dualism between light and dark and Babylonian folklore and Buddhist ethics and superficial elements of Christianity; spread widely in the Roman Empire but had largely died out by 1000
Mithraicism, Mithraism - ancient Persian religion; popular among Romans during first three centuries a.d.
2.faith - complete confidence in a person or plan etcfaith - complete confidence in a person or plan etc; "he cherished the faith of a good woman"; "the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
3.faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
institution, establishment - an organization founded and united for a specific purpose
Christian church, church - one of the groups of Christians who have their own beliefs and forms of worship
Hebraism, Jewish religion, Judaism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
Hindooism, Hinduism - the religion of most people in India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal
Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Buddhism - a religion represented by the many groups (especially in Asia) that profess various forms of the Buddhist doctrine and that venerate Buddha
Khalsa - the group of initiated Sikhs to which devout orthodox Sikhs are ritually admitted at puberty; founded by the tenth and last Guru in 1699
Church of Scientology, Scientology - a new religion founded by L. Ron Hubbard in 1955 and characterized by a belief in the power of a person's spirit to clear itself of past painful experiences through self-knowledge and spiritual fulfillment
Shinto - the native religion and former ethnic cult of Japan
established church - the church that is recognized as the official church of a nation
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
cult - followers of an unorthodox, extremist, or false religion or sect who often live outside of conventional society under the direction of a charismatic leader
cult - followers of an exclusive system of religious beliefs and practices
canonize, saint, canonise - declare (a dead person) to be a saint; "After he was shown to have performed a miracle, the priest was canonized"
exorcise, exorcize - expel through adjuration or prayers; "exorcise evil spirits"
confirm - administer the rite of confirmation to; "the children were confirmed in their mother's faith"
covenant - enter into a covenant
redeem, save, deliver - save from sins
4.faith - loyalty or allegiance to a cause or a personfaith - loyalty or allegiance to a cause or a person; "keep the faith"; "they broke faith with their investors"
allegiance, commitment, loyalty, dedication - the act of binding yourself (intellectually or emotionally) to a course of action; "his long commitment to public service"; "they felt no loyalty to a losing team"

faith

noun
2. religion, church, belief, persuasion, creed, communion, denomination, dogma England shifted officially from a Catholic to a Protestant faith in the 16th century.
religion agnosticism
break faith with someone be disloyal to, betray, be unfaithful to, be untrue to, grass (Brit. slang), cheat, stab in the back, sell down the river (informal), break your promise to We're breaking faith with our people.
in good faith honestly, sincerely, honourably This report was published in good faith.
keep faith with someone be loyal to, support, defend, stand by, be true to, stick by, be faithful to He's expected to keep faith with most of the World Cup team.
Quotations
"Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurrence of the improbable" [H.L. Mencken Prejudices: Third Series]
"Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen" Bible: Hebrews
"I show you doubt, to prove that faith exists" [Robert Browning Balaustion's Adventure]
"Faith without works is dead" Bible: James
"The faith that stands on authority is not faith" [Ralph Waldo Emerson Essays]
Proverbs
"Faith will move mountains"

faith

noun
1. Absolute certainty in the trustworthiness of another:
2. Mental acceptance of the truth or actuality of something:
3. A system of religious belief:
4. Those who accept and practice a particular religious belief:
Translations
إيمـانثِقَةثِقَهوَعْد، إخْلاص، ثِقَه
víradůvěraslovo
trotroskabreligiontillidtiltro
fido
usko
vjera
trútrú; trausttryggî, trúnaîur
信念
믿음
be blogų kėslųištikimaineištikimumasnepatikimumassu pagarba
solījumsticībauzticība
viera
veraverovanjezaupanje
tro
ความศรัทธา
inançsözüne sadık kalmagüven
niềm tin

faith

[feɪθ]
A. N
1. (Rel) → fe f; (= doctrine) → creencia f, doctrina f; (= sect, confession) → religión f
what faith does he belong to?¿qué religión tiene?
2. (= trust) → fe f, confianza f
to have faith in sth/sbtener fe or confianza en algo/algn, fiarse de algo/algn
to put one's faith in sth/sbconfiar en algo/algn
to break faithfaltar a la palabra (with dada a) to keep faithcumplir la palabra (with dada a) in (all) good faithde buena fe
in bad faithde mala fe
B. CPD faith healer Ncurandero/a m/f
faith healing Ncuración f por fe

