faith school


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faith school

n
(Education) Brit a school that provides a general education within a framework of a specific religious belief
References in periodicals archive ?
They can apply for assistance if they live between two and 15 miles from their chosen faith school.
BRIAN Nathan-Partridge (Feb 17) made some good points about the location of the latest faith school, but the more important issue is why we have faith schools in the rst place.
The Ombudsman's decision came after one mum complained to her local MP and the watchdog when the council axed her son's free travel to a secondary faith school, where he started in September 2012.
I challenge Mr Cessford to name any state faith school (not private) over the last three centuries where sex abuse has been more prevalent than in other state institutions.
Councils must provide free transport to secondary school pupils who live three or more miles away, but transport to a faith school is discretionary.
Council bosses are currently more flexible when handing out bus passes to faith school pupils because there are fewer such schools to choose from in the city.
Free bus travel for faith school pupils and students over 16 could be axed by Birmingham City Council.
Mrs Cooper, MP for West Lancashire, pointed out that from the new school year next month it will cost parents pounds 380 per pupil per year to send their children to a faith school some distance away.
News of the spending comes after the Government's sudden U-turn last week on faith school "outsiders".
Kirklees is still analysing the impact of up to 456 children potentially relocating to the nearest school with an available place, should parents choose to take them out of a faith school due to the axe of free transport.
AHIGH Court decision to quash Swansea Council's controversial scrapping of free school transport for many faith school pupils will have rami-fications for councils across the UK.
The choice of a Welsh medium or faith school had fallen outside the traditional criteria for a mainstream education, in that local authorities used discretionary powers to fund free transport for pupils having to travel further to class.