faith

[ˈfeɪθ] n
(= trust) → confiance f
one's faith in sth → sa confiance dans qch
to have faith in sb/sth → avoir confiance en qn/qch
to lose faith in sb → ne plus avoir confiance en qn
to lose faith in sth → ne plus avoir confiance dans qch
People have lost faith in the government → Les gens n'ont plus confiance dans le gouvernement.
to place one's faith in sb → mettre sa confiance en qn
to place one's faith in sth → mettre sa confiance dans qch
(= religious belief) → foi f
people of all faiths → les gens de toutes confessions
the Catholic faith → la foi catholique
in good faith → en bonne foi

faith

n
(= trust)Vertrauen nt(in zu); (in human nature, medicine, science etc, religious faith) → Glaube m (→ in an +acc); faith in GodGottvertrauen nt; to have faith in somebodyjdm (ver)trauen; to have faith in somethingVertrauen in etw (acc)haben; act of faithVertrauensbeweis m; it was more an act of faith than a rational decisiondas war mehr auf gut Glück gemacht als eine rationale Entscheidung
(= religion)Glaube m no pl, → Bekenntnis nt
(= promise) to keep/break faith with somebodyjdm treu bleiben/untreu werden, jdm die Treue halten/brechen (geh)
(= sincerity, loyalty)Treue f; to act in good/bad faithin gutem Glauben/böser Absicht handeln

faith

:
faith healer
nGesundbeter(in) m(f)
faith healing
nGesundbeten nt
faithless
adjtreulos
faithlessness

faith

[feɪθ] n
a. (trust) → fiducia
to have faith in sb/sth → avere fiducia in qn/qc
to put one's faith in sb/sth → fidarsi di qn/qc
to keep/break faith with sb → mantenere la parola/mancare di parola con qn
in (all) good faith → in buona fede
in bad faith → in malafede
b. (Rel) (belief) → fede f, religione f
Faith, Hope and Charity → Fede, Speranza e Carità

faith

(feiθ) noun
1. trust or belief. She had faith in her ability.
2. religious belief. Years of hardship had not caused him to lose his faith.
3. loyalty to one's promise. to keep/break faith with someone.
ˈfaithful adjective
1. loyal and true; not changing. a faithful friend; faithful to his promise.
2. true or exact. a faithful account of what had happened.
ˈfaithfully adverb
Yours faithfully
a polite way of ending a formal (usually business) letter which starts with `Dear Sir` or `Dear Madam`. In American English `Sincerely yours` or `Truly yours` is used.
ˈfaithfulness noun
ˈfaithless adjective
ˈfaithlessness noun
in (all) good faith
sincerely. She made the offer in good faith.

faith

ثِقَة víra tro Glaube πίστη fe usko foi vjera fede 信念 믿음 vertrouwen tro wiara вера tro ความศรัทธา inanç niềm tin 信念

faith

n. fe;
in good ___de buena ___.

faith

n (religious) fe f
References in classic literature ?
Her faith in her mother was a little shaken by the worldly plans attributed to her by Mrs.
For him the coming of the boy David did much to bring back with renewed force the old faith and it seemed to him that God had at last looked with favor upon him.
His faith in it and his knowledge of it have played an important part in its development.
Foolish though it may be, you have often heard me avow my faith in the tones of the human voice
He has no patience with faith, an intense horror of superstition, and he scoffs openly at any talk of things not to be felt and seen and put down in figures.
It was generally attributed to differences between himself and his partners on the question of further outlay of their earnings on mining improvements--he and Philip Carr alone representing a sanguine minority whose faith in the future of the mine accepted any risks.
And yet, her undying faith and trust, her freshremembrance, and continual devotedness towards the original of that miniature, have been the only substance for her heart to feed upon.
This faith, more than anything else, steals the pith and availability out of whatever enterprise he may dream of undertaking.
What deadly voids and unbidden infidelities in the lines that seem to gnaw upon all Faith, and refuse resurrections to the beings who have placelessly perished without a grave.
Another reason which Sag-Harbor (he went by that name) urged for his want of faith in this matter of the prophet, was something obscurely in reference to his incarcerated body and the whale's gastric juices.
Here the characters are large and unsteady; the hand which traces them is become chilled and torpid; but the spirit survives, and the faith and resignation of the dying man are expressed with a sublime simplicity.
Even people whose lives have been made various by learning, sometimes find it hard to keep a fast hold on their habitual views of life, on their faith in the Invisible, nay, on the sense that their past joys and sorrows are a real experience, when they are suddenly transported to a new land, where the beings around them know nothing of their history, and share none of their ideas-- where their mother earth shows another lap, and human life has other forms than those on which their souls have been nourished.